» » The Streets
Download The Streets epub book
ISBN:0224096915
Author: Anthony Quinn
ISBN13: 978-0224096911
Title: The Streets
Format: mbr mobi rtf txt
ePUB size: 1886 kb
FB2 size: 1312 kb
DJVU size: 1911 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Jonathan Cape (2012)

The Streets by Anthony Quinn



In The Streets Anthony Quinn reconstructs an unforgettable picture of Victorian London, encompassing the extremes of privilege and privation, from the baronial mansions of the rich to the ‘whited tombs’ of the slums. With shocking poignancy and pin-sharp detail he brings to life a world of terrible degradation, yet one redeemed by dark comedy, profound fellow-feeling and the enduring possibility of love. Anthony Quinn was born in Liverpool in 1964. Since 1998 he has been the film critic of the Independent.

In The Streets Anthony Quinn reconstructs an unforgettable picture of Victorian London, encompassing the extremes of privilege and privation, from the baronial mansions of the rich to the 'whited tombs' of the slums. His second novel, HALF OF THE HUMAN RACE, was released in spring 2011. THE STREETS, Anthony's newest book, is set to be published by Johnathan Cape in October 2012. Books by Anthony Quinn. Mor. rivia About The Streets.

Anthony Quinn (also this newspaper's film critic) has courageously taken this second route. The Streets is also a thriller. The flawed Wildeblood is brought face-to-face with the flaws of those around him as he is drawn into the murky world of Victorian do-gooders whose motives are not quite as pure as they may seem. It leads to him become an inmate of a Dickensian workhouse and risk his life to get to the bottom of who is profiting by the abject misery of poor. But Dickens is perhaps the wrong name to highlight here.

In his third novel, Anthony Quinn transports his readers to poverty-stricken Somers Town in late 19th-century London; the once "labyrinthine streets and courts", nestled between King's Cross and Euston, that were home to some of the city's poorest inhabitants. The novel opens in 1882. Twenty-one-year-old David Wildeblood arrives in London to join the staff of The Labouring Classes of London, a weekly paper owned by charismatic Henry Marchmont, which chronicles the habits, occupations and earnings of the working man and woman.

Anthony Quinn's characters are drawn so vividly, their personalities formed by their attitudes and morals shine off the page. This is not the easiest book to get into, and may not be for everyone, but as the tale unfolds it well repays the perseverance of the reader. 4 people found this helpful.

David Wildeblood, an idealistic young journalist, pounds the streets of Camden reporting on the notorious slums. The misery and squalor surprise him, but more shocking still is the realisation that someone is profiting from this destitution. Powerful and heartfelt. Ms Eliot and Mr Dickens would surely approve’ Sunday Telegraph.

One minor story in the tale is of a desperate widowed mother, clinging to a home that’s been condemned for demolition.

From the author of Half of the Human Race (Channel 4 TV Book Club) comes an intricate and thrilling tale of love and conspiracy in Victorian London. David Wildeblood, an idealistic young journalist, pounds the streets of Camden reporting on the notorious slums.

He is horrified by the squalor and despair of the streets. A broken-down doctor makes him see the fragility of gentility: If someone of his education and class can fall through the net. You are currently logged out.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780224096911.

Reviews: 5
Coron
The Streets is an historical novel with a difference. Anthony Quinn draws a very stark portrait of Victorian London contrasting the life of privilege and indulgence lived by the rich with the terrible privations of the poor.

The story centers on young David Wildeblood who is Norfolk born. An estrangement from his parents leads him to seek work at the newspaper offices of Henry Marchmont, a well known figure, who produces a magazine called The Labouring Classes of London. Wildeblood joins a group whose job it is to go into the slums and interview the inhabitants, keeping records of their dwellings, occupations if any and how they live. Gently reared in rural Norfolk and hence rather naive, needless to say, Wildeblood is himself soon the victim of crime himself and only his friendship with Jo, a member of the labouring classes himself, saves him.

As Wildeblood delves deeper and deeper into the notorious Somerstown area of the city he becomes more and more appalled at the deprivations he sees and the at how narrow the line the poor walk between just getting by and the workhouse. Nor does he accept the perceived laissez-faire wisdom of the day to which his boss subscribes. Gradually he realizes that there is an even worse position taken by a group of wealthy people who are determined to practice their form of social engineering on the poorer classes of society.

Anthony Quinn's characters are drawn so vividly, their personalities formed by their attitudes and morals shine off the page. This is not the easiest book to get into, and may not be for everyone, but as the tale unfolds it well repays the perseverance of the reader.
Duktilar
It is 1881 and David Wildeblood is a young man who comes to London and begins work as the latest recruit for a successful weekly periodical, "The Labouring Classes on London." For the last two years the owner, Mr Marchmont, has investigated the lower classes and chronicled the findings, his aim to understand the causes and conditions of poverty. At first, David has immense problems carrying out his task of speaking to the inhabitants of the area he has been assigned. He doesn't understand the slang, the accents and the people who live there are suspicious of his motives. Then David meets Jo Garrett, who befriends him and accompanies him on his travels, and his mysterious sister Roma.

This is a novel which is very evocative of the time and place where it is set. The author has a wonderful hero in David Wildebood. He is a little uncomfortable, well meaning and totally naive, but always has the best intentions. While in London he meets his mysterious godfather, Sir Martin Elder, and his beautiful daughter Kitty. He also investigates the slum landlords in the area and uncovers a conspiracy during his travels. This book weaves the conspiracy plot, Victorian views of the poor, the horrors of slum housing and the fear of the workhouse, social reform and corruption in an interesting novel. It would be ideal for reading groups with much to discuss and think about, as well as a great storyline and characters.
Drelahuginn
This is the third novel from Anthony Quinn, and his writing does show the assuredness of one who is at ease with his craft. This is the story of one David Wildeblood, he is newly arrived from Norfolk to the big dark and dirty city that was Dickensian London. He is to go into the employ of a newspaper man, Henry Marchmont, who publishes a weekly news sheet that chronicles the plight of the inhabitants of the slum areas of London, particularly near St Pancras, and other areas.

He is only concerned with reportage and not in addressing their plight or the exorbitant rents charged by the invisible landlords, who are mostly `gentleman' who exploit their tenants in an endless orgy of naked greed. Our Mr Wildeblood is young, inexperienced but keen as a new puppy to get involved. Problem is his accent and lack of street savvy prove to be a barrier to getting close to the people he is supposed to be reporting on. Then after a serendipitous meeting with a young costermonger, called Jo, he makes a true ally and friend who is not only able but also willing to aid him in his job. He is also rather taken with the sultry sister of his new chum, the young Rosa.

Well then he goes off on a campaign to expose the shenanigans of what is happening to the poor folk, and gets himself into all sorts of bother. So what, if anything, is wrong with this book? Well it was just unengaging, I loved the writing style, as it is done as if contemporary to the time it is set in, so a sort of Dickens tale in may ways. The use of language is excellent and very much accomplished, it is just that the story itself is a bit laboured, the characters are well fleshed out, but I found myself not really caring about them, except Jo that is, who seemed to be a real salt of the earth type. The scenarios themselves are probable but many times seemed unlikely and often lent themselves to a tale by the aforementioned Dickens, but sadly without that quintessential charm, that makes you immediately forgive the authors wayward antics. This is still a fascinating book and a very good read indeed, but I was not feeling the love, hence my rating, I would however read any future offering from Mr Quinn.