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ISBN:0979976707
Author: Holley Mangham and Dennis Shockley
ISBN13: 978-0979976704
Title: How We Lived: A Pictorial History of the Places Oklahomans Have Called Home
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ePUB size: 1890 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Oklahoma Housing Finance Agency; 1st edition (March 1, 2008)
Pages: 192

How We Lived: A Pictorial History of the Places Oklahomans Have Called Home by Holley Mangham and Dennis Shockley



This official Oklahoma Centennial project looks back on Oklahoma's history with a reminiscent journey to the places Oklahomans have called home. The perseverance and courage of Oklahomans can be seen in the pages of How We Lived. Native American life on the plains; early settlement; land runs; Depression and Dust Bowl; powerful tornadoes; oil and agricultural busts all played a role in developing the character of Oklahoma's citizens.

A 2009 Oklahoma Book Award Finalist for Design. Just a little over a century ago, the place Oklahomans now call home beckoned settlers from across the country with the promise of land they could call their own. This official Oklahoma Centennial project looks back on Oklahoma's history with a reminiscent journey to the places Oklahomans have called home. The perseverance and courage of Oklahomans can be seen in the pages of How We Lived

How We Lived: A Pictorial History of the Places Oklahomans Have Called Home features more than 300 images spanning more than 200 years. The book, co-authored by OHFA director of communications Holley Mangham and executive director Dennis Shockley, was a finalist in the design category for the Oklahoma Book of the Year Awards. Since publication as part of Oklahoma’s 2007 statehood centennial, How We Lived has delighted readers as the pages take them on a journey through Oklahoma history.

Books by Holley Mangham, How we lived. How we lived: a pictorial history of the places Oklahomans have called home. Dwellings, History, Pictorial works.

Home All Categories How We Lived: A Pictorial History of the Places Oklahomans Have Called Home. ISBN13: 9780979976704. A 2009 Oklahoma Book Award Finalist for Design Just a little over a century ago, the place Oklahomans now call home beckoned settlers from across the country with the promise of land they could call their own.

His daughter, Elizabeth I, battled for succession and supremacy at home, and the discovery of "the round world" enabled a vast continent across the Atlantic to be explored. While this new era was spawning the beginnings of modern America, England was engaged in a bloody civil war and sustained a Republican experiment under the leadership of Oliver Cromwell. Vol. 3 The Age of Revolution. This last volume spans the period between 1815 and 1901. It draws to a close when the British Empire is at its peak - with a staggering one-fifth of the human race presided over by the longest reigning monarch in British history. As with the other volumes it is a history not only of the English-speaking peoples, but also fo the world that they inhabit.

Below we’ve put together a little pictorial guide showing his evolvement through the ages. The name Santa Claus has his roots in the informal Dutch name for St. Nicholas, Sinterklaas (an abbreviation of Sint Nikolaas). St. Nicholas was a historic 4th-century Greek saint (from an area now in modern day Turkey) who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes left out for him. He was also famous for presenting the three impoverished daughters of a pious Christian with dowries so that they would not have to become prostitutes. A year before the New York Historical Society’s feast the author Washington Irving had written about Santa in his satirical fiction Knickerbocker’s History of New York, describing a jolly St. Nicholas character as opposed to the saintly bishop of yesteryear – one who flew in a reindeer pulled sleigh and delivered presents down chimneys.

Once there lived a judge (судья). The king of the country heard so much about Judge Sheba that one day he said, "Everybody says that Sheba is the cleverest judge of my country. I want to see him myself. The king put on some poor clothes, took a horse and went to the town where the judge lived. On the way to the town he met a man. The man had no horse and had to walk. "Now I shall see how clever Judge Sheba is," he thought. When they came to the judge, they had to wait for their turn. The judge had some other cases (дело). The first was a case of a teacher and a farmer. They brought a slave with them, and each man said that the slave was his. Judge Sheba listened to them, and told them to leave the slave with him and to come back next morning. The second was a case of an oilman (продавец масла) and a worker.

A 2009 Oklahoma Book Award Finalist for Design

Just a little over a century ago, the place Oklahomans now call home beckoned settlers from across the country with the promise of land they could call their own.

This official Oklahoma Centennial project looks back on Oklahoma's history with a reminiscent journey to the places Oklahomans have called home.

The perseverance and courage of Oklahomans can be seen in the pages of How We Lived. Native American life on the plains; early settlement; land runs; Depression and Dust Bowl; powerful tornadoes; oil and agricultural busts all played a role in developing the character of Oklahoma's citizens.

It took just over two years of research to acquire the many photographs collected here. The Oklahoma Historical Society, the State Historic Preservation Office and the Western History Collection at the University of Oklahoma Library provided many of the images. The Tulsa Historical Society, the Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa, The Oklahoman newspaper and many smaller museums, archives and housing professionals also contributed.

While this volume is a celebration of Oklahoma's Centennial, the first chapter has been devoted to the pre-statehood era.