» » A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth
Download A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth epub book
ISBN:0585354405
ISBN13: 978-0585354408
Title: A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth
Format: lrf lit docx rtf
ePUB size: 1120 kb
FB2 size: 1640 kb
DJVU size: 1335 kb

A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth



When Fred Shuttlesworth suffered only a bump on the head in the 1956 bombing of his home, members of his church called it a miracle. Shuttlesworth took it as a sign that God would protect him on the mission that had made him a target that night. Standing in front of his demolished home, Shuttlesworth vigorously renewed his commitment to integrate Birmingham's buses, lunch counters, police force, and parks  . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

When Fred Shuttlesworth suffered only a bump on the head in the 1956 bombing of his home, members of his church called it a miracle. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Publisher: University of Alabama Press.

Shuttlesworth, Fred . 1922-2011. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Standing in front of his demolished home, Shuttlesworth vigorously renewed his commitment to integrate Birmingham's buses, lunch When Fred Shuttlesworth suffered only a bump on the head in the 1956 bombing of his home, members of his church called it a miracle. Despite the fact that this book was about a great man, it is a powerful argument against the "great man" theory of history. The civil rights movement was plural. with countless heroes. Standing in front of his demolished home, Shuttlesworth vigorously renewed his commitment to integrate Birmingham's buses, lunch counters, police force, and parks

book by Andrew M. Manis.

Frederick Lee "Fred" Shuttlesworth (born Fred Lee Robinson, March 18, 1922 – October 5, 2011) was a . civil rights activist who led the fight against segregation and other forms of racism as a minister in Birmingham, Alabama

Andrew Manis talked about his book, A Fire You Can’t Put Out, in which he examines the life of civil rights activist Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, who fought against segregation and other forms of racism as a minister in Birmingham, Alabama. Mr. Manis talked about how Shuttlesworth battled Jim Crow restrictions in a campaign that pitted him against the segregationist police commissioner Eugene Bull Connor. C-SPAN’s Local Content Vehicles (LCVs) made a stop in their 2014 LCV Cities Tour in Macon, Georgia, from January 20-23 to feature the history and literary life of the community

The action-packed, true-to-life story of the most unsung hero of the Civil Rights s Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. Andrew Manis talks about his book,, in which he examines the life of civil rights activist Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, who fought against segregation and other forms o. -span. org/video. illian Smith Book Awards Readings.

University of Alabama Press) Fred Shuttlesworth was instrumental in leading the many demonstrations which challenged segregation in Birmingham, Alabama, throughout the 1950s and 60s. He clashed with Birmingham's staunchly segregationist Police Commissioner, Eugene "Bull" Connor on several occasions and suffered constant harassment and personal injury in his efforts to end segregation. Rev. Shuttlesworth now lives in Cincinnati where he is a pastor. Liane speaks with Andrew Manis about his book "A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Rev. University of Alabama Press) Fred Shuttlesworth was instrumental in leading the many demonstrations which challenged segregation in Birmingham, Alabama, throughout the 1950s and 60s.

Reviews: 7
Unirtay
It was great to be reading this book during the fight over the Confederate flag in South Carolina. We will see more Confederate icons tumble, and a continuation of the "Black lives matter" movement against cop brutality, which has already become intertwined with the movement for $15 an hour and a union.

I had read Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, an excellent book written a few years after this was published which describes "the Battle of Birmingham" perhaps better than this one does. But I wanted to learn more about Fred Shuttlesworth, and while this book is not as exciting as Diane McWhorter's book, it's well written and has a lot of interesting material about Birmingham, the civil rights movement, the Black church, as well as about Shuttlesworth.
Shuttlesworth differed from Martin Luther King in many ways, but most of them flowed from his working class background. He was better able to communicate with working class African Americans, and far less willing to compromise than King. Although Shuttlesworth was a central leader of SCLC, King frequently avoided consulting him when he should have.

While King was afraid to defend Carl and Anne Braden and their organization the Southern Conference Educational Fund against the charges of it being a "Communist-front" organization, Shuttlesworth served as president of the organization.

There have been many good books published on the civil rights/Black power movements and some of its heroes. Among my favorite biographies are Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power and The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks. A book about Gloria Richardson, The Struggle is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation is in progress. So far there's no biography of E.D. Nixon, the real initiator of the Montgomery bus boycott, who like other working class blacks was shunted aside by the more moderate middle class leadership. He wasn't even invited to the tenth anniversary celebration of that battle! I hope to see a biography some day, but in the meantime read the book about Rosa Parks.

I'm not happy with any of the biographies of Malcolm X, but I can wholehearted recommend Malcolm X, Black Liberation, and the Road to Workers Power. It makes no claim to being an autobiography; it discusses the political trajectory of Malcolm X in the last year of his life. But it also is about the Black freedom struggle from Reconstruction through the present. Along with it, I recommend reading The Changing Face of U.S. Politics: Working-Class Politics and the Trade Unions, and Fighting Racism in World War II.

Below is an obituary of Fred Shuttlesworth from the socialist newspaper The Militant:

Vol. 75/No. 41 November 14, 2011

Fred Shuttlesworth, proletarian fighter: Helped lead Black rights struggle that permanently strengthened working class in U.S.

By John Benson and John Studer
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.--Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, a central leader of the mass proletarian movement for Black rights that smashed Jim Crow and permanently strengthened the fighting capacity of the working class by raising self-confidence among African-Americans and laying the basis for greater unity in struggle between workers of all races and nationalities, died here October 5. He was 89 years old.

Over the October 22-24 weekend, family, former combatants and Birmingham city officials organized three days of tributes, marches and rallies here to celebrate his life and the battles he fought.
Shuttlesworth is best known for his leadership in the pivotal 1963 confrontation with Jim Crow segregation and racist brutality that has come to be known as the Battle of Birmingham.

This monumental battle ushered in a new stage in the fight for Black rights. Tens of thousands of workers entered the fray with mass actions and direct confrontations.

Birmingham was a large center of heavy industry in the mostly rural South. It had the highest ratio of factory workers in the nation, with a deeply rooted union consciousness.

More than 60 percent of workers in the area's steel mills and coal mines were Black. Shuttlesworth's Bethel Baptist Church was located in one of the city's Black working-class neighborhoods.

In April 1963 Shuttlesworth won the agreement of Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders to support the campaign in Birmingham.

Thousands of workers and young people confronted the racists. When the police, led by Public Safety Commissioner Eugene "Bull" Connor, tried to arrest them all, the young fighters decided to overwhelm them. After arresting 2,400 people, the city government was hit with a march of 3,000 more. With their jails overflowing, Connor unleashed police dogs and high-pressure hoses. The youth kept coming, mass actions continued for months.

Shuttlesworth himself was bitten by dogs and had his chest damaged by the water hoses, putting him in the hospital.
The fight in Birmingham broke through the national and international news, winning sympathy and respect and inspiring working people, while exposing the Kennedy administration's refusal to curb the repressive violence meted out against workers and youth.

`Demonstrations will continue'
In the midst of the fight U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy called King and pressed him to call off the demonstrations. King agreed.

"Shuttlesworth was in the hospital," Rev. Claude Oliver told a Birmingham rally October 22. "Bobby Kennedy was on the phone waiting to hear the decision. Shuttlesworth heard of the decision and bolted from the hospital.
"Shuttlesworth had a few choice words for King and told him, `You can call off the demonstrations but they will continue.'"

King had to tell Kennedy that the deal was off.

The Battle of Birmingham inspired mass actions in cities across the country, including the historic confrontations in Selma and Montgomery the next year. Together, these fights shattered Jim Crow and the racist brutality organized to defend it, forcing the federal government to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Shuttlesworth was born in 1922 to Alberta Robinson, a 22-year-old single mother in Mugler, Ala. He got his last name when she married William Shuttlesworth, a coal miner.

The family tried to scratch out a living during the depression. Shuttlesworth was sentenced to two years probation in 1940 for working in a moonshine operation.

In 1943 he got a job as a truck driver at the Brookley Air Force Base. In one of his first political confrontations, Shuttlesworth protested a move by the bosses to cut the pay of one of his Black coworkers.

Shuttlesworth became pastor at the Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1953. He could not afford to attend an officially recognized religious college, getting his degree from an unaccredited Black preachers' school.
He joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which was challenging segregation across the South. He organized hundreds of workers to refuse to ride in the "colored" section on city buses and was brutally beaten when he tried to enroll his children in a segregated white school.

State officials target NAACP
The NAACP was targeted by officials all over the South. In 1956 Alabama Attorney General John Patterson sued the organization, using a state business disclosure law. The suit demanded the NAACP turn over its membership list to the state. Similar measures were adopted in Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
Because of the threat of deadly retaliation by the Klan and the cops, the NAACP refused. The organization was then saddled with massive fines and injunctions, forcing it to shut down.

Shuttlesworth responded by organizing the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. A June 5, 1956, mass meeting of nearly 1,000 elected Shuttlesworth president. The emphasis of the new organization was organizing direct action.
On Christmas evening 1956, Shuttlesworth's home was bombed.

After the bombing Shuttlesworth told supporters, "Take your shotguns home. There will be no nonviolence tonight," James Revis, Jr., told the October 22 meeting at the Bethel Baptist Church.

"I still have the double barreled shotgun my father used during his shift guarding the parsonage and church," George Perdue told the meeting.

Cadres born out of these clashes became the backbone of the proletarian movement that fought the Battle of Birmingham.
Shuttlesworth accepted a position as pastor at a church in Cincinnati in 1961, on the condition that he remain active in the fight in Birmingham.

He continued to fight against racism and police brutality, as well as speaking out in defense of victims of cop frame-ups, against imperialist war, and on other social issues.

In April 2001 protests broke out in Cincinnati following the cop killing of Timothy Thomas. Cuban youth leaders Yanelis Martínez and Javier Dueñas, on tour of the U.S. at the time, changed their tour schedule to go there. Shuttlesworth invited them to his church to discuss the Cuban Revolution. They also learned about the fight against police brutality unfolding in the city, as well as the lessons of the fight for Black rights in the 1950s and '60s.
In 2007 Shuttlesworth suffered a stroke, returning to Birmingham for rehabilitation the following year. He was no longer able to speak, but continued to fight against racist oppression and in the interests of the working class to the end of his life.

In 2010 Shuttlesworth was one of 11 veterans of Black rights' struggles who signed a "friend of the court" brief organized by the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, challenging a ruling by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals that a plant supervisor at Tyson Foods was not guilty of racist discrimination when he called an African-American worker "boy."

Also taking place in Birmingham October 22 was a rally in defense of immigrants' rights. The protest targeted a recently adopted anti-immigrant law in Alabama where signs were prominent calling for an end to "Juan Crow."
A moment of silence was organized to celebrate the fighting legacy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth at the rally. "Shuttlesworth fearlessly stood up to racist politicians," a bilingual leaflet explained, "and inspired millions to come out of the shadows and demand their dignity and rights."
Lcena
Most people remember the pictures of police dogs attacking black children. Many people remember that three young girls were killed in a church bombing. People have heard about the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and may have even read parts of it. Lawyers know that the modern law of libel is built on the Supreme Court decision New York Times v. Sullivan. But very few people understand that all of these events are closely connected. Even fewer understand that the hard, heroic work of one man made all of these historical moments happen. That man is Fred Shuttlesworth, and this biography ties all those hazy images together.

These days, what is now known as the civil rights movement is all too often reduced to a few hazy images--Martin Luther King giving his "I have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial; Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat on the bus; non-violent marches; sit ins at lunch counters; and perhaps a few images of violence. What is too often overlooked is that thousands of people worked day in and day out, for years on end, at great risk to their very lives, to make all of this happen. The civil rights movement did not just arise spontaneously, and victory was not won after a few marches and sit-ins. Victory took careful strategizing, coordination, and most importantly, people willing to do the hard work of recruiting, training, and motivating hundreds of thousands of people to participate.

Fred Shuttlesworth did all of that. Fred Shuttlesworth was born into a poor family, in the highly segregated south. But once the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, his long simmering fight against day-to-day racism ignited into "the fire you can't put out." Early on, his parsonage was destroyed by a bomb--while he and his family were home in bed. Look at the picture on page 204 of this book, and you will see a house destroyed down to its foundation. Yet, not only did the family all survive, but no one was seriously injured. From then on, Shuttlesworth knew that he had been called by God to fight against racism, and he fervently believed that he would prevail--because God would not call him to a battle he would not win.

During the decade between 1954, when Brown was decided, and 1964, when the Civil Rights Act was passed, Shuttlesworth lead demonstration after demonstration. He was repeatedly jailed...on the flimsiest of charges. He was repeatedly hospitalized after brutal beatings. Yet every time, he got up out of bed to go organize another demonstration.

He consistently fought against those who urged patience, argued that he was pushing the white power structure too fast. Believing that he was right, and that nothing less than full equality was acceptable, Shuttlesworth repeatedly answered that things were moving too SLOW, and needed to be pushed harder. One telling exchange is recounted by Manis on page 338, between a conservative Black minister (Porter) and Shuttlesworth. Porter is defending a white Episcopal bishop, but Shuttlesworth will have none of it--noting that the bishop said that full equality would take 50 years!

The irony is that the bishop was right. It is only now that this country is beginning to reach equality. It is only this new generation that is largely raised free of racism. But it took 50 years WITH Shuttlesworth's dynamism. It is hard to imagine what America would look like today had Shuttlesworth and others taken the advice to "go slow."

Manis has done a superb job of weaving together Shuttlesworth's personal life story with the larger events in Birmingham, and beyond. Anyone interested in the Civil Rights movement should read this book--bot so too should anyone interested in the nuts and bolts of how one effects social change.
Samuhn
I also purchased a copy of this book for my sister and brother. Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth was and should always be remembered as a great leader and a brave hero. This book is detailed, well illustrated with photos, easy to read and leaves nothing to the imagination. The history of the struggle for civil rights and Rev. Shuttlesworth's life-long devotion to this cause should be appreciated by all people--regardless of race, creed, color, or national origin. He really and truly made a difference in this world. Yes indeed, God was always watching over and guiding this minister!
Gir
Excelent coverage of Shuttlesworth's struggle in the crisis in Birmingham. Begins to redress the lack of recognition he has received in the shadow of Dr. King
Mr.mclav
Phenomenal book, and a must read for all!
Cala
I chose this rating because I actually read the book a little quicker than I expected leaving me wanting more information. I would recommend this book to persons interested in historical African American persons who played an important role in the Civil Rights Movement aside from the much more published MLK.
Bradeya
Wonderful writing about an unsung hero of the civil rights movement!