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ISBN:1409109623
Author: James Lee Burke James Lee Burke
ISBN13: 978-1409109624
Title: To the Bright and Shining Sun
Format: txt mbr mobi doc
ePUB size: 1898 kb
FB2 size: 1367 kb
DJVU size: 1115 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Orion (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd ) (2012)

To the Bright and Shining Sun by James Lee Burke James Lee Burke



In this novel, Burke brings his brilliant feel for time and place to a stunning story of Appalachia in the early 1960s. Here Perry Woodson Hatfield James, a young man torn between family honor and the lure of seedy watering holes, must somehow survive the tempestuous journey from boyhood to manhood and escape the dark and atavistic heritage of the Cumberland Mountains.

In this novel, James Lee Burke brings his brilliant feel for time and place to a stunning story of Appalachia in the early 1960s. Here Perry Woodson Hatfield James, torn between family honour and the lure of seedy watering holes must somehow survive the tempestuous journey from boyhood to manhood and escape the dark heritage of the Cumberland Mountains. Find Out About His New Books First.

For generations, Perry James' family, staunch unionists, has lived under the shadow of the Cumberland range and worked in the coal mines. Read and listen to as many books as you like! Download books offline, listen to several books simultaneously, switch to kids mode, or try out a book that you never thought you would. Discover the best book experience you'd ever have.

I do not know if James Lee Burke grew up around mining towns or ever knew the hard-working poverty of such places, but he has a clear and realistic picture of exactly what such a life is. It is a life in which most are born rabbits and the wolves and hawks and snakes and bobcats are all around, hungry and devouring, and the poor rabbits are defenseless. This is not a thriller however. To The Bright and Shining Sun was the second JLB novel I read. It has the single most beautifully written end to a book that I can think of. JLB's prose is just beautiful in it's descriptive power and eloquence. The only comparison I can make would be Thomas Hardy's description of the happy pastoral scenes in Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

In this novel, Burke brings his brilliant feel for time and place to a stunning story of Appalachia in the early 1960s. Download from free file storage. Скачать с помощью Mediaget.

Written by James Lee Burke, Audiobook narrated by Tom Stechschulte.

James Lee Burke, a writer who can touch you in ways few writers can (The Washington Post) brings his brilliant feel for time and place to this stunning story of Appalachia in the early 1960s. Here, Perry Woodson Hatfield James, a young man torn between family honor and the lure of seedy watering holes, must somehow survive the tempestuous journey from boyhood to manhood and escape the dark and atavistic heritage of the Cumberland Mountains. To the Bright and Shining Sun. CHAPTER.

The air became black with coal dust. Fri, 01 Mar 2019 19:52:56 +0000. This is a Multifile Torrent. 08 To the Bright and Shining Su. p3 2. 9 MBs. 02 To the Bright and Shining Su. 2 MBs. 03 To the Bright and Shining Su. 4 MBs. 04 To the Bright and Shining Su. p3 1. 3 MBs. 05 To the Bright and Shining Su. p3 . 06 To the Bright and Shining Su. 5 MBs. 07 To the Bright and Shining Su. MBs. 01 To the Bright and Shining Su. 8 MBs. 09 To the Bright and Shining Su. 10 To the Bright and Shining Su. 1 MBs.

James Lee Burke is a New York Times bestselling author, two-time winner of the Edgar Award, and the recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts in Fiction. He’s authored thirty-six novels and two short story collections. He lives in Missoula, Montana. I seen them drop a charge like this on Black Mountain in Harlan once, and the trees and rocks burst all over the sun. The dust stayed black across the crest of the ridge until twilight when it started to rain. He wished he was back home in the cabin now, with the dry poplar logs and huge coal lumps burning in the blackened sandstone fireplace.

Reviews: 7
Dianaghma
Burke’s novel encapsulates the struggle of the coal miners in Kentucky, who hope for better job conditions and better wages. We are thrust into this struggle and fight within the first pages of the novel.

After finishing this novel, I’ve been thinking quite often about the title. What is the significance, I ask myself? I looked up song titles and there are several named “To the Bright and Shining Sun”, one bluegrass and one from an Irish band, The Walls, a top ten hit in Ireland in 2006. Somehow, I’m thinking the reference is not to the Irish band (good tune though, nonetheless).

However, in many ways, I think the title is a symbol of optimism amid very bleak and quite fleeting conditions for the miners, with Perry, a flawed, but compelling main character as the light for that hope.

Maybe I’m overselling Perry. In fact, I probably am. He’s very flawed—and stubborn, pig-headed, and sometimes just down right stupid, especially in his decision making. But, I think he carries a certain pride and humanness, and if a character doesn’t turn the corner at all in a book, or change from point A to point B, then are they really that compelling? Perry does. Yes, this is coming of age tale, and he does see the bigger picture at points. It just takes him quite a bit of failure and life lessons to get there. There is a constant internal conflict running within him, his pride often ruins many chances to break the cycle of poverty and bleak living conditions. At times, Perry reminds me a bit of Tom Joad in The Grapes of Wrath, a sort of rebel who has a vision for better times. At one point, Perry ponders about the cycle that never seems to break:
“There ain’t nothing that goes along this good for so long without something happening. Things just don’t stay straight like that. At least not for us. There’s always something that’s going to shove a stick between your feet when you feel your almost there.”

I thought Burke’s writing so powerful and human. He really can paint a picture of a realistic struggle and conflict, and does so with spot-on prose that illustrates the bleak, difficult lives of his characters.
Wenaiand
I read one of Burke's Robicheaux detective stories and enjoyed it very much. Looking for more Burke but a change of pace, I purchased this because it looked interesting. I am from North Carolina, and much of the action in the first half of the book takes place there, but it begins and ends in Kentucky coal country. The protagonist, Perry James, makes so many self-destructive decisions that I lost all interest in his ability to persevere, as it was obvious no matter how many chances he was given, he would sabotage them through his stubbornness. Towards the end of the book I got so tired of his effortless ability to make the wrong decisions that I stopped reading it. I don't know how it ended, but I was so bored with Perry's continued bad choices that I didn't care anymore. Maybe Perry made it out of the mines eventually and found some kind of peace, or maybe he drank himself to death in the local bars. I did not care enough about him to read the last couple of chapters and find out. A major disappointment from an otherwise talented author.
Irostamore
I don't know when this was written as I read it on a Kindle and didn't have a title page.. but I'd have to guess it was an earlier work by JLB. As in most of his writing this is a "David vs Goliath" story.. the struggle of those that have versus those without. I absolutely love JLB's descriptive powers though I felt they were a bit under developed in this story compared to his other books.. I admire his sense of justice and agree in his vision of how the world works. I'm no literary genius but I rank him as my favorite in contemporary literature... unfortunately I've read just about everything he has written and I am now going though them all again and must say they are even better the second time around. I can't say that about any other writer except maybe Larry McMurtry in the Lonesome Dove series. I fear the day I'll have no new James Lee Burke books to read for that will be a sad day indeed. The man is a brilliant storyteller.
Jube
Once I began this book, I could not put it down! This is a compelling story of stark, strong, bull-headed folks doing whatever is necessary to be good union workers as the coal mining companies try to strip the workers of their self respect while they strip the land of its resources. I will not forget Perry James and his strength of character, nor his kinfolk. Wow.
Delirium
It doesn't matter what period of history it is. James Lee Burke captures it and fluidly draws the the reader into the characters and the environment in a way that few can. He takes one to a place of visceral feeling that exists to this day in Eastern Kentucky, while recreating the history that led to it.
Zacki
I thought I had read everything Burke had wrote and then I found this. It seems more like Leonard Elmore which is good thing. This is an interesting early work that will resonate if you have roots in Appalachia or especially eastern KY. It coud almost be a prequel to "Fire in the Hole" or "Raylan".
Agalen
This may be Burke's best novel. I think he is the finest author writing in English today, and one of the finest of the past 100+ years. His ability to evoke mood is astounding, as his ability to describe his character's surroundings. Burke writes powerfully--and as a Vietnam veteran, he often causes tears to come to my eyes.
I liked it. I didn't like how the protagonist continuously ruined his own chances by doing exactly what he said he wouldn't do. Such as getting drunk when he only intended to have a couple of drinks, or quitting his training when he fought to get it.

But it showed how immature he was and I think that was the point.