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ISBN:1893531023
Author: David T. King
ISBN13: 978-1893531024
Title: Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith, Volume I: A Biblical Defense of the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura
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Language: English
Publisher: Christian Resources, Inc. (October 2001)
Pages: 308

Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith, Volume I: A Biblical Defense of the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura by David T. King



Volume 2 is over 400 pages and deals with sola Scripture from an historical perspective. Finally, volume 3 is approximately 300 pages of quotes from the fathers on the subject of sola Scriptura. In the end, I think King and Webster have set the new standard for discussions on this topic. Since the formal cause of the reformation was 'sola scriptura', one would expect Roman Catholics to downgrade a book such as this one.

Outstanding Introduction to, Defense of Sola Scriptura! Published by Thriftbooks. Volume 1 contains close to 300 pages and deals with sola Scriptura from a biblical perspective. Volume 2 is over 400 pages and deals with sola Scripture from an historical perspective. In this volume David King covers revelation (Catholic and Protestant views), exegesis of primary New Testament texts, New Testament meaning of tradition, Scripture the only infallible norm, Scripture the only certain norm, material sufficiency of Scripture, formal sufficiency of Scripture, final authority (Catholic and Protestant views), and common misrepresentations of sola Scriptura. These are all major categories that are further broken down into numerous sub-categories.

In this Volume, David King provides a biblical defense of sola Scriptura. He systematically addresses and answers the Roman Catholic arguments against sola Scriptura.

Anti-Catholic polemicists David T. King and William Webster produced a self-published three-volume series entitled Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith (2001). Volume 1 from David T. King is entitled A Biblical Defense of the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura. I was looking through them as a result of some recent discussions, and noticed that Vol. I had an Index of Scriptural References.

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HOLY SCRIPTURE: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith – Volume I. By: David T. King. In this Volume, David King provides a biblical defense of sola Scriptura.

Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith, Volume I: A Biblical Defense of the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura. Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith, Volume II: An Historical Defense of the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura. King, David . Webster, William. Holy Scripture: The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith, Volume III: The Writings of the Church Fathers Affirming the Reformation Principle of Sola Scriptura.

Volume I: In this Volume, David King provides a biblical defense of sola Scriptura. He systematically addresses and answers the Roman Catholic arguments against sola Scriptura

His work has exposed the many errors and massive historical revisionism in which popular Roman Catholic apologists engage on the issue of Scripture and tradition. He has been a guest on Christian talk radio as well as a featured speaker at Bible conferences dealing with various issues of Roman Catholicism. o Session Six: The Patristic Roots of Sola Fide, Part 2 MP3 of Session Six. Pastor King also preached at Clarkson Community Church on Sunday, February 27. The Heritage of the Reformation" (Romans 1:9-19) MP3 of Sermon.

A Biblical defense of the Reformation principle of Sola Scriptura.
Reviews: 7
Samutilar
It seems as if the demise of sola Scriptura has been highly exaggerated. I admit that there are few comprehensive works of this vital truth. Furthermore, one would have to go back a few centuries to the work of William Whitaker, "Disputations on Holy Scripture" in 1588 or William Goode's "The Divine Rule of Faith and Practice" in 1853 for a comprehensive defense of sola Scriptura. However, with the work of David King and William Webster things have now changed. A contemporary comprehensive work is now available in "Holy Scripture The Ground and Pillar of Our Faith". In this three-volume work King and Webster has done the church an enormous service. Volume 1 contains close to 300 pages and deals with sola Scriptura from a biblical perspective. Volume 2 is over 400 pages and deals with sola Scripture from an historical perspective. Finally, volume 3 is approximately 300 pages of quotes from the fathers on the subject of sola Scriptura. In the end, I think King and Webster have set the new standard for discussions on this topic. This generation and generations to come are blessed with the most thorough comprehensive investigation of sola Scripture from a biblical and historical perspective available.
Volume 1 deals with the biblical evidence for sola Scripture and until reading it I hadn't really considered all the ancillary doctrines that affect sola Scripture. In this volume David King covers revelation (Catholic and Protestant views), exegesis of primary New Testament texts, New Testament meaning of tradition, Scripture the only infallible norm, Scripture the only certain norm, material sufficiency of Scripture, formal sufficiency of Scripture, final authority (Catholic and Protestant views), and common misrepresentations of sola Scriptura. These are all major categories that are further broken down into numerous sub-categories. For instance at one point under the major category of Scripture the only certain norm, King deals with an accusation against the integrity of Scripture by a well-known Catholic apologist. King systematically destroys this argument by a barrage of evidence to show the charge is baseless. He uses Jesus Christ, the church fathers, contemporary Protestant scholars, and even Catholic scholars! By the time King finishes one is left in amazement that anyone who has seriously studied the issue would doubt or attempt to assail the veracity of the Scriptures. King is never a lone ranger in his interpretation or conclusions, but always has one or more of the aforementioned witnesses to confirm his reasoning. Therefore, for the non-Protestant who thinks this will be a futile exercise of Protestants reading their belief into Scripture you will be in for a surprise. King consistently confirms his exegesis and conclusions with fathers, theologians, and scholars from many different camps.
After reading volume one you might wonder what more is there to know in order to defend or believe in sola Scriptura? Well, if anyone has discussed this issue with Catholics you know the answer, church history and church fathers. William Webster steps up to the challenge of showing that sola Scriptura is not the novelty that one often hear it is, but it is rooted in the beliefs of the early church. The most confusing issue when discussing the role of Scripture and tradition in the early church is what does the fathers mean when they use the word "tradition". To one not familiar with the writings of the early fathers and the meaning of this single word it can and has been greatly misused. Webster contends that this word was used in the following ways by the early church:
1) The apostolic teaching handed down by the Apostles, called the apostolic tradition
2) Ecclesiastical customs and practices.
3) Patristic consensus of the interpretation of Scripture way.
For the next 200 plus pages he goes through the work of the early fathers. Webster not only demonstrates that this is the way the word "tradition" was used, but he also shows that "tradition" in no way invalidates the early church's belief in Scripture as the sole infallible source that all doctrines must be proved by. In addition to the previous discussion Webster also devotes two chapters to Rome's authority claim in part 1. He shows how Catholicism has abandoned her unanimous consent of the fathers to guide her interpretations and doctrines. Instead the Catholic Church's guide is whatever the current magisterium says. Part 2 of this volume is dedicated to the Canon of the Old Testament. Webster lays out an extremely convincing case that the OT Canon was settled by the Jews at 22 books. He shows that the majority of church fathers and theologians up to the time of the Reformation agreed with Jerome that there were two concepts of the word canon. The Apocrypha was considered canon, but not in the strict sense of the word canon as the other books of the Hebrew canon. Webster amasses an overwhelming list of fathers and church theologians that are in agreement with his contention.
In volume 3 we are presented with a catena of quotes from the early church fathers in reference to sola Scriptura. The topics include material sufficiency of Scripture, Scripture as the ultimate authority, the perspicuity of Scripture, the self-interpreting nature of Scripture, the work of the Holy Spirit in the individual believers life to understand the Scriptures, and the necessity of private reading of Scripture for the sanctification of the individual. A quick skimming of this volume alone should cause one to think twice before affirming the early church knew nothing of sola Scriptura. In each section you will read men such as Ireneaus, Athanasius, Jerome, Tertullian, Origen, Chrysostom, Augustine, and others claim the truths Protestants have been defending since the Reformation.
In conclusion, King and Webster have set a new standard for the discussion of sola Scriptura. . I believe the greatness of this work is that no one can accuse them of coming up with some theological novelty. This is true because they constantly validate their interpretations of the Scriptures and church history with Protestants scholars, Catholic scholars, church fathers, and or/and church theologians. Protestants should devour this work so that they will be equipped to give an answer for their beliefs as commanded by the Scriptures. Anyone else who is involved with discussions on this important matter should also read this work, because there is no doubt it will become the standard for all sola Scriptura discussions.
Stylish Monkey
. . . which requires people who are trying to post an opinion to have actually purchased the book in question. I stand by this book (and its companions in the series) as a 5-star read even for the opponents of the theology it proposes, and roundly challenge the 1-star "reviewers" to cite any part of this book in substantiating their low rating.
This is great scholarship, great readability, and great food for thought.
Yozshubei
To make this simple, of the 12 reviews posted when I wrote this, all of them with 3 stars or less were written by Roman Catholic apologists and all of them with 4 stars or more were written by Protestant apologists.

Since the formal cause of the reformation was 'sola scriptura', one would expect Roman Catholics to downgrade a book such as this one. I'm a bit surprised they gave even 3 stars.
WinDImmortaL
As a revert to the reform position of sola scriptura, this book and the other two volumes were the main reasons i could no longer believe in the catholic notion of "inspired Tradition" because i could not find it in scripture or history. I am deeply sorry that i fell to catholic apologists of the likes of Scott Hahn, Robert Sungenis & Karl Keating, who are truly diluting the minds of catholics who want to know the truth about their church. Thanks to Mr Webster for such a book as this, the evidence for sola scripture in the fathers is undeniable and utterly shocking to the catholic position, sola scriptura, sola fide, all glory be to god and his word.
Pipet
This book is a thorough and sustained argument for the final authority of Scripture over all other authorities, and proceeds partly by expositions of the principle under various headings and partly by interaction with a number of common Roman Catholic polemics against Sola Scriptura.
The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 deals with the concept of divine revelation, expositing the differences between general revelation and special revelation, the relationship of special revelation and Scripture, and the Roman Catholic concept of special revelation as it relates to Scripture and "oral Tradition". Pastor King thoroughly exposes the amazing ambiguity that exists among Roman Catholic scholars as to the exact status of "Tradition" (is it or is it not a second source of divine revelation, independent of Scripture and containing information that Scripture does not contain?). His case is made mainly with copious citations from prominent Roman Catholic theologians, thus removing this part of the work from the sorts of distortions that can often occur in the midst of heated apologetic battles among laymen.
Part 2 sets forth the biblical foundations for Sola Scriptura, exegeting the New Testament texts that speak of the nature and sufficiency of Scripture and also those that concern "apostolic tradition". Of great use here is the discussion on private judgment and the self-attesting nature of Scripture's authority.
Part 3 is concerned with the meaning of Sola Scriptura. Here pastor King ably and often with delightful wit further exposes a number of problems with standard Roman Catholic positions on Scripture and Tradition, and in the process also helps to correct common Evangelical misunderstandings of Sola Scriptura. This book is the best contemporary treatment of these issues that I know of, and I highly recommend it to anyone. Protestants will find their belief in the sufficiency and clarity of Scripture deeply bolstered, and Roman Catholics will find many of their misconceptions about Sola Scriptura held accountable to the bar of sound reason, history, and simple honesty.