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ISBN:0824036417
Author: Forrest A. Walkers
ISBN13: 978-0824036416
Title: The Civil Works Administration: An Experiment in Federal Work Relief, 1933-1934
Format: azw lit doc rtf
ePUB size: 1187 kb
FB2 size: 1754 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Garland Pub. (December 1, 1978)
Pages: 228

The Civil Works Administration: An Experiment in Federal Work Relief, 1933-1934 by Forrest A. Walkers



Federal Civil Works Administration. Uniform Title: Modern American history. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Civil Works Administration : an experiment in Federal work relief, 1933-1934, Forrest A. Walker online for free.

Schwartz, Bonnie Fox. The Civil Works Administration, 1933-1934: The Business of Emergency Employment in the New Deal (1984), a standard scholarly history. Walker, Forrest A. The Civil Works Administration: an experiment in Federal work relief, 1933-1934 (1979), a standard scholarly history. McJimsey, George, ed. FDR, Harry Hopkins, and the civil works administration (LexisNexis, 2006) 679 pages; vol 30. of the Documentary History of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration

The Civil Works Administration (CWA), created in the fall of 1933 and disbanded the following spring, was the first, public employment experiment of the New Deal. At its peak in January of 1934, CWA employed approximately four million workers. The program initiated many projects that later were absorbed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA, 1935 to 1941). Perhaps most importantly, CWA took several million relief recipients off of the federal "dole" and gave them employment and regular wages. The Civil Works Administration: An Experiment in Federal Work Relief, 1933–1934.

Walker, Forrest A. Roosevelt Administration. Report on Civil Works Administration of Alabama, Jefferson County Division, Nov. 19, 1933 - Mar. 31, 1934" in the Birmingham Public Library's Digital Collections. Headed by Harry Hopkins and run as an entirely federal program, the CWA recruited more than 4 millio. Historical Dictionary of the Roosevelt–Truman Era. Roosevelt Administration

Book Description: Bonnie Fox Schwartz examines the New Deal's Civil Works Administration, the first federal job-creation program for the unemployed. Originally published in 1984.

Forrest A. Walker, The Civil Works Administration: An Experiment in Federal Work Relief, (New York: Garland Publishing, 1979), 33. M Erc atus center at george ma son u niversit y. DC, hotel as Hopkins explained how the new program squared with the expectations of his audience. 17 In February 1934, the CWA began to curtail its activities, and on March 31, it effectively ceased operation. During its 136 days of existence, the CWA undertook 177,600 projects, from sealing abandoned coal mines to compiling and analyzing climate data from the Soviet Union.

CHAPTER NINE Reconversion to Work Relief: the FERA Work Division and the WPA ON FEBRUARY 28, 1934, the White House issued a press re­ lease, announcing a new three-point program under which the Federal Emergency Relief Administration would replace the scrapped CWA. Throughout the winter, FERA grants-in-aid had continued to support direct relief as well as supplementary programs for transients and self-help cooperatives through state and local emergency relief offices. Now, the FERA would take up the great burden, according to an ambitious blueprint

Start by marking Civil Works Administration, 1933-1934: The Business of Emergency Employment in the New Deal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Bonnie Fox Schwartz examines the New Deal's Civil Works Administration, the first federal job-creation program for the unemployed.

The Civil Works Administration (CWA) was a short-lived U.S. job creation program established by the New Deal during the Great Depression to rapidly create manual labor jobs for millions of unemployed workers. The jobs were merely temporary, for the duration of the hard winter of 1933-34. President Franklin D. Roosevelt unveiled the CWA on November 8, 1933 and put Harry L. Hopkins in charge of the short-term agency. Roosevelt was convinced that jobs were much better for everyone than cash handouts. The CWA was a project created under the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA). The CWA created construction jobs, mainly improving or constructing buildings and bridges. It ended on March 31, 1934, after spending $200 million a month and giving jobs to 4 million people. The CWA's workers laid 12 million feet of sewer pipe and built or improved 255,000 miles of roads, 40,000 schools, 3,700 playgrounds, and nearly 1,000 airports (not to mention building 250,000 outhouses still badly needed in rural America). The program was praised by Alf Landon, who later ran against Roosevelt in the 1936 election. Representative of the work are one county's accomplishments in less than five months, from November 1933 to March 1934. Grand Forks County, North Dakota put 2,392 unemployed workers on its payroll at a cost of about $250,000. When the CWA began in eastern Connecticut, it could hire only 480 workers out of 1,500 who registered for jobs. Projects undertaken included work on city utility systems, public buildings, parks, and roads. Rural areas profited, with most labor being directed to roads and community schools. Although the CWA provided much employment, there were many taxpayers who saw leaves being raked but nothing of permanent value. Roosevelt told his cabinet that this criticism moved him to end the program and replace it with the WPA which would have long-term value for the society, in addition to short-term benefits for the unemployed.