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ISBN:9173460451
Author: Margareta Olsson
ISBN13: 978-9173460453
Title: Intelligibility: An evaluation of some features of English produced by Swedish 14-year-olds (Gothenburg studies in English)
Format: lrf lrf rtf txt
ePUB size: 1512 kb
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DJVU size: 1451 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis; First Edition edition (1977)
Pages: 254

Intelligibility: An evaluation of some features of English produced by Swedish 14-year-olds (Gothenburg studies in English) by Margareta Olsson



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Those varieties of English which are spoken outside of Britain and America are variously referred to as overseas or extraterritorial varieties. In those cases where the variation has been between dialects and/or sociolects and the arising standard the features in question have become indicators of non-standardness. Raymond Hickey Varieties studies Page 14 of 68. Britain. Divisions within England.

Canadian English is influenced both by British and American English but it also has some specific features of its own. Specifically Canadian words are called Canadianisms. there are Australian English, Canadian English, Indian English. Each of these has developed a literature of its own, and is characterised by peculiarities in phonetics, spelling, grammar and vocabulary

Book · January 2005 with 1,616 Reads. DOI: 1. 057/9780230511910. The existing analytical frameworks for linguistic features employed in written discourse are largely functionally oriented, classifying them by their metadiscoursal (Hyland, 2005a) or appraisal (Martin and White, 2005) functions. While these frameworks handle linguistic markers well at the metafunctional level and have offered useful insights into characteristics of academic English, they do not distinguish linguistic markers at the semantic level.

The oldest records of this branch are the runic inscriptions, some of which date as far back as the third or fourth century. Sometimes it also resulted in the frame constructions and inversions. Word formation and vocabulary.

With the levelling of inflections, the distinctions of grammatical gender in English were replaced by those of natural gender. During this period the dual number fell into disuse, and the dative and accusative of pronouns were reduced to a common form. Furthermore, the Scandinavian they, them were substituted for the original hie, hem of the third person plural, and who, which, and that acquired their present relative functions.

This means that it can distinguish word meanings by differences in pitch. This may result in the production of statements in English that sound like questions or sentences that sound incomplete (particularly sentences ending with a two-syllable word). Problematic for beginning learners is the use of the auxiliary do in English questions and negative statements. Swedish is uninflected; possibly for this reason even some very proficent speakers of English speakers omit the -s ending in the third person of the present simple tense: My mother work in a bank.

In English literature, the Augustan Age, 1700 - 1745, refers to literature with the predominant characteristics of refinement, clarity, elegance, and balance of judgement. Well- known writers of the Augustan Age include Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, and Daniel Defoe. The Romantic Period of English literature began in the late 18th century and lasted until approximately 1832. Because the Victorian Period of English literature spans over six decades, the year 1870 is often used to divide the era into "early Victorian" and "late Victorian.