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Download Crown of thorns: The death of the Great Barrier Reef? epub book
ISBN:020712390X
Author: Theo W Brown
ISBN13: 978-0207123900
Title: Crown of thorns: The death of the Great Barrier Reef?
Format: mobi lrf mbr docx
ePUB size: 1203 kb
FB2 size: 1985 kb
DJVU size: 1759 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Angus and Robertson (1972)
Pages: 128

Crown of thorns: The death of the Great Barrier Reef? by Theo W Brown



Crown Of Thorns book. Read by Theo W. Brown. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Australia (1) Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (1) echinoderms (1) ecology (1) Great Barrier Reef (1) Great Barrier Reef-Infestation by Crown of Thorns starfish-Surveys (1) marine biology (1). refresh. Member recommendations. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Crown of thorns starfish have an enormous ‘appetite for coral flesh’ and each adult can eat 10 square metres of precious tissue every year. They think the use of fertilisers in farming - combined with flooding - is causing the population explosion as more larvae are able to survive. Scientists have long warned that the Great Barrier Reef is under threat from bleaching, caused by rising water temperatures. But there is a bigger risk to the colourful coral – and it comes in the form of exploding populations of carnivorous starfish. Crown of thorns starfish have an enormous ‘appetite for coral flesh’ and each adult can chomp through up to 10 square metres of precious coral tissue every year.

On the Great Barrier Reef they come from the North and travel down to the south eating as they go. This in effect can be alot like the coral's bleaching (that's where it got the name). The starfish as it slowly eats the coral polyp turns the coral white. This may look like it makes for a slow meal but they move quicker than you think. Moving down the reef from the north end to the south end they devour as much coral as they can on the way bleaching the reef white.

The Great Barrier Reef is the world's largest coral reef system composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres (1,400 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi). The reef is located in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia. The Great Barrier Reef can be seen from outer space and is the world's biggest single structure made by living organisms.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Crown of Thorns Database. A computer database comprising records of crown-of-thorns starfish and coral abundance for the GBR, compiled from scientific surveys and user reports by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park AuthorityGoogle Scholar. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (1981) Nomination of the Great Barrier Reef by the Commonwealth of Australia for inclusion in the World Heritage List. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, TownsvilleGoogle Scholar

Crown-of-thorn starfish invasions are devastating to reefs. These corallivores can consume up to 6 square meters (65 square feet) of coral per starfish per year and the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators is trying to stay ahead of the population explosion. A crown-of-thorns starfish on a reef in Fiji. Photo by Matt Wright, Flickr. The Reef is still recovering in many areas and according to records, the coral cover is at its lowest point since record keeping began in 1985.

Since Crown of Thorns Starfish is one of the main threats to the future of the Great Barrier Reef we wanted to find out more. 12 interesting facts about crown of thorns starfish. COTS spawn on the Great Barrier Reef between October-March when water temperatures are at their highest. Female COTS release eggs into the water and nearby males release sperm, which then fertilise the eggs. Large female COTS can produce up to 65 million eggs per season.