» » Economic-demographic simulation models: A review of their usefulness for policy analysis (Population and agricultural development)
Download Economic-demographic simulation models: A review of their usefulness for policy analysis (Population and agricultural development) epub book
ISBN:9251007020
Author: Warren C Sanderson
ISBN13: 978-9251007020
Title: Economic-demographic simulation models: A review of their usefulness for policy analysis (Population and agricultural development)
Format: lit lrf rtf lrf
ePUB size: 1320 kb
FB2 size: 1488 kb
DJVU size: 1258 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (1978)

Economic-demographic simulation models: A review of their usefulness for policy analysis (Population and agricultural development) by Warren C Sanderson



This paper assesses the usefulness of simulation models for policy analysis, emphasizing in particular the relevance of the current state of the art for agricultural development planners. Authors: W C Sanderson

IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria: RR-80-014.

The urban environment is subject to much the same analysis. Anderson, D. (2001b), ‘Dynamic Simulation and Environment Policy Analysis: Beyond Comparative Statics and the Environmental Kuznets Curve’, Oxford Economic Papers, 53: 721–46.

While the determinants of demographic transition have been explored for more than half a century, far less attention has been given to the consequences of transition, aside from its immediate effect on population aging. Transition has major implications for family and kinship patterns, urbanization, public finance and the welfare state, and intergenerational relations.

It helps economic development and it retards economic development. To the Greek philosophers, about 2,500 years ago, population growth was undesirable as it adversely affects economic development. The relationship between population growth and economic development may be summarised in the words of Robert McNamara-the past president of the World Bank. He described it as ‘the most delicate and difficult issue of our er. t is overlaid with emotion. The myth of over-population causing underdevelopment should be given up in any analysis of economic development. It is not to be accepted that a slowing down of population increase might contribute substantially to our development prospects. So what is sauce for a goose may not be the sauce for a gander!

The titles published in this series are listed at the end of this volume. Department of Agriculture Washington, DC, USA and. David L. Brown Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. A .

Many countries in Africa are facing severe development problems because of high rates of population growth, stagnant or declining agricultural productivity, and increasing migration of the rural poor. Most demographic studies of Africa ignore problems arising from the spatial distribution of population and public allocation of investment. Strategic planning of the location of development investments in ways that will prevent or reduce excessive concentration of population and productive activities in large primary cities is becoming increasingly important for many African governments. Bureau of the Census. Friedmann, John and Michael Douglass (1978).

Moving walls are generally represented in years

Mobile version (beta). Dynamic Population Models (The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis). Download (pdf, . 6 Mb) Donate Read.

PDF Thinking about population as a driver of agricultural development provides insights into induced technical and institutional change, whether it be Esther Boserup's declining fallow period, modern crop varieties, or the specialization pyramid that arises in labor-intensive. Population and Agricultural Development. modelling sustainable development, however. Even if we abstract from technical change, expanding models of economic growth. to include environmental degradation does not produce a necessarily dismal outlook, however.