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ISBN:0751538582
Author: Robin Pilcher
ISBN13: 978-0751538588
Title: A Matter of Trust
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ePUB size: 1837 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Sphere (2010)

A Matter of Trust by Robin Pilcher



92 22. Personal Name: Pilcher, Robin. Publication, Distribution, et. London On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book A matter of trust, Robin Pilcher.

Written by Robin Pilcher, Audiobook narrated by Julia Franklin. Narrated by: John Lee. Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins.

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ru - Claire Barclay has returned to the home in Scotland where she spent her teenage years.

By (author) Robin Pilcher. Claire Barclay has returned to the home in Scotland where she spent her teenage years. After the sudden death of her mother, Claire is concerned about the welfare of her much-loved and now frail stepfather, Leo. But his own grown children seem more concerned about preserving their financial assets than their father’s health. Claire is desperately trying to avoid Jonas, the love of her life who broke her heart at just eighteen, but he’s asking her to trust him again, on a matter of urgency

The Long Way Home is Robin Pilcher at his best. The Long Way Home is Robin Pilcher at his best. I devoured every word of this masterful storyteller. Debbie Macomber, New York Times bestselling author In the vein of Maeve Binchy, Rosamunde Pilcher, and Nicholas Sparks, New York Times bestselling author Robin Pilcher returns with his most enchanting novel yet, filled with captivating twists and turns of heart.

item 1 Pilcher, Robin, A Matter Of Trust, Very Good Book -Pilcher, Robin, A Matter Of Trust, Very Good Book. item 2 "VERY GOOD" Pilcher, Robin, A Matter Of Trust, Book -"VERY GOOD" Pilcher, Robin, A Matter Of Trust, Book. Last oneFree postage. item 3 A matter of trust by Robin Pilcher (Hardback) -A matter of trust by Robin Pilcher (Hardback). item 4 A Matter of Trust By Robin Pilcher -A Matter of Trust By Robin Pilcher. Born in Dundee in 1950, Robin Pilcher is married with four children. He has been an assistant film cameraman, PR consultant and a farmer. Little, Brown Book Group.

A MATTER OF TRUST is reminiscent of the rich family sagas I read in my youth: finely drawn characters, an authentic setting, dramatic conflicts, and a thread of suspense that keeps the reader guessing. Mr. Pilcher writes with a light touch, effortlessly An absorbing read about the challenge of facing your past and bearing new responsibilities' WOMAN 'A pleasing family saga with just enough twists to keep you guessing' CHOICE show more.

Robin Pilcher didn't take up writing until he was 48 years old but he has made up for his late start by publishing many successful books. An Ocean Apart in 1999 was followed by Starting Over and A Risk Worth Taking and all three were adapted for television. His latest novel, A Matter of Trust has now been published in paperback. Robin picks the following five books: 1: Favourite Childhood Book: A HIGH WIND IN JAMAICA by Richard Hughes. 2: Life-Changing book: I HEARD THE OWL CALL MY NAME by Margaret Craven. 3: Favourite Reference Book: AA ROAD MAP OF THE BRITISH ISLES.

Claire Barclay has returned to the home in Scotland where she spent her teenage years. After the sudden death of her mother, Claire is concerned about the welfare of her much-loved and now frail stepfather, Leo. But his own grown children seem more concerned about preserving their financial assets than their father’s health. Claire is desperately trying to avoid Jonas, the love of her life who broke her heart at just 18, but he’s asking her to trust him again, on a matter of all urgency. Can she forget the past and put her faith in someone who once hurt her so deeply?
Reviews: 7
Pedora
Yikes. I tried to write a review of this right after I read it and found I was much too angry.

I read the first two or three Gamache books and found them quite interesting--certainly enough to read this one. But good golly it's bad -- at least not what I consider good story telling. And filled with artsy-fartsy b.s.

The biggest issue I had was at the end when I, even while rolling my eyes, shouted at Clara "don't go you moron!" Then at Myrna "don't let her go you moron!" And Myrna did, and Clara did, and the consequences were so grave, arguably because Clara had gone. And despite all the guilt that had been flying around the book up to this point, there was no acknowledgement of it whatsoever.

On the other hand, I could be me. But I can't possibly recommend this book.
Jia
Like others, I wanted to throw my Kindle across the room at the end. One thing I have learned about Ms. Penny's writing. You have to be willing to travel along the road of total ridiculousness and implausibility if you want to successfully navigate to the end of the book. Sometimes its OK because the overall story line is good. Sometimes (however) I just yell, "WHAT??" a lot. My first yelling event was book 2 or 3 when we were asked to blindly accept that a 12 year old girl gave her Mom excess caffeine so she would have a hot flash, pull off her gloves, touch a metal chair while standing in a puddle and be electrocuted. And you also have to accept that Ms. Penny will go on rants from time to time, sometimes lasting many pages, about things that leave you wondering, "What does this have to do with anything?" And the repetition! Yes we get that Gamache smells of sandalwood and rosewater. And Clara's hair, for heaven's sake. Despite the flaws, I have truly enjoyed some of the books. Loved the one set in Quebec City. Loved the past one with the shoot out at the end. But this was a total head-shaker. Worse than caffeine lady getting electrocuted by a lawn chair. What in the heck was all that nonsense about cosmic gardens, stone bunnies, muses, and asbestos? Sounds like an LSD trip to me. And the ending was so badly written. Peter really died of embarrassment. I really really want to love these books, but Ms. Penny has to meet me half-way. And please do something with Ruth's character other than making her a drunk duck woman. So much could be done with her. So bottom line, skip this one. Move on to the next. Don't throw the Kindle.
Unnis
I am a big Louise Penney fan and gave it three stars out of loyalty but, if this were the first novel about Inspector Gamache, it would have been my last. I have previously said that one thing I admired was that the author did not use "set phrases" or paragraphs that seem to have been "copied and pasted from previous books" for her descriptions and dialogue but that was not true in this book. Gamache frequently "grunted in laughter or in response"...sometimes three or four times a page. The characters are old friends of mine and I love them, but, this story is not interesting nor particularly coherent. I am not unhappy that I bought it, but am doubtful about the future of the series. These errors should have been picked up by the editors. Unless Gamache goes back to work and has a credible source for investigations, I fear the series is doomed to fanciful weak story lines such as this one.
Whitebeard
I adore Louise Penny! She seems to be a kind, warm, self-effacing person and she expresses herself beautifully. I've read all of her Gamache books and I very much wanted to be enthusiastic about this latest effort. But I'm not. The only real mystery is: Where is Peter? At a snail's pace, over-analyzing his every brushstroke and covering in exhaustive detail every step he had taken in his year of travels, the book has too little necessary action to move the plot forward, and it's a sliver of a plot at that. It reminds me of The Wizard of Oz, with four characters heading toward a hoped-for goal, getting directions from others along the way, meeting disappointments and pitfalls, and when they get there, the book is almost over with little to show for it. Too thin a reed on which to build a mystery novel, unfortunately.
Thorgahuginn
I started slowly on this series. In fact, I didn't really care for the first book initially. I returned after a year or so and found the characters the real reward. They are complex, interesting, and leave you curious for more. In this one, Inspector Gamache has retired to the tiny village of Three Pines. He's languishing on latte's, hot chocolate, fresh croissants and baguettes (I'm still salivating). If you know anything about food, you'll enjoy the dishes at the Bistro! Anyway, one artist is awaiting the return of her year-long-separated husband. He fails to show. She's not only stunned, but worried that something has happened to him. She enlists Gamache to help find him. Along the way, we meet an interesting Scottish detective, an art dealer, and other new characters that, something tells me, we may see again in the future. This isn't her strongest novel, but definitely worth the read.