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ISBN:1868141993
Author: Bernard A Wood
ISBN13: 978-1868141999
Title: Patterns of hominid evolution in Africa: Twenty-sixth Raymond Dart Memorial Lecture delivered 18 February 1988
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Publisher: Witwatersrand University Press for the Institute for the Study of Man in Africa (1993)
Pages: 34

Patterns of hominid evolution in Africa: Twenty-sixth Raymond Dart Memorial Lecture delivered 18 February 1988 by Bernard A Wood



Twenty-sixth Raymond Dart Memorial Lecture delivered 18 February 1988. by Ronsard e l'Italia, Ronsard in Italia : atti del 1? Convegno del Gruppo di studio sul Cinquecento francese, Gargnano, 16-18 ottobre 1986.

Patterns of hominid evolution in Africa. 26th Raymond Dart Memorial Lecture. Witwatersrand University Press. 86. 1994 ‘Hominid paleobiology: recent achievements and challenges’. In: Late Cenozoic Environments and Hominid Evolution: a tribute to Bill Bishop. Geological Society, London. Wood, B. and Collard, M. Science, 284: 65-71. 113. ‘Grades among the African early Hominins: Functions, Adaptations and Grades. Collard, M. and Wood, . In: African biogeography, climate change and early hominid evolution. Eds. T. Bromage and F. Schrenk, pp. 316-327.

Phylogenetic Tree of Hominid Evolution. Between 1886 and 1895 Dubois discovered remains that he later described as "an intermediate species between humans and monkeys".

Raymond Arthur Dart (4 February 1893 – 22 November 1988) was an Australian anatomist and anthropologist, best known for his involvement in the 1924 discovery of the first fossil ever found of Australopithecus africanus, an extinct hominid closely related to humans, at Taung in the North of South Africa in the province Northwest. As Dart was not part of the scientific establishment, and because he found the fossil in Africa, and not Europe or Asia, where the establishment supposed man's origins, his findings were initially dismissed. Ape to Man, History, 16 February 2011 Dart was right, and I was wrong".

Raymond A. Dart, in full Raymond Arthur Dart, (born February 4, 1893, Toowong, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia-died November 22, 1988, Johannesburg, South Africa), Australian-born South African physical anthropologist and paleontologist whose discoveries of fossil hominins (members of the human lineage) led to significant insights into human evolution  .

The Late Miocene and Early Pliocene hominin fossil record confirms Africa as the birthplace of humanity. Raymond Dart’s announcement of the first species of ‘ape-man’ in the journal Nature (Dart, 1925) forever changed our perceptions of Africa’s place in the ‘human story’ and firmly established the field of African palaeoanthropology. We s, past, present and future, owe a significant debt to Dart’s discovery and his recognition of its importance.

Raymond Dart was born in Toowong, a suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, the fifth of nine children and son of a farmer and tradesman. His birth occurred during the 1893 flood which filled his parents' home and shop in Toowong Dart's closest ally was Robert Broom whose discoveries of further Australopithecines (as well as Wilfrid Le Gros Clark's support) eventually vindicated Dart, so much so that in 1947 Sir Arthur Keith said . .Dart was right, and I was wrong". Dart spent much of the next twenty years working with the IAHP, an organization that treats brain injured children. His son, Galen Dart had suffered motor damage during birth in 1941. In 1924, Dart discovered the first fossil ever found of Australopithecus africanus, an extinct hominid closely related to humans, at Taung in North South Africa, in the province Northwest

Current Views of Hominid Evolution. From the discovery of the Taungs baby in South Africa in 1924 and its subsequent description by Raymond Dart, to the 1979 announcements of the new species Australopithecus afarensis, the new hybrid primate siabon, the discoveries of . millionyearold fossil hominid footprints, and of the earliest known fossil anthropoids, there has been a steady progression of major finds, new interpretations, and revisions. of manís thinking about his origins. Biology textbooks frequently relegate topics in evolution to the last chapters of the book, much the way that organic chemistry used to be an addendum to chemistry textbooks. This is unfortunate when one considers that evolution is one of the most substantiated of theories in the biological sciences, and that it is also one of the major unifying theories of biology.