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ISBN:1436771080
Author: Joseph Ritson
ISBN13: 978-1436771085
Title: An Essay On Abstinence From Animal Food, As A Moral Duty (1802)
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Language: English
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 29, 2008)
Pages: 240

An Essay On Abstinence From Animal Food, As A Moral Duty (1802) by Joseph Ritson



Animal food not natural to man. 41. Animal food not necessary. 57. Animal sod the cause of cru. 86. Animal food the cause of human. 124. Animal food pernicious. 146. Nations and individuals sub.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. Publication date 1802. Topics Vegetarianism. Publisher London, R. Phillips. Collection americana. Digitizing sponsor Google. Book from the collections of Harvard University. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into pri This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. Lists with This Book. Published in 1802, raising questions of animal rights, the relation of meat eating to psychology and violence, even st concerns.

In 1802, his An Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food, as a Moral Duty, was published by Sir Richard Phillips. Biographer Bertrand Harris Bronson has noted that based on excerpts from Ritson's daily journal his vegetarian diet consisted of muffins, cake, cheese, bread, butter, milk, beer and al. .Verses addressed to the Ladies of Stockton. First printed in the Newcastle Miscellany, MDCCLXXII, 1780. Observations on the three first volumes of the history of English poetry by T. W. in a letter to the author, by Thomas Warton and Joseph Ritson, 1782.

Joseph Ritson (1752-1803). Ritson was born in Stockton-on-Tees northern England. Not a lot is known of his early life. He published the reasons for his vegetarianism in An Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food, as a Moral Duty (1802). He was also an atheist. When he died, for instance, he was in the middle of completing a tract that attempted to prove that Jesus Christ was an imposter. Indeed, throughout his life he was known to have told his associates that: He did not believe that there was any such being as Almighty God, or that there was any future state of rewards or punishment, and the greatest devil he knew was a nasty, crabbed, ill-natured old woman.

Vol. 12, Issue 1. pp. 52–61. Pope, Alexander, "Against Barbarity to Animals," The Guardian, No. 61. 1713.

William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, III, i, 78–80, quoted in Joseph Ritson, An Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food, as a Moral Duty, p. 501. The antiquarian Joseph Ritson (1752–1803, see fig. 1) opposed the bibliographical practices of his rival, Thomas Percy. Thomas Percy’s copy of An Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food (1802) contains Sayer’s satirical cartoon of him pasted onto the front board. In it, Ritson is treading on the Bible (and Percy’s Reliques) in open-toed sandals while a cow leans through the window, breaking the boundary between human and animal realms, and munches on one of Ritson’s carrots. In real life, Ritson had a dog whom he called – Ritson. The 1960s, it seems, had happened before.

An essay on abstinence from animal food as a moral duty. The office of a bailiff of a liberty, ed. J. Frank. The Caledonian muse: a chronological selection. The life of King Arthur from ancient historians, ed. Memoirs of the Celts or Gauls. Annals of the Caledonians, PIcts and Scots. Letters from Joseph Ritson to Mr. George Paton. Fairy tales, now first collected; to which are prefixed two dissertations. The letters of Ritson, ed.

For example, in "An Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food as a Moral Duty" (1802), Joseph Ritson (1752-1803) wrote of a family's diet: "their provision is chiefly oatmeal, potatoes, milk, and butter - no animal food whatever". Graham also claimed "primitive inhabitants of the earth subsisted entirely on vegetable food, and lived to a very great age". When using this phrase he meant to "comprehend all fruits and farinaceous seeds and roots, and other kinds of esculent vegetables proper for human aliment" A 1910 book on the history of medicine presented a selection of his stances: "anti-tobacco, anti-drink, anti-flesh-eating, anti-salt, anti-drugging, anti-slavery, anti-vaccination, anti-vivisection".

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.