Download Burnt Orange Heresy epub book
ISBN:0887390250
Author: Charles Willeford
ISBN13: 978-0887390258
Title: Burnt Orange Heresy
Format: lrf azw docx lit
ePUB size: 1500 kb
FB2 size: 1447 kb
DJVU size: 1245 kb
Language: English
Category: Thrillers and Suspense
Publisher: Creative Arts Book Company; New edition edition (August 18, 1987)
Pages: 160

Burnt Orange Heresy by Charles Willeford



Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Bush Doctor's Bride.

The Burnt Orange Heresy. Author: Charles Willeford. Publication date: 1971. Fast-talking, backstabbing, womanizing art critic Jacques Figueras will do anything - blackmail, burglary, fencing, assassination - to further his career

The Burnt Orange Heresy is a mean read, with shocks and twists galore. Some of the plot seems a bit far-fetched, but Williford writes so skillfully that the book withstands this flaw beautifully. Williford also has a real eye for detail and takes great advantage of the Miami and Florida settings. Overall, I highly recommended this novel, especially for fans of noir writers (. Chandler, Jim Thompson). However despite its originality (at the time it was written) and overall quality I found myself curiously bored by it all. Why?

The Burnt Orange Heresy book. The burnt orange heresy. We learn early on that a specific crime is to be committed. An art critic – an expert on modern art – is approached by a wealthy lawyer friend of his with a proposal. The lawyer wants a painting by a reclusive artist of the time who has managed to keep his work and life hidden from the rest of the world. The artist, named Debiarue, has, so far as anyone knows, has only painted one work. He has allowed the world to see that work, though THE BURNT ORANGE HERESY. We learn early on that a specific.

The Burnt Orange Heresy is an upcoming Italian-American drama thriller film directed by Giuseppe Capotondi and written by Scott Smith. It is based on the book of same name by Charles Willeford. Claes Bang as James Figueras. Elizabeth Debicki as Berenice Hollis. Mick Jagger as Joseph Cassidy. Donald Sutherland as Jerome Debney. Alessandro Fabrizi as Rodolfo.

The Burnt Orange Heresy is a change of pace for Willeford. The story is told by Jacques James Figueras, a Puerto-Rican American, who’s an ambitious art critic. Every aspect of James’s life is geared towards becoming the greatest art critic in America–and perhaps the world. Willeford was a strange character, and at one time in his checkered career, he enrolled in the graduate Art programme at a university in Lima, Peru, but was thrown out when it was discovered that he didn’t possess an undergraduate degree. Well I’ve read three Willeford novels so far–all different and all excellent. If you like noir novels at the edge of twisted, then Willeford comes highly recommended.

Author: Charles Willeford. Fast-talking, backstabbing, womanizing art critic Jacques Figueras will do anything - blackmail, burglary, fencing, assassination - to further his career. Crossing the art world with the underworld, Willeford expands his noir palette to include hues of sunny Florida and weird tints of Surrealism when Figueras takes a job for an art collector who doesn't care how his art is collected, even if it involves murder. by Charles Willeford. If anything exists, it is incomprehensible. If anything was comprehensible, it would be incommunicable. And Fine Arts: The Americas, which loses more than fifty thousand dollars a year for the foundation that supports it, is easily the most successful art magazine published in America-or anywhere else, for that matter

A new paperback edition of the neo-noir novel book critics have called Willeford's best. Fast-talking, backstabbing, womanizing art critic Jacques Figueras will do anything - blackmail, burglary, fencing, assassination - to further his career. Crossing the art world with the underworld, Willeford expands his noir palette to include hues of sunny Florida and weird tints of Surrealism when Figueras takes a job for an art collector who doesn't care how his art is collected, even if it involves murder.
Reviews: 7
Nettale
This is my first exposure to Charles Willeford's work and what I read is not exactly a crime novel. Oh, there's a murder victim here, arson, theft. But what it is is a take on the art world: critics, artists, collectors, and their sphere of existence.

Jacques Figueras is the art critic pushed into stealing from a reclusive painter.

First Willeford, but not likely my last.
Delalbine
This is the classic work here. Hard to get a hold of and what the internet is for. GET IT!
Kulafyn
This was my first Willeford book. I will now read more.
Irostamore
James Figueras is a talented and ambitious Miami art critic who has been slowly working his way toward the top of his field. He's always on the lookout for opportunities for advancement, although he likes to consider himself a basically honest professional. One night at an art gallery opening, he gets a shocking proposal from a mysterious lawyer, Joseph Cassidy. Cassidy has managed to gain the acquaintance of a legendary French painter, Jacques Debierue, who is so reclusive that his work hasn't been seen in decades. Interviewing Debierue would be a major, career-defining coup for Figueras, and he's prepared to do anything to get the information from Cassidy. However, when he hears Cassidy's proposal, Figueras has his doubts....
Many of Charles Williford's novels have gone out of print, which is unfortunate as his writing stands with the best noir writers. The Burnt Orange Heresy is a mean read, with shocks and twists galore. Some of the plot seems a bit far-fetched, but Williford writes so skillfully that the book withstands this flaw beautifully. Williford also has a real eye for detail and takes great advantage of the Miami and Florida settings. Overall, I highly recommended this novel, especially for fans of noir writers (e.g., Chandler, Jim Thompson).
Umi
Best known for his Hoke Moseley novels, Willeford was also a painter. Here he brings the art world to a crime novel and renders a work that is sort of Crime and Punishment as rewritten by James M. Cain and Tom Wolfe.
James Figueras is a low rent art critic. He's wangled a posting to Palm Beach but he's saddled with dim prospects and an annoying girlfriend, Berenice Hollis. He's on the lookout for his one big break and it comes when he receives information that one of the most influential, but enigmatic, artists of the Twentieth Century has moved to Florida. A big collector offers to tell him where to find the artist, Jacques Debierue, if he'll steal one of the artist's works in exchange for the information.
In addition to a deftly rendered crime novel, Willeford proceeds to treat us to a devastatingly funny send up of Modern Art and the pseudo-intellectual theories that spawned it.
A hoot.
roternow
I wish I can give 'The Burnt Orange Heresy' the same sort of glowing review the others have posted. However despite its originality (at the time it was written) and overall quality I found myself curiously bored by it all. Why? Well...
The story is certainly bizarre. A rather obnoxious art critic is obsessed with getting a glimpse of paintings by a living art legend who happens to be a recluse. No one has seen this fellow's work in decades. Our art critic will stop at nothing to get what he wants. Think deceit, betrayal and murder and you've got the right idea. Sadly, I think such art critics actually exist in this world. ;-)
But Willeford unfortunately devotes too much time during most of the book blathering on about the art world: competitiveness between critics/reviewers, different styles of art during the last century, and how to judge the quality of art. For this reader, who couldn't give a monkey's about art, became quite bored with it all. Towards the end when the story picked up I was too disengaged to really appreciate the shock/horror of our art critic from hell.
...Bottom line: perhaps best left for those who truly hate art critics and love Charles Willeford.
Zorve
I found this book quite enjoyable. The main character is not likable, but he is interesting. His girl is (to me) irritating. But that makes the whole thing a good read. After all, if we wanted happy, we'd read something else.

Some call Willeford's writing dry, but I find it clean, refreshing and subtle at times without being dry or dull.

If you like any type of noir, I would definitely give this a shot.
In this short novel, Willeford mercilessly satirizes the contemporary art scene, and succeeds in deflating the pretensions of a certain type of artist and the bombastic critical establishment that supports his or her "art." Intermixed with Willeford's dry but devastating satire is a kind of gritty portrayal of the main character, an American art critic and near-psychopath named James Figueras. To enjoy the book, you will probably have to simultaneously like Willeford's focus on the seamier side of life, and regard much of contemporary art and its critics as deserving of being lampooned.