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ISBN:0199555435
Author: Henry James
ISBN13: 978-0199555437
Title: The Wings of the Dove (Oxford World's Classics)
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ePUB size: 1972 kb
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Language: English
Category: Mystery
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (August 31, 2009)
Pages: 592

The Wings of the Dove (Oxford World's Classics) by Henry James



Book Jacket Status: Jacketed). Of the three late masterpieces that crown the extraordinary literary achievement of Henry James, The Wings of the Dove (1902) is at once the most personal and the most elemental. James drew on the memory of a beloved cousin who died young to create one of the three central characters, Milly Theale, an heiress with a short time to live and a passion for experiencing life to its fullest. The density of the prose isn't Henry James trying to be difficult. This is an author (probably in many conversations and correspondences with his brother, the great psychologist William James) determined to express the very complicated psychology of complex human beings, a psychology that steps forward and backward and sideways.

Henry James (1843-1916), son of Henry James Sr. and brother of the philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James, was an American-born author and literary critic of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He spent much of his life in Europe and became a British subject shortly before his death. Some have remarked that the books of James's later period (to which The Wings of the Dove belongs) are more obscure and harder to read than his earlier books but I disagree. I don't think The Wings of the Dove is any more difficult to read and understand than A Portrait of a Lady (a novel of his 'social' period) and it is (for me at least ) far more rewarding. 6 people found this helpful.

Category: Classics, Literature & Fiction, United States, Literary. For Milly Theale, who seems to have the world before her and at her feet, is fatally ill. Eager for life, eager for love, she embarks on her European adventure, warming to the admiration of her new friends Kate Croy and Merton Densher.

Wings of the Dove (Signet Classics) Tandem Library, School & Library Binding, 1999. The Wings of the Dove Blackstone Audiobooks, Audio Cassette, 1999. The Wings of the Dove (Oxford World's Classics) Oxford University Press, USA, Paperback, 1998. The Wings of the Dove (The Novels and Tales of Henry James, Part 2) Augustus M Kelley Pubs, Hardcover, 1969. The Wings of the Dove is a classic example of Henry James's morality tales that play off the naivet� of an American protagonist abroad. In early-20th-century London, Kate Croy and Merton Densher are engaged in a passionate, clandestine love affair.

Oxford: Clarendon Press and New York: Oxford University Press, 1990. Matthiessen, F. O. The James Family. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947. Henry James and John Hay: The Record of a Friendship. Providence, RI: Brown University Press, 1965. Moore, Harry T. Henry James. bi Brompton Oratory, a Roman Catholic church offering informal services; opened in 1884. Henry James, The Wings of the Dove. Series: ) Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

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For Milly Theale, who seems to have the world before her and at her feet, is fatally ill.

This page contains details about the Fiction book Wings of the Dove by Henry James published in 1902. This book is the 516th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

Confronting a Bronzino portrait in an English country house, a young American heiress comes face to face with her own predicament. For Milly Theale, who seems to have the world before her and at her feet, is fatally ill. Eager for life, eager for love, she embarks on her European adventure, warming to the admiration of her new friends Kate Croy and Merton Densher. But Merton and Kate are secretly engaged, and come to see in this angel with a thumping bank account as a solution to their own problems. For the remarkable Kate, scheming, passionate, poetic, also wants to live... This edition of James's poignant and dramatic novel is based on the revised New York Edition. The cover pictures the Bronzino portrait which is the focus of the key scene in the book.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Reviews: 7
Mr_KiLLaURa
Five stars means I loved it, but not the first time through. If I hadn't had some moral obligation to finish it, I doubt I would have. The prose is as dense as The Master gets, and that's jungle-thick. The second time through, I began to see why it has earned the praise it has as one of Henry James's great novels. By the third time through, I thought it was brilliant, and would gladly read it a fourth time, and more. But like most great works of art, it doesn't yield up its rewards easily.

The density of the prose isn't Henry James trying to be difficult. This is an author (probably in many conversations and correspondences with his brother, the great psychologist William James) determined to express the very complicated psychology of complex human beings, a psychology that steps forward and backward and sideways . No character is just one thing: a conniving money-grubber, a social-climbing heiress, a thwarted lover, a very rich American naif. Each of these characters reveals layer upon layer of contradictory motives, second and third thoughts, unexpected generosities. Several of them are troubled by the ethics of their motives, and the final pages will leave you wondering whose ethics will prevail.

But that's as James intended. "I honor George Eliot above all other novelists," he said, "but she tells too much." Henry James, for all his words, makes you, the reader, complete his late novels.
Zolorn
Reading Henry James takes effort. His allusive, complex style (someone once compared it to a hippopotamus trying to pick up a pea) requires constant attention on the part of the reader to stay on top of the narrative. Most of the 'action' takes place in the interior thoughts and feelings of the characters in their interactions with each other. The plot could be summed up in a sentence and is almost irrelevant. A James novel is all about character and its slow revelation through the flickering light of his indirect prose. As his brother William James rightly pointed out, you have to read every word to get the full effect (even harder for us modern types with our short attention spans) but the full effect is worth it. At the end of the day, you get a fragile but extremely powerful impression of the three main characters; Milly Theale, the rich American heiress who is dying; Kate Croy the beautiful, amoral schemer ('full of life') who sees a way to secure her and her lover's future through Milly's money; and last, Merton Densher who is passionately in love with Kate and led by her to pose as a suitor to Milly in order to gain her money after she dies.

A sordid plot but James manages to elevate the whole thing to art. Every character gets his/her full consideration, even Kate who is not a 'good' woman but not completely bad either. She is a dutiful daughter and sister to people who see her as their ticket out of poverty and care little about what happens to her in the process. The heroine Milly Theale is the character who emerges least clearly from the novel (at least for me), probably because she is so good she seems (to me) more like a fantasy or an ideal than a real person.

Milly's illness is a key plot point since it is the anchor on which the rest turns so I found it kind of amusing how James elides over the subject. We never even know what disease she has; the closest we come to knowing anything is when the doctor says it is not tuberculosis, a curious statement when you think about it. It doesn't really help to know what she doesn't have but then again this is the 19th century (when the novel takes place) and doctors didn't have many diagnostic tools. Even so, Milly's interview with her doctor is one of the more curious in fiction since it never seems to approach a clinical diagnosis but is rather the sort of conversation that might have taken place in the intervals at an opera house. (James remarks in his introduction that he doesn't want to dwell on Milly's illness, that it is not the subject of the book but rather her intense desire to live so perhaps that is why.)

Anyway this is a marvelous book which well repays the effort of reading it. Some have remarked that the books of James's later period (to which The Wings of the Dove belongs) are more obscure and harder to read than his earlier books but I disagree. I don't think The Wings of the Dove is any more difficult to read and understand than A Portrait of a Lady (a novel of his 'social' period) and it is (for me at least ) far more rewarding.
Redfury
This story is simply superb, in every way. It is possibly the best America novel.
Read what Harold Bloom has to say about Kate and Milly, but give Densher a little more
credit. He grows from weakness to strength == but form your own view.
I will reread this book -- it is so finely nuanced.
Vikus
James does very well when he talks about death, as he does most frankly in The Wings of the Dove and The Princess Casamassima. For readers who find Henry James too bloodless for their tastes, these two books might be the antidote. James likes to ruminate. He also likes to throw veils of ambiguity over everything. When the central character of the book is bound to die from the very beginning, what you end up with is a book where death waits around every cover, and hovers on every page. A pretty fun read. I prefer Casamassima because it's a little more readable and I like James' attempt to portray the lower class. But for consistency and evenness, this one can't be beaten.
Uylo
One keeps hoping to find out the fate of the characters even though it means plowing through the most convoluted, abstruse sentence structure ever created. No one EVER comes right out and says anything, they just talk around it. It's maddening and I'm glad I'm finally finished!