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ISBN:1410407160
Author: Louise Penny
ISBN13: 978-1410407160
Title: The Cruelest Month (Three Pines Mysteries, No. 3)
Format: lit rtf mbr txt
ePUB size: 1621 kb
FB2 size: 1338 kb
DJVU size: 1128 kb
Language: English
Category: Mystery
Publisher: Thorndike Pr (June 4, 2008)
Pages: 615

The Cruelest Month (Three Pines Mysteries, No. 3) by Louise Penny



On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The cruelest month : a Three Pines mystery, Louise Penny.

Which Three Pines villager would you most like to have cafe au lait with at the bistro? 3. Why is Ruth a villager? 4 Louise Penny says her books are about murder, but at their heart they're about other things. Reading Group Questions for THE BRUTAL TELLING 1. A theme in this book, and many of Louise's books, is the difference between "truth" and "opinion. Discussion questions for The Cruelest Month 1. We’re told that Three Pines is only ever found by people lost. In what way are Peter and Clara, Ruth, Myrna, Gabri and Olivier, and even Gamache and his team of investigators, lost people? 2. Early in the story, when Peter is looking at Clara’s unfinished painting: He suddenly felt something grab him.

Publication date 2008. Topics Gamache, Armand (Fictitious character), Police, Villages, Easter stories, Seances, Traitors. Publisher New York : St. Martin's Minotaur. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. ENCRYPTED DAISY download.

Welcome to Three Pines, where the cruelest month is about to deliver on its threat. It's spring in the tiny, forgotten village; buds are on the trees and the first flowers are struggling through the newly thawed earth. But not everything is meant to return to life. When some villagers decide to celebrate Easter with a séance at the Old Hadley House, they are hoping to r Welcome to Three Pines, where the cruelest month is about to deliver on its threat. Mystery plotting is likely the weakest part of the book. Ganache is no Poirot, using the little grey cells to piece together the events of the night and the characters of all involved.

Find nearly any book by Louise Penny (page 3). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Dead Cold (Chief Inspector Gamache Book 2). by Louise Penny.

A Three Pines Mystery (Three Pines Mysteries). No one has a harsh word to say about Madeleine, but Gamache knows there's more to the case than meets the eye. Complicating his inquiry are the repercussions of Gamache having accused his popular superior at the Sûreté du Québec of heinous crimes in a previous case. Fearing there might be a mole on his team, Gamache works not only to solve the murder but to clear his name.

Welcome to Three Pines, where the cruelest month is about to deliver on its threat. It's spring in the tiny, forgotten village; buds are on the trees, and the first flowers are struggling through the newly thawed earth. When some villagers decide to celebrate Easter with a séance at the Old Hadley House, they are hoping to rid the town of its evil - until one of their party dies of fright.

A Fatal Grace (Three Pines Mysteries, No. 2). Louise Penny. Download (EPUB). Читать. The Brutal Telling: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novels). Still Life: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel (Three Pines Mysteries - Book 1).

Summary: When a group from Three Pines decides to have a séance to purge the evil spirits of the Hadley house, one of the participants appears to die of fright. I know some people like to be scared by books or movies or TV shows, I am not one of those people. I have never read a Stephen King novel, I don’t watch horror movies, I won’t watch Walking Dead no matter how many people tell me that I will like it. So I was put off by the early part of the book

"Many mystery buffs have credited Louise Penny with the revival of the type of traditional murder mystery made famous by Agatha Christie. . . . The book's title is a metaphor not only for the month of April but also for Gamache's personal and professional challenges---making this the series standout so far." --Sarah Weinman Welcome to Three Pines, where the cruelest month is about to deliver on its threat. It's spring in the tiny, forgotten village; buds are on the trees and the first flowers are struggling through the newly thawed earth. But not everything is meant to return to life. . . When some villagers decide to celebrate Easter with a seance at the Old Hadley House, they are hoping to rid the town of its evil---until one of their party dies of fright. Was this a natural death, or was the victim somehow helped along? Brilliant, compassionate Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Surete du Quebec is called to investigate, in a case that will force him to face his own ghosts as well as those of a seemingly idyllic town where relationships are far more dangerous than they seem.
Reviews: 7
ZEr0
Louise Penny's books, set in Québec, have such a sense of place that they could not be set in Ontario, British Columbia, or the Maritimes. Once again in The Cruelest Month, the almost-fairy-tale village of Three Pines is the setting for a murder case and Gamache and his team return to solve it. But besides the murder -- which at first looks like something supernatural -- Gamache is dealing with the continuing blowback from what we might call an Internal Affairs case that occurred before the first book in the series. Whom can he trust among his team and his colleagues? This mystery was, for me, harder to solve than the murder of Madeleine Favreau in Three Pines. I was pretty sure who the murderer was, but the continual harassment of Gamache and his family had one surprise for me at the end. Gamache is a bit of a philosopher and fits well in Three Pines, where nearly every character has something important to say about life, art, or love. I came late to the enjoyment of Louise Penny's work, and that's a good thing because I still have nine books left to read. Very highly recommended.v
Steamy Ibis
In a literary landscape of detective murder mystery’s where the protagonist is hard bitten, atheistic and cynical, and holds these values as virtues, it has always been refreshing to come across another Louise Penny novel. She infuses Her books with grace, friendship and life’ joys. Both her settings and her style can best be described as pastoral—As far as you can get from the gritty LA or New York most readers are familiar with. In this book her descriptions of the scenes sparkle, and the conversations between her characters are remarkably alive, witty and consisting of a great deal of the kind of subtext that you find in conversations of close friends. The quality of writing is a very high – – I came across more passages that I immediately wanted to read out loud to someone than in any of her other books I have read. This is a wonderful thing to come across these books, and I plan on reading as many as I can as long as she will write them.
EROROHALO
The Inpector Gamache books are so well written, it's a pleasure to read them. Not your normal kindle editions with multiple editorial, grammatical & punctuational errors. The plots always offer multiple conclusions, so one is hard pressed to guess the perpetrator until the ending. This book had a couple of surprises to it, making it even better once the book was finished.
Many people complain about the French phrases interspersed throughout; one has to remember that this series is about Quebec, Quebecoise & a town where folks are bilingual. To me, it just adds to the authenticity of the locale.
Loved it!
Painwind
I am very captivated by this series of novels. I feel like I know the characters with all their quirks. The stories are each independent but there is a thread of continuity running through them. I liked the first two just a tad better than this one, but I'll be ordering number 4. Incidentally, Louise Penny has a large, very loyal fan base that has traveled to Canada to celebrate her books with her. I heard about this on the PBS Newshour and it led me to buy the first one in the series.
Ustamya
Love all of Louise Penny's books. This is another "keeper". Not only do you get a great story but you can almost see the village in your mind's eye (at least I can) and the characters are wonderful. Such a good, satisfying, read.
Clandratha
Another home run for Louise Penny. Her mysteries are suspenseful, emotional, and unique, and of course, this one was no exception. Armand Gamache is a totally exceptional detective, and yet also a regular guy. And Three Pines is so real to me, I just know I could find it, even if it isn't on a map! Loved this book, as I have all the rest. Of course, the next one in the series is a positive must!
Flash_back
I started reading these books not in order but found them on special kindle emails. This is my fourth book and have gotten into all of them exquisitely written detail perfect I had been transformed to This magical world. Until this story - I felt it was too detailed getting off the track, I found myself speed reading to finish and find out the killer. And it saddened me Gamanche's troubles were from some Shakesperian tragedy which over took the murder story. I will keep on reading this series the pros far out weigh the cons.
I enjoyed this installment substantially more than the first two. The building Arnot story line is what interests me most about this series, and the development of that plot kept me going throughout, negating the somewhat boring “coziness” of the murder mystery. Thus, this book was “less cozy” than its predecessors and a bit more intense. For the past couple of books, Gamache has seemed pretty untouchable and somewhat static, but this book develops his character further by showing his true skills as a detective and playing on his insecurities and fears concerning the repercussions of the Arnot case.

My favorite aspect of this installment was watching the development of those around Gamache, specifically his fellow Surete officers, watching how they responded to the events of the story, how they responded to Gamache’s actions, and what choices they made concerning the main themes of the novel. A lot of the characters who have seemed minor and occasionally insignificant are given greater depth, and to me, that represents a (successful) attempt to continually enrich the cast of the series, preparing them for events to come.

I did find the murder mystery to be a bit weaker than the ones in the previous two books, but that may have been because it was overshadowed by the more serious and tenser Arnot plot line — the stakes were far higher for the latter, and they revolved around the central character, whereas the murder mystery fell a little flat, revolving around a few minor characters that held little interest for me.

Overall, I think the series is finally picking up a bit, although I do wish the murder mystery had a bit more substance. And maybe a sense of danger.