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ISBN:0754035220
Author: Josephine Tey
ISBN13: 978-0754035220
Title: A Shilling for Candles
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ePUB size: 1233 kb
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Language: English
Category: Mystery
Publisher: Chivers Press; Large type edition edition (September 1999)
Pages: 358

A Shilling for Candles by Josephine Tey



A 1930s comedy thriller by Josephine Tey, dramatised by John Fletcher. The independent-minded daughter of a chief police constable meets a suspected killer on the run. With Steve Hodson, Stephen Thorne, Ben Crowe, Harry Myers, Geoffrey Whitehead. Frances Jeater and Priyanga Elan. Dramatised by John Fletcher. Directed by Tabitha Potts. Tisdall: Giles Fagan. Pottinger: Steve Hodson. Bergoine: Stephen Thorne. Albert Clay: Harry Myers. Hopgood: Geoffrey Whitehead. Martha: Frances Jeater.

Автор: Tey Josephine, Книга: A Shilling for Candles, Серия: Alan Grant, Жанр: исторический детектив. Chapter 1. It was a little after seven on a summer morning, and William Potticary was taking his accustomed way over the short down grass of the cliff-top.

A Shilling For Candles. About book: All his life he had been no poor hater, Toselli. As commis he had hated the maitre maitre d’hôtel, as maitre d’hôtel he had hated the management, as the management he hated many things: the chef, wet weather, his wife, the head porter’s mustache, clients who demanded to see him at breakfast time-oh, many things! But more than all he hated the police. They were bad for business and bad for the digestion. It stopped his digestive juices flowing just to see one of them walk in through the glass doors.

Josephine Tey. A Shilling for Candles. Publication date: 1936. Beneath the sea cliffs of the south coast, suicides are a sad but common fact. Yet even the hardened coastguard knows something is wrong when a beautiful young film actress is found lying dead on the beach one morning. Inspector Grant has to take a more professional attitude: death by suicide, however common, has to have a motive - just like murder.

A Shilling for Candles book. And the only clue they have is a button. Once again, Josephine Tey writes a classically woven whodunit with threads of different colors and lengths loosely throwing menace and mayhem in many different directions. As the story proceeds, those threads are gathered tighter and tighter until a design starts to appear. This was a very enjoyable read – light, but with sufficient heft to set my detecting urges on a jog.

Josephine Tey was the pen name of a Scotswoman who is almost as mysterious as her books. A Shilling for Candles is enjoyable, largely because Tey writes lively and direct prose and creates some great characters. Grant is intelligent and thoughtful, but he's not perfect. I think a real triumph of this book is the way Tey explores celebrity and brings alive the character of the victim, Christine Clay, who is dead when we first meet her. There are no flashbacks or revealing letters hidden by the murder victim and then later discovered; Christine Clay is revealed (and, sometimes, hidden) through the reminisces of her theatrical colleagues, her husband, people she knew as a child, and-the only direct evidence we have from her-through her will and a codicil.

Tey Josephine (EN) - A Shilling for Candles. Must have come from inland somewhere. Not time for that," Potticary objected. She hadn't been that long in the water. Must have been drowned hereabouts.

Reviews: 7
Lanionge
Josephine Tey was the pen name of a Scotswoman who is almost as mysterious as her books. Living in a time when being reclusive was easier than it is now, she maintained a relentlessly low profile until her death in 1952 at the age of 56. Starting in 1929, she wrote four plays and published eight decidedly off-beat mystery novels. Five of the mysteries feature Inspector Alan Grant, a pretty mysterious guy himself. THE DAUGHTER OF TIME is generally considered to be her masterpiece, with THE FRANCHISE AFFAIR a close second. Some mystery-formula purists look down their noses at ALL of her work. It's safe to say that writing the perfectly plotted mystery was never a priority for her. She was more interested in people and her characters reflect it.

Many of her characters seem (on first viewing) to be stock or stereotypical characters. "A Freedy Lloyd part," is Robert Tisdall's quick summing up of the bluff, hunting', shooting' Chief Constable. But there's always some basis for stereotypes or they wouldn't exist and Tey's characters always turn out to have more to them than meets the eye.

The theme of this book is that of a stone dropped into the water. From the time that a young woman's body is pulled from the surf of a lonely beach in Kent, lives are affected. When it becomes known that the woman was the famous stage and screen actress Christine Clay, the ripple effect becomes international.

There's certainly no shortage of suspects. The likable young playboy who's been staying at her cottage is in the line-up. He's the "right sort" but tells a very fishy story. The songwriter who's reputed to have been her lover is lurking. Who knows what motives HE might have. The will mentions her next-of-kin, a brother to whom she has left only "a shilling for candles." Doesn't sound like a happy family, does it? And her husband (always a good bet for a wife's murder) is an aristocrat who dabbles in foreign politics and who has an iron-clad alibi. Or does he?

Inspector Grant of Scotland Yard must sort through it all and try to figure out if Christine Clay's sudden, violent death was really "written in the stars" as claimed by celebrity astrologer Lydia Keats. Since this is the second of the Inspector Grant series, we get to know some regulars - the stolid, but shrewd Sergeant Williams, elegant Marta Hallard who's Grant's unofficial consultant on the London entertainment scene, and reporter Jammy Hopkins who's less interested in getting the facts than in getting his reader's attention. The Chief Constable's strong-minded daughter becomes involved and plays a pivotal role in solving the mystery. Today a sixteen-year-old female is a young woman (if not a single mother!) but in rural England in 1936, a sheltered upper class teenaged girl is a "child" and both her father and Inspector Grant seem to think she'll be one for some time to come.

Tey's writing is lively and full of humor and the range and quirkiness of her characters is unmatched. Even six decades after her death, she has such a devoted following that new novels featuring her as a character are brisk sellers. Not bad!
Samowar
I've always loved The Daughter of Time, but I hadn't read any of Tey's other Alan Grant mysteries. A Shilling for Candles is enjoyable, largely because Tey writes lively and direct prose and creates some great characters. Grant is intelligent and thoughtful, but he's not perfect. He has a healthy respect for imagination but that imagination consistently takes into account the facts. Erica Burgoyne is another interesting character; she's a teenager who is independent and lives a bit in her own head. The reader gets the impression that she is socially awkward and doesn't have a lot of friends her own age. But her independence and self-confidence (which are never precious or precocious) lead to an important turning point in Grant's investigation. And Grant's genuine liking of Erica, and his appreciation of her ideas and actions, makes him a more endearing character.

I think a real triumph of this book is the way Tey explores celebrity and brings alive the character of the victim, Christine Clay, who is dead when we first meet her. There are no flashbacks or revealing letters hidden by the murder victim and then later discovered; Christine Clay is revealed (and, sometimes, hidden) through the reminisces of her theatrical colleagues, her husband, people she knew as a child, and--the only direct evidence we have from her--through her will and a codicil. Yet somehow, as the mystery draws to a close, I felt that I had gotten to know and like Christine, and that her death was a cruel and pointless thing.

The resolution of the mystery does rely on Grant's discovery of some last-minute clues that are indicated to, but not shared with, the reader. That irritates me a bit; part of the fun of a mystery is learning along with the detective, and seeing if you put the clues together to get to the same result. It feels like a bit of a cheat to have the detective learn something that isn't shared with the reader, but which is the key to revealing the murderer. Still, this is an enjoyable and satisfying read.
Gholbimand
I read this book shortly after reading Tey’s Brat Farrar, and while they’re both fine mysteries, Brat is the superior of the two. Both books involve murders that take place by the sea, and both appear to have similar motives, jealousy and resentment. However, what disappoints about this mystery is that the murderer is such a shocking surprise. Until the very end, the reader has no reason to even remotely suspect the perpetrator.

The novel opens with the murder of a superstar, an wildly successful actress and the wife of a wealthy man. Whodunit? Was it Herbert Gotobed, her estranged brother who attempted to thwart her happiness and development when they were children? Or could it have been her husband? Or what about Robin Tisdall, the young man who had been staying with her in a cottage for a few days?

Inspector Grant of Scotland Yard gets on the case right away, and soon there are plot twists, escapes, and possibilities too many to mention. Fortunately, the inspector has Erica Burgoyne, and interesting and smart young woman, to assist (uninvited) with the investigation. She’s quite an interesting character, as is Jammy Hopkins, the newspaper reporter. In fact, one of Tey’s strength is character development. Not only can the reader see and hear the characters, but she can pretty much guess what they might say or do next.

I won’t spoil the ending for you. I must say, however, that the inspector and his assistant went on some unnerving and unexpected side trips to locate Christine Clay’s murderer, and when they arrested him/her, it was a total surprise. If there was a clue, I missed it.