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ISBN:1554684080
Author: Howard Engel
ISBN13: 978-1554684083
Title: Man Who Forgot How To Read
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ePUB size: 1152 kb
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Language: English
Category: Psychology
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers (December 23, 2008)
Pages: 192

Man Who Forgot How To Read by Howard Engel



HOWARD ENGEL (Author, "The Man Who forgot How To Read"): I'm glad to be here. CONAN: And on realizing that they'd had a stroke, many people might panic. You write that instead you felt an almost unnatural calm. Mr. ENGEL: Yes, though I think it was part of the condition. You only - I was only aware of a disability when I actually needed it. If I didn't know that I had forgotten my name until I had to tell somebody my name or my address or other things. CONAN: Talking with Howard Engel about his book "The Man Who Forgot How to Read. And if you'd like to join the conversation, 8089-8255. org, and you're listening to Talk of the Nation from NPR News. And let's talk now with Pete. And Pete's on the line with us from Oswego in New York. PETE (Caller): Hello.

My name is howard engel. I write detective stories. After a time we read all of the Howard Pyle books about King Arthur and the Round Table. I was astonished, years later, to learn that my earliest reading coincided exactly with that of the writer Mary McCarthy. As she once told a group at Harbourfront’s reading series, this early reading shaped her interest in writing. It hit me the same way, not so many years later. When I was little, I loved being read to, of course, like most children.

Start by marking The Man Who Forgot How To Read as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. One hot mid-summer morning in Toronto, bestselling crime novelist Howard Engel got up to fetch his morning paper and discovered he could no longer read it. The letters had mysteriously jumbled themselves into something that Finding the words: the remarkable journey of a bestselling writer struck with a rare and devastating affliction and how he triumphed over his condition.

Over the next several weeks in hospital and in rehabilitation, Engel discovered that much more was affected than his ability to read. His memory failed him, and even the names of old friends escaped his tongue. At first geography eluded him: he would know that two streets met somewhere in the city, but he couldn’t imagine where. Apples and grapefruit now looked the same. When he returned home, he had trouble remembering where things went and would routinely ?nd cans of tuna in the dishwasher and jars of pencils in the freezer. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The China Diary of George H. W. Bush: The Making of a Global President.

Howard Engel brings to his memoir, The Man Who Forgot How to Read, all the skills he has learned as a crime writer working on the Benny Cooperman books. It is witty, insightful, moving without being sentimental, and it keeps you turning the pages. Back at home, while still putting garbage in the dishwasher or laundry in the fridge, a book begins to take shape. Benny, his detective, hospitalized with brain damage after a blow to the head, solves the mystery of how it happened without leaving his hospital ward. Engle describes the strangeness of composing a chapter and being unable to read it; of starting down a plot path and forgetting its destination, of the tricks he uses to anchor himself to the text. Spare, thoughtful and upbeat, Engel illuminates the "insult" to the brain and the business of learning to live with it.

Engel’s remarkable triumph over his affliction-he was finally able to write again and produced another bestselling Benny Cooperman detective novel, Memory Book-will inspire his fans and fascinate anyone interested in the mysteries of the human brain. ru - One morning, prolific and bestselling crime novelist Howard Engel awoke to discover he had lost the ability to read. ru/books/about/Man Who Forgot How To Read.

Howard Engel CM (born April 2, 1931) is a Canadian mystery writer and CBC producer who resides in Toronto, Ontario. He is well known to Canadian readers for his series of Benny Cooperman detective novels, set in the Niagara Region in and around the city of Grantham, Ontario (which strongly resembles the real city of St. Catharines, Ontario, where Engel was born)  . The book is largely based on personal experience. He later published The Man Who Forgot How To Read (2007), a memoir of the time he spent recovering from the stroke, with an afterword by Oliver Sacks (who wrote about Engel's reading problems in the book The Mind's Eye), and another novel, East of Suez, in 2008.

Engel discovered one morning in 2001 that his daily newspaper, the Toronto Globe and Mail, appeared to have been written in Cyrillic or Korean. Recovering from his stroke at Mount Sinai Hospital, he was diagnosed with alexia sine agraphia, which meant that though he could still write, he could not read what he had written. This was a severe blow: Engel was, he writes, a one-trick pony, and reading was my trick. The memoir focuses, however, on his post-stroke life.

The Man Who Forgot How To Read. nisbn: 031238209Xn

This coming weekend, a documentary film inspired by Dr. Sacks’s latest book, The Mind’s Eye, will be broadcast on BBC World News. Here is Stereo Sue (aka Susan R. Barry) enjoying a 3-D movie: The film also features novelist Howard Engel and famed chef Danny Delcambre, along with Dr. Sacks. Broadcast times on BBC World News (a separate channel from BBC America) are Saturday, May 19 at 02:10 GMT and 15:10 GMT; Sunday, May 20 at 09:10 GMT and 21:10 GMT-that’s Greenwich Mean Time, not to be confused with British Summer Time

One morning, prolific and bestselling crime novelist Howard Engel awoke to discover he had lost the ability to read. He had experienced a stroke that left him with the rare condition known as alexia sine agraphia—he could write, but as soon as he committed his thoughts to the page, he no longer knew what they were. Other effects of the stroke emerged over time, but none were as dramatic and devastating as this one for a man who made his living working with words.     The Man Who Forgot How to Read is the warm, insightful and fascinating story of Engel’s fight to overcome a condition that threatened to end his career. Engel’s remarkable triumph over his affliction—he was finally able to write again and produced another bestselling Benny Cooperman detective novel, Memory Book—will inspire his fans and fascinate anyone interested in the mysteries of the human brain.

Reviews: 7
Ce
I have been reading a lot of books by or about people who have brain injuries lately. This stems from my having had a large brain hemorrhage about 1.5 years ago. I'm always interested in other people's stories.

Mr. Engle and I have much in common, like Engle, I was once a writer, though not as successful. Unlike Engle, I do not have alexia. We both had injuries in the visual cortex, his on the left and mine on the right. We both have difficulty reading, although for different reasons. We both have deficits stemming from the adjacent parietal lobe. Oh, and we both lost our sense of direction, which is more annoying and debilitating than you might imagine.

Anyway, Engle's book demonstrates some of the very problems he discusses, namely repetition of words, phrases, and events. It is also disorganized, lacking linearity in any dimension. I would think that a lot of this stems from not being able to read back what he has written. Hearing someone else read it is not the same, especially for repeating words and phrases. You'd think his editor would have caught the repeated content though.

While his story is interesting, I think it is more interesting for people like me than for the general public.

I have two recommendations for Engle that I wish I could convey to him. Blind people use a program called JAWS that does an excellent job of reading text off a computer screen. It is expensive but it allows many people to work who would not otherwise be employable. My second recommendation is that he should try reading off a Kindle Paperwhite. This device is the only thing that allows me to read. I suppose it is because of the side lighting, the ability to control line length by varying font size (large fonts are actually more difficult for me), and the text is very crisp against a white background. Without the kindle, I would be essentially illiterate myself.

Anyway, I think I am going to read his novel, Memory Book, next. I am curious to see how his deficits affect his writing under that venue.
Manris
It's a true story, not based on one. That's what intrigued me first.
The author has lost his key skill--the one eBay is his livelihood and his self-identity.
And then he describes, add best he can, the journey.
Intriguing reading!
Dukinos
Ugh. What a tedious book.
I received the book today, and finished reading it in just a few hours. I skipped over many pages. The book is too short for a proper book, really, and I think it would have been better had Mr Engel written a long-ish article instead of a very short book.
I did not find it fascinating or inspirational or wonderful, to me it was just..dull, and a bit repetitious.
When I finished the book, it immediately went into the pile of books I have saved up to take a local used book store.
Vut
Howard Engel woke up one morning, opened his daily paper and discovered he could no longer read. "The letters, I could tell, were the familiar twenty-six I had grown up with. Only now, when I brought them into focus, they looked like Cyrillic one moment and Korean the next."

He had had a stroke. As the morning proceeded he forgot names - including his own. Familiar landmarks appeared in unfamiliar places. He was unable to say what relation he was to his son.

While all this would be devastating to anyone, the alexia - his inability to decipher written words - was a special blow. Engel was not only a voracious reader, he was a writer, the award-winning Canadian author of the popular Benny Cooperman detective series. He had lost his means for making a living.

Or maybe not. Engel had alexia sine agraphia. Which meant he could still write - he just couldn't read what he had written. "The sine agraphia was the sop designed to make me feel good. It was like being told that the right leg had to be amputated but that I could keep the shoe and sock."

But the possibility continued to percolate as he went through weeks of rehab and readjustment. Engel relates this time of confusion and effort with humor, clarity and insight, exploring the mysteries of the brain and its elastic abilities to compensate and fill in gaps.

Back at home, while still putting garbage in the dishwasher or laundry in the fridge, a book begins to take shape. Benny, his detective, hospitalized with brain damage after a blow to the head, solves the mystery of how it happened without leaving his hospital ward.

Engle describes the strangeness of composing a chapter and being unable to read it; of starting down a plot path and forgetting its destination, of the tricks he uses to anchor himself to the text.

Spare, thoughtful and upbeat, Engel illuminates the "insult" to the brain and the business of learning to live with it. He had help - a wide network of family and friends and a relationship with neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks, who provided an afterword for Engel's post-stroke Cooperman book and supplies another for this memoir. But it was his own calm acceptance and determination that got him through each day and will arouse empathy and admiration in the reader.