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ISBN:0814794637
Author: Ronald Weitzer
ISBN13: 978-0814794630
Title: Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business
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ePUB size: 1402 kb
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Language: English
Category: Psychology
Publisher: NYU Press (December 1, 2011)
Pages: 288

Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business by Ronald Weitzer



In his book Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business Ronald Weitzer takes a comprehensive look at prostitution in a variety of contexts specifically examining the legal structures which make it legal or illegal. Weitzer also works to highlight some of the key paradigms through which prostitution is addressed as well as to explain the mechanics of the profession overall. The book is not about agreeing or disagreeing with the activity of prostitution per se - it's about ferreting out facts without sensationalization, polemics or hyperbole to support an argument - in this case one for a specific type of legalization of indoor prostitution.

Published by: NYU Press. Legalizing Prostitutionmaps out the current terrain. These cases are then used to develop a roster of "best practices" that can serve as a model for other nations considering legalization. Legalizing a theoretically grounded comparative analysis of political dynamics, policy outcomes, and red-light landscapes in nations where prostitution has been legalized and regulated by the.

The central question Weitzer poses is ‘whether government policy makes any difference in the way prostitution is organized and experienced’ (p. 73) by the various stakeholders.

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Home Browse Books Book details, Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice t. .Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business. Yet in some nations, prostitution has been decriminalized and is regulated by the government. People who live outside these countries know very little about legal prostitution-what is permitted, how it is regulated, and what the effects of legalization are on those involved. Americans might also be surprised to learn that, until recently, Rhode Island had no prostitution law on the books.

From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business. Her work set off the campaign of the leading social democrat alderman Asscher and his fellow party member Cohen, the mayor of Amsterdam, to clean up the Red Light district under the guise of fighting forced prostitution but also to gentrify the area and attract more upscale tourists (Asscher 2010; Weitzer 2012: 159–166)

Legalizing Prostitution maps out the current terrain. These cases are then used to develop a roster of best practices that can serve as a model for other nations considering legalization.

Publishers Weekly "Ronald Weitzer, the leading American authority on prostitution, offers readers a comprehensive, astute, and provocative report on prostitution. Legalizing Prostitution challenges simple-minded ideas about a behaviour that takes numerous forms, from streetwalking to high-end escort services.

Legalizing Prostitution provides a theoretically grounded comparative analysis of political dynamics, policy outcomes, and red-light landscapes in nations where prostitution has been legalized and regulated by the government, presenting a rich and novel portrait of the multifaceted world of legal sex for sale.

fi - While sex work has long been controversial, it has become even more contested over the past decade as laws, policies, and enforcement practices have become more repressive in many nations, partly as a result of the ascendancy of interest groups committed to the total abolition of the sex industry.

While sex work has long been controversial, it has become even more contested over the past decade as laws, policies, and enforcement practices have become more repressive in many nations, partly as a result of the ascendancy of interest groups committed to the total abolition of the sex industry. At the same time, however, several other nations have recently decriminalized prostitution.
Reviews: 5
Jairani
Thorough and well documented. Interesting, useful descriptions of different legalized prostitution models. Author could have made clearer distinction between decriminalized and legal prostitution. Difficult for me to understand how something that is not legal can nonetheless be regulated.
Bundis
very good
Kata
Debates on the legality of prostitution have most likely existed since the onset of the profession. The concept of prostitution itself is simultaneously disdained and regarded with a seductive, edgy mystique. In fact out of all the vices within modern society, prostitution seems to have found the widest audience, spanning even the most definitive cultural boundaries. In his book Legalizing Prostitution: From Illicit Vice to Lawful Business Ronald Weitzer takes a comprehensive look at prostitution in a variety of contexts specifically examining the legal structures which make it legal or illegal. Weitzer also works to highlight some of the key paradigms through which prostitution is addressed as well as to explain the mechanics of the profession overall.

Before really explaining my thoughts on the book, I suppose it's best to address why you should read the book at all. As a practicing planner, I found it really interesting because it got at the roots of how we conceptualize the use of space in urban areas. I'm not sure you could come up with a more controversial use if you tried. Weitzer uses a variety of real locations to show how prostitution is currently regulated and the ups and downs to those regulations. He also explores how regulation can create black markets and other deleterious and unregulated scenarios. Oddly, I found the discussion to provide a great deal of insight as to how land uses which are traditionally considered to be incompatible might be located in close proximity to one another. Even if you aren't directly interested in the academic study of prostitution, the land use theories presented provide particularly interesting reading.
offers an authoritative and scholarly glance into the subject of prostitution

Weitzer presents his findings in three major sections: "Sex Work", "Policies: America and Beyond", "Case Studies: Three Red-Light Cities". The "Sex Work" section frames what is included under the umbrella of prostitution as well as explaining the major distinctions between "outdoor" and "indoor" prostitution. It also looks at popular paradigms through which prostitution is condemned or praised as a profession. "Policies: America and Beyond" examines what policies are in place currently and how they are enforced. This section also looks at a number of common myths and realities associated with prostitution (including its association with human trafficking and the manner in which police conduct prostitution stings). "Case Studies: Three Red-Light Cities" provides a detailed ethnography of prostitution in Antwerp, Frankfurt, and Amsterdam.

Legalizing Prostitution is an academic offering from New York University press. Weighing in at 284 pages, it offers an authoritative and scholarly glance into the subject of prostitution. Weitzer manages to address the politics of prostitution without delving deep enough into the morality of the issue to confuse the subject. Simply put, Weitzer addresses the legal frameworks of prostitution and offers potential scenarios where higher degrees of freedom and equity can be achieved. The book provides insights into other issues which have typically involved the same amount of controversy such as gaming, adult businesses, and drug use establishments. I recommend it to anyone interested in the topic of sex work as well as those interested in land use planning concepts. From my other reading on the subject, I found it to be an interesting compliment to Patty Kelly's Lydia's Open Door: Inside Mexico's Most Modern Brothel.
Thabel
Ronald Weitzer, professor of sociology at George Washington University, has written a highly readable, very well researched book on a controversial topic that will fascinate and interest members of academia and the general public alike. The book is not about agreeing or disagreeing with the activity of prostitution per se - it's about ferreting out facts without sensationalization, polemics or hyperbole to support an argument - in this case one for a specific type of legalization of indoor prostitution. I very much enjoyed every chapter, from the inquiry into legislative aspects of both American and European law, to descriptions of the sometimes embarrassing and unbelievable efforts of various American vice squads to "root out" this particular "evil." The references are many and they are vast in their scope. Dr Weitzer is an excellent writer who has mapped out not only heterosexual and homosexual prostitution as an outside observer - he has also provided an alternative perspective communicated by sex workers. A must-have.
Negal
Very well-informed examination of LEGAL prostitution in a bunch of different cities and countries. Weitzer is more conservative than sex workers who advocate decriminalization or deregulation, but way more tolerant than the nuts who think sex trade can be made to not exist. His opposition to street trade: problematic if you have family or friends who haved worked the streets. But I am reading this as a guide to what actually exists, not as a polemic. Lots of us don't know how these regulations actually work in Nevada and Holland. These are the strongest features of this book. Important contribution to the discussion