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ISBN:026273124X
Author: Frank C. Keil,Robert A. Wilson PhD
ISBN13: 978-0262731249
Title: The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) (A Bradford Book)
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ePUB size: 1570 kb
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Language: English
Category: Medicine
Publisher: A Bradford Book (August 2, 1999)

The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) (A Bradford Book) by Frank C. Keil,Robert A. Wilson PhD



Robert A. Wilson, Frank C. Keil. Since the 1970s the cognitive sciences have offered multidisciplinary ways of understanding the mind and cognition. The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) is a landmark, comprehensive reference work that represents the methodological and theoretical diversity of this changing field. At the core of the encyclopedia are 471 concise entries, from Acquisition and Adaptationism to Wundt and X-bar Theory.

The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. A Bradford Book The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. 1999 Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher.

Robert A. Wilson, Frank Keil. It is fantastically organized, easy to read and understand, and provides detailed yet concise information on basically EVERY Cognitive topic. Perfect for the remotely curious reader too! Download (djvu, 1. 3 Mb) Donate Read. MITECS) brings together 471 brief articles. on a very wide range of topics within cognitive science. The general quality of the contributors and their contributions is outstanding

The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. Robert A. Wilson and Frank C. Keil (ed. (University of Illinois and Yale University). The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MITECS) brings together 471 brief. articles on a very wide range of topics within Cognitive Science. MITECS opens with excellent overview articles by each of the advisory. The general quality of the contributors and their contributions is outstanding.

Since the 1970s the cognitive sciences have offered multidisciplinary ways of understanding the mind and cognition. The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) is a landmark. Now at last The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences has provided a forum large enough for that interaction to occur–a forum that will not only facilitate cooperation but will educate a new generation of cognitive scientists. George Miller Professor of Psychology Emeritus,Princeton University).

Frank C. Keil is Professor of Psychology at Yale University.

Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. Liaisons: Philosophy Meets the Cognitive and Social Sciences (Bradford Books).

A landmark, comprehensive reference work that represents the methodological and theoretical diversity of this changing field.

This is a fully-searchable, complete text ofThe MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) on a dual-platform CD-ROM.

Since the 1970s the cognitive sciences have offered multidisciplinary ways of understanding the mind and cognition. The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) is a landmark, comprehensive reference work that represents the methodological and theoretical diversity of this changing field.

At the core of the encyclopedia are 471 concise entries, from Acquisition and Adaptationism to Wundt and X-bar Theory. Each article, written by a leading researcher in the field, provides an accessible introduction to an important concept in the cognitive sciences, as well as references or further readings. Six extended essays, which collectively serve as a roadmap to the articles, provide overviews of each of six major areas of cognitive science: Philosophy; Psychology; Neurosciences; Computational Intelligence; Linguistics and Language; and Culture, Cognition, and Evolution. For both students and researchers, MITECS will be an indispensable guide to the current state of the cognitive sciences.

System requirements: Compatible with Windows 95, Windows NT (16MB of RAM available to Acrobat Reader; 10MB hard-disk space); Windows 3.1 and 3.11 for Workgroups (12MB hard-disk space); Macintosh and Power Macintosh (8MB of RAM available to Acrobat Reader, Apple System Software version 7.1.2 or later, and 12.5MB hard-disk space).

Reviews: 6
Rrinel
still very instructive although old now
Nalmergas
ok
Arcanefire
In 1999, when this was published, there was not much high-quality online material of this type. Now there is lots, including Wikipedia. I purchased this to read the overview papers, which I found elementary and pedagogical---not useful for research. I read a sampling of entries and found them fragmented and rather elementary. Thus, this book (like many other 'encyclopedia' type books, are superannuated. I will donate my copy to charity.
Vispel
The best of its kind. When I am reading something else and I run across a ter, technique or subject I am unfamiliar with; this is the place to go.
Zargelynd
This is an excellent add to any library dealing with the Cognitive Sciences or especially anyone new to that area of study. It is fantastically organized, easy to read and understand, and provides detailed yet concise information on basically EVERY Cognitive topic. Perfect for the remotely curious reader too!
Jusari
The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences - "MITECS" - is a truly excellent book. MITECS is the book I spent four years wishing for back when I started studying cognitive science. MITECS is also a very *large* book; I've set out to read all 471 articles, and I'm currently on "Computational Neuroscience" (p. 166 of 900), although I've also read a lot of other articles as circumstances required. From that sample size, my comments:
The good news: There are some truly excellent articles in this book. Microcolumns and macrocolumns, cerebellar chips, the pathways of the visual system - you can read this book and find out a hundred amazingly cool things that you never even realized you desperately needed to know. Oddly enough, MITECS is also a pretty good as an encyclopedia - if you suddenly need to know more about vision, you'll find what you need to know in "Visual Anatomy and Physiology". (Or "Visual Processing Streams". Or "High-Level Vision". Or "Computational Vision". Or "Mental Rotation". You do need to do a certain amount of hunting, if it's a sufficiently broad subject. More than half the cerebral cortex is devoted to vision - see "Mid-Level Vision" - and MITECS reflects this fact.)
MITECS *excels* as an authoritative reference; you'll almost never need to quote anything else. If you're familiar with cognitive science, you'll often laugh when you get to the end of an article and see the author's byline: "Columns and Modules" by William Calvin, "Chinese Room Argument" by John Searle, "Evolutionary Computation" by Melanie Mitchell, "Evolutionary Psychology" by Leda Cosmides and John Tooby.
The bad news: If you try to read MITECS linearly, you will find that many of the articles, perhaps even a majority, are eminently skippable. (For the record, I read them anyway.) As all of the articles were written by independent individuals - none of whom could read the book first, since it didn't exist yet - there is understandably a great deal of duplication of information. Every third author feels the need to inform you that the mind is a computational information-processing system. (If I had one request to make of the hundreds of authors who write the next edition, it would be: "Skip all the introductory material and the philosophy and try to pack in as much useful detail as you can.") There are also some understandable problems with depth of coverage, made worse by the aforesaid tendency to write introductions; whenever I read an article about a topic that I had earlier studied in more detail, it really brought home the realization that each of these 471 articles tries to cover a topic about which *multiple* entire books have been written.
There are several things I'd like to see in future editions of this book. First and foremost is *less philosophy* and more focus on concrete details, particularly *surprising* details, or details that have something substantial to say about how the mind works. I don't want to know what David Hume thought about causality; I want to know if anything interesting happens when research subjects are asked to reason about causality. (I must also confess myself uninterested in most of the biographical articles that form much of MITECS - but then, that's probably because I'm not using it to study history.) Finally, I would like to see a neuroanatomical index as well as a table of contents. It's already a big book, but they can afford another six pages to show a detailed neuroanatomical map, with names for the areas, and references to the appropriate sections of the book. Such a map would be an enormous help to those of us trying to build up a concrete visualization of the brain.
Conclusion: This is a *really good* book. It's not so much "a good book with a few drawbacks" as "an excellent book with tremendous potential for *even more* improvement", and I mean this in all seriousness. If you're a cognitive scientist, you have basically no choice but to buy this book. If you're a student of the mind or a cognitive hobbyist, then this may not be the *first* book you buy, but you will buy it sooner or later.
It's just such a great book.