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ISBN:0156010755
Author: Antonio Damasio
ISBN13: 978-0156010757
Title: The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness
Format: lit docx lrf mbr
ePUB size: 1571 kb
FB2 size: 1380 kb
DJVU size: 1952 kb
Language: English
Category: Medicine
Publisher: Mariner Books; First edition (October 10, 2000)
Pages: 386

The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness by Antonio Damasio



The publication of this book is an event in the making. All over the world scientists, psychologists, and philosophers are waiting to read Antonio Damasio's new theory of the nature of consciousness and the construction of the self.

Developed in his (1999) book, 'The Feeling of What Happens', Antonio Damasio's three layered theory of consciousness is based on a hierarchy of stages, with each stage building upon the last. The most basic representation of the organism is referred to as the Protoself, next is Core Consciousness, and finally, Extended Consciousness.

The publication of this book is an event in the making. All over the world scientists, psychologists. Descartes’ Error was an international bestseller. I found the book fascinating, not particularly difficult reading, and a useful resource to me as a college teacher and faculty developer. I've recommended it to many professors.

Emotion and feeling Core consciousness The hint half hinted A biology for knowing. The organism and the object The making of core consciousness Extended consciousness The neurology of consciousness Bound to know. Feeling feelings Using consciousness Under the light Appendix. Notes on mind and brain. Summary, et. Focuses on the body's reaction to its world, postulating that a complex relationship between body, emotion, and mind is required to configure the self. Rubrics: Consciousness Physiological aspects Emotions Mind and body physiology.

Consciousness is the feeling of what happens-our mind noticing the body's reaction to the world and responding to that experience. Without our bodies there can be no consciousness, which is at heart a mechanism for survival that engages body, emotion, and mind in the glorious spiral of human life. A hymn to the possibilities of human existence, a magnificent work of ingenious science, a gorgeously written book, The Feeling of What Happens is already being hailed as a classic.

KEYWORDS: emotions, consciousness, self, neuropathology. The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness. New York: Harcourt Brace. In his new book, The Feeling of What Happens, Damasio tackles the problem of consciousness already outlined towards the end of his previous work, and he characteristically sets his discussion against the background of a neurobiological theory of emotions and feelings rooted in the body. Specifically, two problems of consciousness are identified. The first is to explain how neural patterns engender mental "images", where an image is not just a visual percept but any mental pattern built with the tokens of each sensory modality.

Damasio's perspective is, fortunately, becoming increasingly common in the scientific community; despite all the protestations of old-guard behaviorists, subjective consciousness is a plain fact to most of us and the demand for new methods of inquiry is finally being met. These new methods are not without rigor, though. Damasio and his colleagues examine patients with disruptions and interruptions in consciousness and take deep insights from these tragic lives while offering greater comfort and meaning to the sufferers.

Damasio and his colleagues examine patients with disruptions and interruptions in consciousness and take deep insights from these tragic lives while offering greater comfort and meaning to the sufferers. His examples from the weird world of neurology are unsettling yet deeply humanizing-real people with serious problems spring to life in the pages, but they are never reduced to their deficits. 2012-11-02 Surviving the Extremes: What Happens to the Body and Mind at the Limits of Human Endurance by Kenneth Kamler (PDF) - Removed. 2011-12-09The Mechanics of the Derivatives Markets: What They Are and How They Function.

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The publication of this book is an event in the making. All over the world scientists, psychologists, and philosophers are waiting to read Antonio Damasio's new theory of the nature of consciousness and the construction of the self. A renowned and revered scientist and clinician, Damasio has spent decades following amnesiacs down hospital corridors, waiting for comatose patients to awaken, and devising ingenious research using PET scans to piece together the great puzzle of consciousness. In his bestselling Descartes' Error, Damasio revealed the critical importance of emotion in the making of reason. Building on this foundation, he now shows how consciousness is created. Consciousness is the feeling of what happens-our mind noticing the body's reaction to the world and responding to that experience. Without our bodies there can be no consciousness, which is at heart a mechanism for survival that engages body, emotion, and mind in the glorious spiral of human life. A hymn to the possibilities of human existence, a magnificent work of ingenious science, a gorgeously written book, The Feeling of What Happens is already being hailed as a classic.
Reviews: 7
Mitynarit
This is a fabulous book about the way that the brain interacts with the body, and with signals from the external world, to produce consciousness. That being said, there are long stretches of theorizing that could have been usefully broken up by more research -- laboratory or clinical; Pinker's How the Mind Words strikes a better combination. More seriously, I'm not convinced that Damasio achieves his objective: to explain consciousness. The closer he gets to that holy grail, the more he lapses into metaphors and appeals to poetry, a sure sign of trouble. Furthermore, to the extent that he sticks to the cognitive science lingo of mapping and images, I kept thinking that what he considers to be the essence of consciousness -- second-order images of the interaction of images of the world with images from the body -- could be replicated on a computer, without this producing consciousness in the sense that humans and (other) animals have it. While the book left me with a much-improved understanding of the biological supports of consciousness, an analysis of preconditions does not an explanation make.
Benn
I liked this book very much and found it to be quite thought provoking. While it can be criticized on various grounds including being difficult to follow, having redundancies and containing a lot of speculation, it still provides good theoretical concepts that are plausible and worth considering.

I also like that Damasio is focusing significant attention on the role of the emotions in thinking and consciousness in general. Although it might turn out that things aren't quite what he says, he has set a new benchmark for explorations in this area and made difficult concepts accessible to large numbers of people. This can only help our understanding of emotions and consciousness as more talented people become involved in studying these areas.

I also like Damasio's other books, which are much more readable, but somewhat less fascinating. If you want to wade into reading some of Demasio's more accessible work, then "Looking for Spinoza" might be a better place to start.

I don't fault Demasio for including non-scientific speculations or using empirical case studies to back up some of his thinking. Clearly, he is doing some philosophizing and in an area such as consciousness, I don't know how one could avoid this. I value scientific rigor, but I also don't dismiss creative thinking. After all, it is usually at the level of intuition that most great discoveries get their start.

I do have a bias that consciousness is more than an epiphenomenon. Therefore, I accept validity criteria outside of the scientific method that might be appropriate to studying subjective phenomenon. Interestingly, it is difficult to study love via the scientific method, yet people are willing to give up their lives for love. While I can't look at love under a microscope, I am convinced it exists. I think the study of consciousness brings up similar kinds of epistemological difficulties, so I can forgive Demasio for pushing the limits of the current scientific paradigm and its underlying assumptions. I find him provocative, but in a good way.

I believe it is the fact that words are fuzzier than mathematics that allows someone like Shakespeare to express beautiful thoughts poetically. While mathematics might be more precise, it can't always capture every dimension of human experience. In a similar way, I don't think initial inquiries into the nature of consciousness can avoid speculation or a lack of precision at times. I give the guy credit for taking the whole question on in the first place. At least he is asking the important questions and taking a "swing at the ball" in terms of explaining them in a way that engages others in meaningful dialogue and further research.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
"There would have been good reason to expect that, as the new century started the expanding brain sciences would make emotion part of their agenda.... But that...never came to pass. ...Twentieth Century science...moved emotion back into the brain, but relegated it to the lower neural strata associated with ancestors whom no one worshipped. In the end, not only was emotion not rational, even studying it was probably not rational." Damasio, 1999, p. 39

With that statement, Damasio courageously took his own discipline's psychologists and neuroscientists to the woodshed for ignoring the importance of the affective domain, and that quotation perhaps explains the love-hate relationship that different reviewers express about this particular book.

His observation is verifiable. One source is the history of citations on "emotion regulation" in the Handbook of Emotion Regulation by James J. Gross, editor. Another is the consignment of Benjamin Bloom's research team's second volume Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Book 2/Affective Domain to a collector's item in used book heaps. In all honesty, that 1964 volume was decades ahead of its time, well before Damasio's, and it is still a useful resource if you can get a copy. It is unfortunate how quickly its importance was dismissed, but Damasio's statement largely shows why Bloom's older volume 1 on the cognitive domain Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook 1: Cognitive Domain received a much warmer reception. John Dunlosky and Janet Metcalfe Metacognition noted that history reveals psychologists according metacognition with similar low status and held metacognition hostage for a time as an aspect of consciousness not worth the study.

Damasio's work seems instrumental in accounting for the exponential upswing in research on affect. I found the book fascinating, not particularly difficult reading, and a useful resource to me as a college teacher and faculty developer. I've recommended it to many professors.