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ISBN:1403979790
Author: Richard Granger,Gary Lynch
ISBN13: 978-1403979797
Title: Big Brain: The Origins and Future of Human Intelligence (MacSci)
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ePUB size: 1743 kb
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Language: English
Category: Medicine
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First edition (January 6, 2009)
Pages: 272

Big Brain: The Origins and Future of Human Intelligence (MacSci) by Richard Granger,Gary Lynch



Prominent neuroscientists Gary Lynch and Richard Granger compare the contents of the Boskop brain and our own brains today, and arrive at startling conclusions about our intelligence and creativity.

Weaving together history, science, and the latest theories of artificial intelligence, Lynch and Granger demystify the complexities of our brains, and show us how our memory, cognition, and intelligence actually function, as well as what mechanisms in the brain can potentially be enhanced, improving on the current design.

The Lynch and Granger combination is like mixing gas with fire. In this book there are big, explosive ideas by two ingenious brain scientists. Michael Gazzaniga, author of The Ethical Brain. Gary Lynch is a brilliant, outspoken neuroscientist. I enjoyed the biography about his work on memory called 101 theory drive. This book talked too much about the Boskops which was a distraction. The best part was the theoretical framework for understanding how the human brain evolved from prototype reptilian-dinosaur and primitive mammalian systems. He builds it up step by step.

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Personal Name: Lynch, Gary. Publication, Distribution, et. New York On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Big brain : the origins and future of human intelligence, Gary Lynch and Richard Granger.

Prominent neuroscientists Gary Lynch and Richard Granger compare the contents of the Boskop brain and our own brains today, and arrive at startling conclusions about our intelligence and creativity.

But barely 10,000 years ago (a mere blip in evolutionary time) human-like creatures called "Boskops" flourished in South Africa. They possessed extraordinary features: forebrains roughly 50% larger than ours, and estimated IQs to match-far surpassing our own. Many of these huge fossil skulls have been discovered over the last century, but most of us have never heard of this scientific marvel. Get this torrent PLAY/STREAM TORRENT ANONYMOUS DOWNLOAD.

Big Brain" by Gary Lynch and Richard Granger is controversial. Supposedly they had brains significantly bigger than current humans. In this book, the authors try to explain current knowledge on human intelligence evolution. They start explaining how our brains are wired, how those connections are translated into stimuli processing and then what makes us different from other mammals and our ancestors. Les auteurs, Gary Lynch et Richard Granger, sont respectivement professeurs de psychiatrie et d’informatique, psychologie et sciences du cerveau. Il n’est donc pas surprenant que leur analyse du fonctionnement du cerveau soit exhaustive.

Big Brain : The Future of Human Intelligence.

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In this groundbreaking look at the evolution of our brains, eminent neuroscientists Gary Lynch and Richard Granger uncover the mysteries of the outsize intelligence of our ancestors, who had bigger brains than humans living today. Weaving together history, science, and the latest theories of artificial intelligence, Lynch and Granger demystify the complexities of our brains, and show us how our memory, cognition, and intelligence actually function, as well as what mechanisms in the brain can potentially be enhanced, improving on the current design. Author of The Emotional Brain, Joseph LeDoux praised it as "provocative and fascinating," and, writing in the New Scientist, Willian Calvin called it "a popular account of how brains enlarge, in both evolutionary and developmental terms" and "a much needed book."

Reviews: 7
Not-the-Same
Gary Lynch is a brilliant, outspoken neuroscientist. I enjoyed the biography about his work on memory called 101 theory drive.

This book talked too much about the Boskops which was a distraction.

The best part was the theoretical framework for understanding how the human brain evolved from prototype reptilian-dinosaur and primitive mammalian systems.He builds it up step by step.

I also liked his discussion of paleocortex versus neocortex. Human neurons have more interconnections than those of other primates.

Physical body health is all about keeping the arteries open. Brain health is all about making and maintaining neuronal connections.

The mention of the Lionel Standing paper on 10,000 pictures and visual memory was also very interesting.
Felolak
A fun romp through the fields of brain anatomy, biology, and evolution. The authors cover most of the key areas while touting their own hypotheses that the entire mammalian neocortex developed from the olfactory cortex and that in brain evolution, random mutations leading to increased brain size occur first followed by the elaboration of functions for the new territories.

Particularly interesting is the use of a computational model to suggest how corticothalamic oscillations refine cognition from category to specific example.

The writing style is occasionally incoherent, and the figures are sometimes less than illuminating, but by and large the concepts are presented in an understandable way to the layman.

Unfortunately the authors have succumbed to the temptation to increase the book's sales by adding some pop-science speculation on the future of human intelligence, and by presenting as fact the rather far-fetched notion that a separate hominid species with super-sized brains(the Boskops) lived among us as recently as 10,000 years ago and then became mysteriously extinct. Entertaining, but definitely at odds with the more serious and well-grounded topics that make up the bulk of the book.

All in all, a good read for anyone without a background in the field who would like to learn something about recent developments in the science of the brain.
Laitchai
This book is accessible to the lay reader, and is strong on brain architecture, neurocircuitry, and comparative brain anatomy across vertibrates. The most interesting set of facts is a graph on p. 143 showing that the relative size of three major brain regions, the diancephalon, the midbrain, and the neocortex, follow power laws with respect to total brain weight, with the neocortex having a quite steep positive slope. This means that humans, who are hugely outliers in the ratio of brain weight to total body weight, are right on the power law curve with respect to the relative size of the neocortex.

This is a very interesting fact, but the authors use it to make questionable arguments concerning the adaptive significance of the large human brain. They show that there is a constant ratio of newborn size to adult relative brain size, and conclude that whatever led humans to have large, relatively infantile newborns is the cause of humanity's uniquely powerful intelligence. They then say that by walking upright, the human female was capable of producing a much larger newborn. Since walking upright has little to do with intelligence, they conclude that human intelligence is a byproduct of bipedalism.

The problem with this argument is that bipedalism may have lowered the cost of producing large, big-brained newborns, but the cost was still very high, in the form of maternal mortality. Hence there must have been some fitness benefit to the large human brain.

The writing and the reasoning in this book are not tight, and some of the arguments questionable. But it is lively, instructive, and has lots of nice drawings. There are many interesting asides that keep the reader's attention. Their discussion of race, an elaboration on Lewontin's argument, has been superseded in the literature, but the exposition is very creative.
Gavigamand
In Big Brain, two neuroscientists offer up an intriguing argument about the size of brains and how that size corresponds to evolutionary advancements. They also shed light on the politics that sometimes informs how scientists present or obscure information.

I found this book interesting, but beyond their argument about bigger brains, I didn't find anything startlingly new. Most of what they presented is information about how the brain is believed to work and how it allows us to think and learn. They did focus on some intriguing mutations that are found in the occasional person where said person has gifts some of us don't have while also having disabilities that we don't have.

The book is an interesting read and does provide some solid information for people who are just learning about neuroscience. It's perspective on evolution is also intriguing, but there are other works that provide more insight into how the brain works than this book will.