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Download Belle in the Big Apple: A Novel with Recipes epub book
ISBN:0743296974
Author: Brooke Parkhurst
ISBN13: 978-0743296977
Title: Belle in the Big Apple: A Novel with Recipes
Format: mbr docx doc azw
ePUB size: 1182 kb
FB2 size: 1929 kb
DJVU size: 1685 kb
Language: English
Category: Womens Fiction
Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (July 7, 2009)
Pages: 240

Belle in the Big Apple: A Novel with Recipes by Brooke Parkhurst



Lists with This Book. From page one it was clear that Belle was a person of privilege, heck in the description it tells you this, so no surprise there, but what I was not expecting was for Belle to be so freaking codependent. If you're moving to New York City but your grandfather is paying your rent - you're not really moving to New York City. I felt this book moved slow and abruptly ended. It took Belle the whole book to find a boyfriend and then they are a perfect match. Aug 15, 2011 Amy rated it did not like it.

6 22. Personal Name: Parkhurst, Brooke. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Belle in the Big Apple : a novel with recipes, By Brooke Parkhurst.

0 0 5 Author: Brooke Parkhurst. When Belle Lee, a vivacious, tart-tongued daughter of Mobile, Alabama, decides that the only way she'll ever make a name for herself as a journalist is to leave the family paper and head to New York,she soon realizes just how daunting life in the big city can be. An outsider desperate to carve a place for herself in the cutthroat world of New York journalism, Belle marches all over town in her kitten heels and her single Chloé suit to hand-deliver résumés and smiles, and to beg for a job from the indifferent or downright hostile office drones.

A Novel with Recipes. Brooke Parkhurst: is an author, foodie, new mom and home cook. Brooke currently pens an online food column, Full Plate, (think Carrie Cleaver) for the New York Daily News. She has also hosted ABC’s internet and digital cable food series in addition to acting as the lifestyle/cooking correspondent for Conde Nast’s debut web network.

This autobiographical book tells the story of the beautiful Southern belle from Alabama, Brooke Parkhurst who made her way to the bright lights and big city to pursue her journalism and cooking career. The road wasn't quite an easy start for this talented and aspiring woman in her 20s. Read along as Brooke experiences the ups and downs of New York City life and brings her Southern charm and recipes along with her too. The story was particularly heartwarming and entertaining, the writing is outstandingly clever, and the recipes are finger lickin' good

A Novel with Recipes. With thirty recipes for everything from Pound Cake to Single-Girl Sustenance and how to make the perfect Manhattan - all told in the delightful and plucky voice of a determined and saucy young woman - Belle in the Big Apple is about finding love in the most unlikely places, following your dreams and staying true to yourself.

My house work had to wait as I couldn't put Belle in the Big Apple down long enough to accomplish anything. As I read, I kept imagining the book played out on the big screen, wondering who would play each character. Each character has such life-I feel like they're sitting with me on the couch as I turn each page! And the recipes! My mouth is watering as I write out my grocery list. I can't wait to prepare some of the book's wonderful recipes. Ms. Parkhurst is a refreshing, new voice on the scene. I can't wait to read her next book.

But with heroic persistence, a wicked sense of humor, and a taste for the gourmet, Belle finally catches her big break: a job as a produc- tion assistant at a conservative twenty-four-hour news network. This belle had to live in the Big Apple. At age 22, Brooke moved to New York City to chase her journalistic star and, instead, lost her way.

In 2008, Scribner published my debut book, Belle in the Big Apple, a novel with recipes. I’ve also hosted ABC and the James Beard Foundation’s television and online cooking series, Eat & Greet. In addition to my blog, ww. rookeparkhurst. com, I write a couples cooking column for MyScoop. com as well as for the Pensacola News Journal. This autobiographical book tells the story of the beautiful Southern belle from Alabama, Brooke Parkhurst who made her way to the bright lights and big city to pursue her journalism and cooking career. The road wasn’t quite an easy start for this talented and aspiring woman in her 20s. The story was particularly heartwarming and entertaining, the writing is outstandingly clever, and the recipes are finger lickin’ good.

Now in paperback, a lively tale about a sassy, food-loving Southern gal who moves to New York City to become a jour- nalist—“think Scarlett O’Hara, and, dare we say it, maybe just a hint of Rachael Ray.” —Daily News (New York)When vivacious, tart- tongued Belle Lee decides that the only way she’ll ever make a name for herself as a journalist is to head to New York, she quickly realizes just how daunting life in the big city can be. But with heroic persistence, a wicked sense of humor, and a taste for the gourmet, Belle finally catches her big break: a job as a produc- tion assistant at a conservative twenty-four-hour news network.There she suffers the sexually suggestive commentary of one of the station’s better-known male anchors, fetches scripts, and pulls footage in the wee hours of the morning—never losing her Southern charm and positive attitude. But when Belle uncovers the truth behind an illegal network deal, she has no choice but to take matters into her own hands.With thirty recipes for everything from Bribe-Your- Coworkers Pound Cake to how to make the perfect Manhattan—all told in the delightful and plucky voice of a determined and saucy young woman—Belle in the Big Apple is about following your dreams and finding love in the most unlikely places.
Reviews: 7
Ballazan
I only gave this book one star, because the recipes in it were very good and worth having. But the novel itelf was not. An unlikeable main character, sleazy supporting characters, poor writing and many typos (e.g. "Lexus-Nexus" (sic) and "Senator Pelosi" (ick) made this read rotten to the core. Sorry, but the author should stick with food writing.
Quttaro
"Belle in the Big Apple" is a lovely, light confection. The southern girl who storms the big city with guts and style is equal parts Holly Golightly, Lorelei Lee, and Bridget Jones.

Oh--and don't forget Ms. Scarlet!

Read this book in the kitchen --not the easy chair-- and see if you don't try out a baker's dozen of Belle's fabulous recipes.
Vozuru
This is the second book I've read by Brooke Parkhurst. I am seeing a pattern:

1. Even after reading both books, I don't feel like I know the character.

2. The Southern thing comes and goes. As a screenwriter I was always told that one never writes dialect; that is left to the voice over person. I feel it's the same in a book. Tell me where they're from and let me "hear" them speak.

3. Re: 2... she's not consistent.

4. Ms. Parkhurst seems to have a serious case of ADD. She's all over the place. While I enjoy a litte side path as much as the next person, I'd like the writer to return to the initial path. I need some closure here.

I like novels with recipes. I have a copy of Nora Ephron's "Heartburn" with my recipe books for some of her potato recipes, and a lovely pasta. I have the Patricia Cornwall recipe book, which I bought after her description of a white lasagna in one of her Kay Scarpetta novels. Ms. Parkhurst's book isn't going with the cookbook collection.

I would have been disappointed if I had managed to stay on task with this one. But that just wasn't possible.
Vobei
This was a most disappointing read. I am a sucker for southern novels and Belle was a mockery of everything the south is supposed to be. Not to mention the story line was almost non-existent, the character development was skeletal, and trying to follow the plot was practically impossible. I can't comment on the recipes as I have not tried any. They may be wonderful but honestly I have my own favorites for chocolate butter cream frosting, chicken salad and pound cake. If I had not been stuck without anything else to read I wouldn't have bothered finishing this disaster of a novel. All I can wonder is did this poor writer even have an editor? Did no one read this before they decide to publish? Don't waste your time or your eyesight slogging through this muck. It's terrible.
Arith
Belle is tired of people thinking that the only reason she has her own column in the Mobile newspaper is because granddad owns the company - she longs to spread her trust fund wings in the Big Apple. Instead of her own column at the New York Times or anchoring the 6:00 news, she gets a position as a production assistant on a conservative cable news network during a heated presidential election, where she has to claw her way up from the bottom of the ladder. But her interests lie with the other more liberal candidate - can she reconcile her values to keep her job?

Frankly, I couldn't care less. I started and stopped this story so many times. It just never really held my interest. In Parkhurst's quest to write a clever chick lit story, every cliché and metaphor is tossed into this poorly written and predictable debut novel. The most annoying aspect (aside from the selfish and narcissistic lead character) had to be Belle's southern accent - Parkhurst uses so many colloquialisms (and annoying drops the g in all the ING words) that it got old really quick. I really hate when authors do this because they don't think readers have enough of an imagination to provide a voice to their characters when we read their novels. I'm fixin' to toss this one into the trash.
cyrexoff
I was intrigued by the concept of a fish-out-of-water in New York City, laced with humor and recipes. Guess what? It wasn't funny, and the recipes didn't look particularly good, at least to this Yankee (bacon in a salad?). Belle is too enchanted with herself to be very likeable; she keeps mentioning her ego, which is already blatantly apparent, and the one mention of her "ample bottom" is clearly an editor's suggestion to bring her down to earth.

I agree with what the others said - the author seemed to suffer from genre confusion. The concept and cover are pure chick lit, while the writing style is strangely ponderous.

Not recommended. For a fun story set in the food industry, try "Turning Tables" (by Heather and Rose MacDowell) or "Waiting" (by Debra Ginsberg) instead.
Samulkis
What I was hoping for when I opened this book was a magical combination of Sex In the City, The Devil Wears Prada, The Nanny Diaries and Nigella Lawson. what I got was a boring, insipid little story with unappealing recipes. Our heroine is wasting Daddy's money by seeking a career as a writer in the Big Apple. She plods from one unpleasant and completely uncaptivating relationship to another, sometimes having meals that she inadequately describes, sex that sounds ho hum, or other adventures -- most of which we have read about in other books. If this had been the first book in the Girl versus NYC genre, that delightful little literary niche would never have taken off! Want to take a bite out of the Big Apple? There are lots of other choices. Ditto food memoirs. This book leaves you hungry.