Download Real Estate epub book
ISBN:0671544241
Author: Jane Delynn
ISBN13: 978-0671544249
Title: Real Estate
Format: docx mobi doc azw
ePUB size: 1176 kb
FB2 size: 1971 kb
DJVU size: 1149 kb
Language: English
Category: United States
Publisher: Poseidon Pr; First Edition edition (March 1, 1988)
Pages: 316

Real Estate by Jane Delynn



Authors she’s been compared to include Proust, Salinger, Jane Austen, Rabelais, Swift, Oscar Wilde, Proust, Helene Cixious, and Edgar Allan Poe, Aristophanes, Euripedes, & Woody Allen

After 18 years, "Real Estate" by Jane DeLynn reads like something from the Victorian Age, at least in terms of the details. However, I was around and a younger adult at the time, and the book rings very true to the period. Perhaps things like this can only be appreciated from a distance - the way "The Great Gatsby" seems endlessly nostalgic and fascinating today

After 18 years, "Real Estate" by Jane DeLynn reads like something from the Victorian Age, at least in terms of the details. Perhaps things like this can only be appreciated from a distance - the way "The Great Gatsby" seems endlessly nostalgic and fascinating today

Foreign countries, New York, New York (.

Book Views: 33. Author. Take your real estate career to the highest level! "Whether you are just getting started or a veteran in the business, The Millionaire Real Estate Agent is the step-by-step handbook for seeking excellence in your profession and in your life. -Mark Victor Hansen, cocreator, New York Times bestselling series Chicken Soup for the Soul. This book presents a new paradigm for real estate and should be required reading for real estate professionals everywhere.

Leash extends the logic of S&M to its inexorable and startling conclusion, darkly and hilariously revealing the masochistic impulse as the urge to disappear from the chores, obligations, and emotional vacuity of daily life.

In her last novel, "Real Estate," Jane DeLynn turned 1980s avarice and ambition into grand buffo. Now this most acute and dry-eyed chronicler of urban psychic waste offers "Don Juan in the Village," a devastating portrait of sexual conundrum, told in 13 stories about a gay female writer. Pickups are the litmus test of her attractiveness and the antidote to her loneliness.

Jane DeLynn, author of Tasting Life Twice: Literary Lesbian Fiction by New American Writers, on LibraryThing. Jane DeLynn is currently considered a "single author. If one or more works are by a distinct, homonymous authors, go ahead and split the author. Jane DeLynn is composed of 3 names. You can examine and separate out names.

Jane Delynn, American novelist. Recipient Elizabeth Janeway prize for Prose Writing, 1967, 68, New York Foundation for the Arts award, 1988, William Flanagan Memorial Creative Persons Center, Edward Albee Foundation award, 1981,; Yaddo fellow, 1988, 90, MacDowell Foundation fellow, 1980, Book of the Month Club fellow, 1968. Dramatists Guild, Public Triangle, Phi Beta Kappa. Teaching assistant University Iowa, 1969-1970. Substitute assistant professor Lehman College, City University of New York, 1991-1992, adjunct associate professor, 1989-1990.

Jack, an East Village artist, hides from his failures in the expensive but empty upper West Side co-op of his lover Lorraine, whose ex-husband and daughter round out a cast searching for satisfaction in material wealth
Reviews: 2
Tinavio
This compares favorably with Tom Wolfe's "Bonfire of the Vanities", or at least it's an interesting companion piece. I heartily disagree with Library Journal or the other reviewer here; I think this is a fairly well written and interesting look at the upper classes in NYC circa 1988.

One problem it shares with "Bonfire" is that the delights of skewering the rich and pretentious so often require pinpoint accuracy in detailing clothes, apartments, brand names, and the prices of everything. However, time is cruel to such books. After 18 years, "Real Estate" by Jane DeLynn reads like something from the Victorian Age, at least in terms of the details. For example: an apartment on Riverside Drive, with superb views, 2500 square feet....for $200,000???? Try more than ten times that amount today! This affects nearly every aspect of the book.

However, I was around and a younger adult at the time, and the book rings very true to the period. Perhaps things like this can only be appreciated from a distance -- the way "The Great Gatsby" seems endlessly nostalgic and fascinating today. In it's day, it was trendy and of the moment, but I recall my high school English teacher telling our class how her students in the 50s and 60s laughed themselves silly over Gatsby's silly clothes and pink shirts! Well, what goes around...comes around.

I am sure that someday the 80s will become nostalgic and fascinating. The problem is we are still a bit too close to it, and therefore it seems a bit frumpy. That will change, I assure you. Meanwhile, there is a lot of snarky fun in this book, if you can keep that in mind, and well-drawn characters true to the period. As stated, the chapters (there is more than one actually) narrated by Jack the dog are winsome and charming, almost worth a book in of itself.

This must be long out of print -- I had a great deal of trouble finding it at the library and had to order it via interlibrary loan. I originally read it about 15 years ago or so. I did not find it aged or lost it's authenticity in that time, and I plan to find a used copy online somewhere. I will keep it next to my copy of "Bonfire", they do make nice companion pieces of the era. If you find this at a book sale or otherwise, it is will worth a read...and hang on to it, it will be more interesting in the next 50 years.
Unde
Lorraine, a fashion coordinator whose lawyer husband, David, is unfaithful, takes up with Jack. Jack is an incredibly lazy artist. He moves into her NYC apartment but hates it -- he'd rather have the apartment upstairs, which is just like Lorraine's was before an expensive and extensive renovation.
David moves in with his mistress, Cecilia. Cecilia goes back to her husband so David is out of a place to live. He can't go home because Jack is there so he has to look for another apartment.
Everyone wants something better and each thinks he or she has the worst. Jack-the-dog, however, is a dear creature whose story is told through canine eyes. DeLynn should throw out the entire manuscript except for the pages that tell the dog's tale.
This book is foul in language, shallow in perception and not worth your money.