Download Fires epub book
ISBN:0977669327
Author: Nick Antosca
ISBN13: 978-0977669325
Title: Fires
Format: txt mobi docx azw
ePUB size: 1154 kb
FB2 size: 1185 kb
DJVU size: 1830 kb
Language: English
Category: United States
Publisher: Impetus Press; 1st edition (March 15, 2007)
Pages: 194

Fires by Nick Antosca



FIRES is a novel by Nick Antosca about three young people locked in a violent sex triangle. well, sort of. It’s also about a boy trapped in a basement for eight years, but at the same time, it also has deer running through a ghost neighborhood. Oh, and there are no quotation marks, for like, when the characters talk and stuff. But this isn’t a problem You may not fall in love with: Dan, his parents, Ruth, James, George, Jeffrey or even Zach but that’s not the point. Each character is beautifully flawed and Antosca is a master when it comes to allegorical depiction and metaphorical representation. Pay close attention to the dialogue and imagery. Antosca’s very good with his words and every word in this novel counts.

Having just finished Fires, the debut novel by 23-year-old Nick Antosca in two short sittings, I now know that it is possible to be strangled without realizing. A difficult proposal, obviously: how could you ever not notice the hands around your neck? Fires procures this unexpected, plodding feeling via well-trimmed, thoughtful prose, storytelling that lets the words work more in the cortex than directly on the page. I found myself drawn through the first half of Fires without understanding what it was that kept me going. The book’s second primary setting is so well rendered that it stings - Danfield returns to his hometown set ablaze, eaten up by unbridled fires almost Saundersian in their apt handling, though without the drawl of satire. As the title implies, the flames seem to burn up on the page even when not mentioned.

Nick Antosca (born January 23, 1983) is an American novelist, screenwriter and producer. His novels include Fires (2006), Midnight Picnic (2009), and The Girlfriend Game (2013) He also co-created and showran the Hulu true crime anthology series, The Act (2019). Antosca was born in New Orleans, Louisiana and currently lives in Los Angeles, California. He graduated from Yale University in 2005.

Nick Antosca's Midnight Picnic is a thrilling follow-up to his contemplative debut, Fires. His imagination makes an astonishing show in this macabre, bizarre and witty story of ghosts and revenge. Impossible to put down until the extremely satisfying end, Midnight Picnic conjures up the mounting tension of the finest Bradbury story. After thoroughly enjoying Fires, reading Antosca’s second book seemed like a natural thing to do. Midnight Picnic is every bit as expertly executed as Fires, and it similarly straddles the line between highbrow art and a labor of love (in other words, its depth is earned and its story is engaging for virtually any reader, but it's also an example of superb technical craft). This is a story to get your mind going-if you've ever wanted to know what it might feel like to really be haunted for real, take Midnight Picnic with you to the top floor of a Gothic library somewhere.

Fires : a novel Nick Antosca. Library of Congress Control Number: 2010277143. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0977669327 (pb. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 9780977669325. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Fires : a novel, Nick Antosca.

Nick Antosca is the author of the novels Midnight Picnic and Fires. He was born in New Orleans and currently lives in Los Angeles. His blog is Brothercyst. Fires is a striking work reminiscent of James Salter (A Sport and a Pastime) in its combination of a cool unforgiving eye and a hot intensity of feeling and sensual immediacy. John Crowley, author of Little, Big. Fires is fantastic

com Product Description (ISBN 0977669327, Paperback). Deer running through a ghost neighborhood. A boy trapped in a basement for eight years. Three young people locked in a violent sex triangle. Already caught between the ambition and alienation of life at an Ivy League school, Jon Danfield must come face to face with a revelation about his small-town past. Nick Antosca is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing. profile page author page.

Find nearly any book by Nick Antosca. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates. Stephen Graham Jones. Learn More at LibraryThing. Nick Antosca at LibraryThing.

An eerie story about the nature of death and the self, Midnight Picnic inhabits an American landscape made strange and unfamiliar. From the author of the cult novel Fires, Midnight Picnic is a haunting and disturbing experience.

Caught between the ambition and alienation of life at an Ivy League school, Jon Danfield must face a revelation about his past. His journey will take him from the halls of privilege into the heart of the forest fire threatening his childhood home. On deserted streets lined with perfect houses, Danfield must confront an American dream corroded by unspeakable acts of cruelty.
Reviews: 7
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Jon, the protagonist of Fires, sets out alongside fellow Yalie and former high school classmate James Dearborn to investigate his hometown’s most sinister secret, and finds himself in a suburban wasteland. The journey through evacuated Bondurant–sprinklers left running, houses turned into ad-hoc camps for the two explorers, dogs abandoned, a childhood history about to be destroyed, and a fire “magnificent and awful, like a chasm…on the mountainside” looming in the near distance–provide apocalyptic imagery so effective you can almost taste the heat. Fires reminds me simultaneously of the video games Scratches and Majora’s Mask, hinting at the shadows beneath the mundane and making the reader know, feel, that time is running out, the world is eroding away.

The characterizations are compelling, from the dark undercurrent running through the romantic triangle to the homoerotic overtones between Jon and James. It is these elements that lead the reader down the trail to a climax, a final destination that you expect yet can’t predict. That said, the lushness and fullness of the setting and, the words carefully chosen to impart it, are the main reasons I recommend this book. Fires is a pleasant stroll through the unthinkable.
Dark_Sun
It's good. I think I was expecting more, but it's not a terrible novel or anything. If you find it used for cheap, it's certainly worth getting. The story is interesting and the writing is clear. The author has some good imagery. It's just, this story has been told before and there's nothing special about it being told here. It's really a supermarket crime story, and there's nothing inherently wrong with that, just that there are better ones out there.
Mightdragon
when i started reading this, i thought i was in bret easton ellis territory, which isn't ncessarily a bad thing. but "fires" builds and builds, and has hidden layers, and secrets not readily revealed. this is an intense, moving, gripping short novel. it leaves one with a lot to think about when one's done. a lot.
CrazyDemon
FIRES is a novel by Nick Antosca about "three young people locked in a violent sex triangle..." well, sort of. It's also about "a boy trapped in a basement for eight years," but at the same time, it also has "deer running through a ghost neighborhood." Oh, and there are no quotation marks, for like, when the characters talk and stuff. But this isn't a problem. In as few words as possible, I can say that FIRES is actually a pretty difficult book to label and describe without revealing too much of the plot. I can also say that it is fairly easy to read because FIRES features some of the sharpest prose I have ever seen.

A brief summary of FIRES would sound horribly mundane and rather dull, especially when compared to, say, a thriller like CODEX or a Tom Clancy novel (yuck). Part of the charm lies in the fact that many people can/could probably relate to some of the events that take place in the book. It talks about: love, anger, sex, frustration, depression, violence, sickness, drinking/alcoholism and a few other things that make up significant portions of our everyday lives.

The author basically tells a story that sort of unravels in reverse, as the major characters are quickly revealed in just the first few pages. On page 2: "James Dearborn is someone I know from high school. And George Mursey is a big, affable guy from my home town, a neighbor from just across the street. A high school teacher, a football coach. Not a guy you'd expect to-- Wait. I don't want to think about it yet. I want to think about Ruth." And the next section of the book, of course, is titled "Ruth."

The book isn't just one long continuous account of Jon Danfield's life and it's not a stream-of-consciousness crap-fest either. FIRES is separated into several little sections that could best be described as moments. These moments never mark the beginning of a new page, but rather, highlight several moments of Danfield's life. These moments can begin anywhere on the page. And with section markers like "Girl's Bedroom" and "Being Sick" everything is pretty much revealed in the title, no fancy word-play here.

From the very beginning, Antosca forces us (the readers) to ask several questions about the text and its characters (which he eventually answers, thank God). Some reviewers have described FIRES as rather slow and occasionally boring and I'm going to be brutally honest here when I say that without a doubt, there are times when you will be thinking "why the hell is Antosca talking about this and what does it have to do with the story" but at the same time, it's the little unnecessary tidbits of information and seemingly mundane portions of the book that actually interested me the most. The stuff inside Danfield's head.

Things like the sometimes long bouts of introspection (and there are a lot) allowed me to truly discover the character of Danfield, as dialogue is not always representative of a character. FIRES certainly lacks the sort of expository fluff that plagues countless other novels and boasts a writing style that is analogous to several other contemporary minimalists but still manages to offer something new to the genre. Think: Blake Butler, Sam Pink, Tao Lin, Noah Cicero or even Brandon Scott Gorrell and you'll get an idea of the writing style. Repetitious lines like: "Little. A little" and "All right, okay," are just two examples of a cyclic writing-style that embraces the flaws and imperfections of everyday speech. In FIRES, the characters speak like real people, and I applaud Antosca for actually writing authentic/believable dialogue that actually sounds interesting because it is so uninteresting (really!). In FIRES, the characters often mishear things and a lot of the time, respond with one-word answers, like "'kay" or "cool."

Awesome.

Stay with FIRES until the very end if you want to solve the mystery of the book because there is a mystery, sort of... You may not fall in love with: Dan, his parents, Ruth, James, George, Jeffrey or even Zach but that's not the point. Each character is beautifully flawed and Antosca is a master when it comes to allegorical depiction and metaphorical representation. Pay close attention to the dialogue and imagery. Antosca's very good with his words and every word in this novel counts.