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ISBN:1555973841
Author: William Kittredge
ISBN13: 978-1555973841
Title: The Best Short Stories of William Kittredge
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ePUB size: 1113 kb
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Language: English
Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
Publisher: Graywolf Press; First Paperback Edition edition (July 1, 2003)
Pages: 200

The Best Short Stories of William Kittredge by William Kittredge



Start by marking The Best Short Stories of William Kittredge as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Nature has more-but none truer. We were meat hunters. You spent money for shells, you brought home meat. A master storyteller and essayist, William Kittredge is best known for his unflinching vision of the hardscrabble landscape of the West and the people who survive and die in it. His stories are stripped down but bristle with life to offer a dusty, relentless landscape; the smell of freshly turned dirt; the blunt conversations about work that needs doing; and the rare, quiet moment of reflection that amounts to nothing less than poetry.

We Are Not in This Together: Stories (The Graywolf Short Fiction Series). Taking Care: Thoughts on Storytelling and Belief (Credo). The Next Rodeo: New and Selected Essays. com User, April 9, 2004. This is a fine collection of stories set in the West by a man who grew up on a big family ranch in southern Oregon and eventually settled as a writer in western Montana.

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Discover William Kittredge famous and rare quotes.

Kittredge paints with these colors: sky blue, night black, blood red. We hauled a boat down and fished him out that afternoon. -from "The Waterfowl Tree" A master storyteller and essayist, William Kittredge is best known for his unflinching vision of the hardscrabble landscape of the West and the people who survive and die in it. His stories are stripped down but bristle with life to offer a dusty, relentless landscape; the smell of freshly turned dirt; the blunt conversations about work that needs doing; and the rare, quiet moment of reflection that amounts to nothing less than poetry

William Kittredge (born 1932) is an American writer from Oregon, United States, who has then been mostly living in Missoula, Montana. He was born in 1932 in Portland, Oregon, and grew up on a ranch in Southeastern Oregon's Warner Valley in Lake County where he attended school in Adel, Oregon, and later would attend high school in California and Oregon. He earned his undergraduate degree in agriculture from Oregon State University.

Enjoy William Kittredge famous quotes. In learning to pay respectful attention to one another and plants and animals, we relearn the acts of empathy, and thus humility and compassion - ways of proceeding that grow more and more necessary as the world crowds in. - William Kittredge.

He followed with his famous book, Hole in the Sky: A Memoir. com/William Kittredge. Kittredge, William Filmography. How the West Was Lost. 2008, role: actor, character name: Himself.

William Alfred Kittredge, American humanities educator. Named Montana Humanist of Year, 1989; recipient award for literature Governor of Montana, 1988, Charles Frankel prize in Humanities, National Endowment of the Humanities, 1994, Earl A. Chiles Lifetime Acheivement award, 2006, Los Angeles Times Kirsch Lifetime Achievement award, 2007, Lifetime Achievement award Western Literature Association, 2008. With United States Air Force, 1954-1957. src "/web/img/loading. gif" data-src "/web/show-photo. jpg?id 1263470&cache false" alt "Other photo of William Alfred Kittredge" class "gallery img" height "167". Other photo of William Alfred Kittredge.

Download pdf book by William Kittredge - Free eBooks. Find and Download Book - The Best Short Stories of William Kittredge.

"Kittredge paints with these colors: sky blue, night black, blood red. Nature has more―but none truer."―The New York Times Book Review

"We were meat hunters. You spent money for shells, you brought home meat. I saw Teddy Spandau die on that account. Went off into open water chest deep, just trying to get some birds he shot. Cramped up and drowned. We hauled a boat down and fished him out that afternoon."―from "The Waterfowl Tree"

A master storyteller and essayist, William Kittredge is best known for his unflinching vision of the hardscrabble landscape of the West and the people who survive and die in it. His stories are stripped down but bristle with life to offer a dusty, relentless landscape; the smell of freshly turned dirt; the blunt conversations about work that needs doing; and the rare, quiet moment of reflection that amounts to nothing less than poetry. The Best Short Stories of William Kittredge represents the author's finest work, available together in a handsome edition.

Reviews: 4
MilsoN
I bought a copy of this to replace one that I lent out years ago and never got back. Mr. Kittredge is a masterful storyteller, at turns like James Lee Burke and at other times like Norman Maclean and Wallace Stegner. You won't regret buying this man's work.
Gardagar
Well written in a brutal way, but there is only so much I can take of stories about depressed, alcoholic macho men who are hurting everyone around them. If you live like this, you might get more out of these characters than I did, but then you would probably not be reading a book in your spare time. You'd be drinking and driving and arguing with your spouse instead.
Ishnjurus
This is a fine collection of stories set in the West by a man who grew up on a big family ranch in southern Oregon and eventually settled as a writer in western Montana. Kittredge is a promoter of other Western writers' talent, editing anthologies like "The Portable Western Reader" for Penguin and helping to bring to the screen a film version of Norman Maclean's "A River Runs Through It." In this collection of short stories, Kittredge reveals his own particular talents as a Western writer, drawing on his knowledge of rural and small town living in the Great Basin and Montana. His characters are genuine and deeply etched by the western code of individualism, self-sufficiency, and personal freedom. They are also haunted by the dark side of that code - isolation, loneliness, and restlessness.
The men in these stories are strong and independent, both physically and emotionally. But they are not infallible. The women in their lives typically reveal to them things about themselves they'd rather not know. A man who hires a crop-duster to spray his land discovers that the pilot's command of an airplane excites wanderlust in the wife he thought he knew. A 34-year-old man, taking a wife and fathering a child, discovers that she was once the lover of his married brother. A man goes in hunt of a grizzly after the killing of a young woman camper, and in a chilling temptation of fate, puts his life in the hands of another woman to whom he has given his high-powered rifle.
In other stories, a boy's idyllic life collapses into grief when his loving father dies while they are hunting geese in a frozen landscape. A combine operator harvests a field of wheat for a rancher and dies, his intestines perforated by a lifetime of hard work and hard knocks. A penniless cowboy works the ranch of a rich woman he has loved since she was a girl, knowing that "There is nothing to own but what you do." An old man's daughter is shot and killed, and the young man who first romanced her pays a call on her mourning father.
The stories often deal with death or are about the defiance of death, and these themes seem to emerge from the landscape itself - remote, sparsely populated, given to extremes of heat and cold. The characters Kittredge creates are sharply drawn, and their speech is colorful and unschooled. Emotion surges beneath taciturn surfaces. There is tension in their unspoken desires, and for that reason the relationships between men and women are rarely untroubled. I highly recommend this collection of stories for readers interested in the West and the psychological impact of wide-open spaces and unsentimental lives. As a companion book, I'd also recommend Ralph Beer's terrific Montana novel, "The Blind Corral."
Quamar
Kittredge is best known, perhaps, for his essays on the American West, but some of us old timers have been reading (and loving) his short stories for thirty years now. Bill's prose reinforces the rumors that God sat in on his graduate fiction workshops at the University of Montana back in 1978; his characters take your breath away on their varius paths to self-discovery and self-destruction; and, always, there is the cruel force of the West itself, underlying each and every sentence.