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ISBN:0771592922
Author: Grey Owl
ISBN13: 978-0771592928
Title: Men of the Last Frontier, The
Format: doc lit mbr docx
ePUB size: 1300 kb
FB2 size: 1596 kb
DJVU size: 1332 kb
Language: English
Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
Publisher: Macmillan (1989)
Pages: 253

Men of the Last Frontier, The by Grey Owl



Grey owl. Introduction by james polk. Published in 1931, The Men of the Last Frontier was Grey Owl’s first book, the kickoff to an unparalleled international career as a Native celebrity, a bestselling writer, and a popular lecturer on preserving the wilderness. On December 10, 1937, a mere six years after his first book, he reached the top, invited to speak to King George VI, Queen Elizabeth, and the two princesses in a private audience at Buckingham Palace.

Later books by Grey Owl after The Men of the Last Frontier include his entertaining bestseller Pilgrims of the Wild (Dundurn Voyageur Series, 2010), which dramatizes the beavers and includes a valuable biographical introduction by Michael Gnarowski.

Grey Owl's 1931 book 'The Men of the Last Frontier' is an interesting read. It morphs from a rather Victorian description of life in the wilderness (with all the inherent hyperbole you might expect from an author of the era trying to 'sell' his viewpoint) to an autobiographical portrait of a man realizing his true passion for the Wilds.

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. DURING THE LAST TWENTY YEARS OR SO, WITH EMIGRAtion pouring its thousands of newcomers into Canada to seek fresh homes, the world has been wont to consider the Dominion as a settled country, largely shorn of its forests, and given over almost entirely to farming, mining, manufacturing, and like industries. In tune with his surroundings, wise in the lore of the Indian, he reads and correctly interprets the cryptograms in the book that lies open before him, scanning the face of Nature and forestalling her moods to his advantage.

His first book as Grey Owl was called The Men of the Last Frontier, published in 1931, and it traced the devastating story of the beaver as well as posed some very valid concerns about the future of Canada and its forests. Beaver pelts had become such a hot commodity in Canadian industry that the beaver was on the verge of extinction when Anahareo helped him understand the desperate need for protecting the animal instead of trapping it. According to Grey Owl in The Men of the Last Frontier, trappers swarmed to the forests in higher numbers than ever before in 1930 because of.

In 1931 Grey Owl published his first book, The Men of the Last Frontier, a work that is part memoir, part history of the vanishing wilderness in Canada, and part compendium of animal and First Nations tales and lore. A passionate, compelling appeal for the protection and preservation of the natural environment pervades Grey Owls words and makes his literary debut still ring with great relevance in the 21st century. By the 1920s, Canadas outposts of adventure had been thrust farther and farther north to the remote margins of the country.

by Grey Owl, 1888-1938. Publication date 1937. Topics Frontier and pioneer life, Indians of North America. Publisher London : Country Life. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. First published 1931. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by aga on July 20, 2012.

Grey Owl. In 1931 Grey Owl published his first book, The Men of the Last Frontier, a work that is part memoir, part history of the vanishing wilderness in Canada, and part compendium of animal and First Nations tales and lore. A passionate, compelling appeal for the protection and preservation of the natural environment pervades Grey Owl's words and makes his literary debut still ring with great relevance in the 21st century. By the 1920s, Canada's outposts of adventure had been thrust farther and farther north to the remote margins of the country

Reviews: 4
Ironfire
I would recommend this book to any who are interested in American/Canadian history involving natives and settlers. It's a picture that Grey Owl is able to relay to the reader as if the reader were there. It was an excellent read.

Steve and Carol James
Paxondano
AWESOME book
Haralem
Great writer for his time, as I expected!
Stanober
Grey Owl lived and worked among many people who survived by canoeing, transporting goods, trapping, hunting, fishing, and often living at great distance from other human beings - with whom they might have enjoyed talking and comparing stories. He decided to put some of this lifestyle down on paper, in the form of a book. In this work he describes the lifestyle, and its hardships, but mainly the joys that became such a motivation for his own choices in life. It isn't an academic monograph, but it IS several other things: a collection of stories shared around a campfire, a description of a lifestyle that is very Canadian and is now almost gone, and a window on lives that could be happy, even in solitude.