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ISBN:0395937590
Author: Maeve Brennan
ISBN13: 978-0395937594
Title: The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin
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ePUB size: 1543 kb
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Language: English
Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
Publisher: Mariner Books; Export ed edition (November 2, 1998)
Pages: 368

The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin by Maeve Brennan



The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin (1998) contains stories published between 1953 and 1973 in The New Yorker, together with one earlier story from Harper’s Bazaar. She and her family – husband Hubert, son John – are the focus of the six stories in the book which Maxwell describes as clearly finest. It’s hard to doubt that. They provide a life in episodes as convincing and moving as Connell’s Mrs Bridge, laying the character out from her childhood until after her death. However, I approached these stories cautiously: An Attack of Hunger, which I had liked so much as a standalone piece, is one of the Derdon stories.

The magnificent title story is wide-ranging, savage, poignant, and should bring back to the table of modern fiction, where her place has b These masterly stories trace the patterns of love in three middle-class Dublin families, patterns as intricate and various as Irish lace. I am very much a latecomer to the Irish short-story writer and journalist, Maeve Brennan, only having read The Springs of Affection, a brilliant collection of her Dublin stories from the early 1950s to the early ‘70s.

The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin (1998) contains stories published between 1953 and 1973 in The New Yorker, together with one earlier story from Harper’s Bazaar. The first stories in the book – which were among the earliest Brennan published – are short and seemingly autobiographical of her childhood. The third group of stories is about Delia and Martin Bagot. She, so dedicated to her family that she allowed them all to leave her, had never forgiven her brother for marrying, and does not seek to disguise her feelings on their lives.

Ireland is once more the source of great, and disturbing, fiction. Most of us will not have heard of Maeve Brennan before opening this volume, yet the quality of her stories is cause for wonder. The first several are autobiographical sketches of her childhood in 1920s Dublin.

From the first page to the last, Maeve Brennan takes you on a vivid trip to Ireland in the 1920s and 1930s. She explores the feelings of children and adults in this wonderfully written book of short stories. Brennan's book is an exceptional series of short stories, the poignancy of her stories is breathtaking. She was a master at her craft and her mastery shines through every page.

The Springs of Affection Stories of Dublin. By MAEVE BRENNAN Houghton Mifflin Company. The Old Man of the Sea. One Thursday afternoon, an ancient man selling apples knocked at the door of our house in Dublin. He appeared to me to be about ninety. His hair was thin and white. His back was stooped, his expression was vague and humble, and he held his hat in one of his hands. His other hand rested on the handle of an enormous basket of apples that stood beside him. My mother, who had opened the door at his knock, stood staring at him. I peered out past her. I was nine.

Most Talked About Books. Maeve Brennan and her work had already been lost to public view when she died in 1993. Never eager to establish a home, moving from one rented room to another, staying in friends’ places while they were away, she disappeared by degrees, at last joining the ranks of the homeless. Now The Springs of Affection brings it back, as a favor to us all, and it is as true and as haunting as before. One of the literary puzzles indeed: Perhaps her colleagues and friends at The New Yorker tried and failed to intervene on her stories’ behalf when Brennan was unable to do so herself? To help see her existing volumes into paperback? Or press for the Dublin stories to be compiled and arranged, as did Christopher Carduff?

These stories tend to be more satiric in tone, and she often parodies middle-class pretensions. In 2004, Angela Bourke's biography Maeve Brennan: Homesick at the New Yorker was published. Christmas Eve (1974). The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin (1997). The Rose Garden: Short Stories (2000).

with her family as a teenager. She worked at both Harper’s Bazaar and the New Yorker from the 1950s until to the 1970s. Many of her short stories were published at these titles and she became best known to the American public under the pseudonym of ‘The Long-Winded Lady’ via her ‘Talk of the Town’ column at the New Yorker. Brennan left behind a legacy of short fiction at her death in 1993: "The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin," "The Rose Garden: Short Stories" and the novella "The Visitor. Largely unknown in Ireland until the millennium, Brennan has gradually become more recognized as more and more people become interested in her work and life.

The Springs of Affection: Stories by Maeve Brennan Stinging Fly, 368 pp, £. 9, May 2016, ISBN 978 1 906539 54 2. Maeve Brennan could stop traffic. According to her colleague Roger Angell, she laid waste to a ‘dozen-odd’ writers and artists after the New Yorker hired her as a staff writer in 1949. She makes a cameo as the magazine’s ‘resident Circe’ in a biography of the cartoonist Charles Addams; legend tells that she was Truman Capote’s inspiration for Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

These masterly stories trace the patterns of love in three middle-class Dublin families, patterns as intricate and various as Irish lace. "Maeve Brennan's book is full of small miracles," wrote the New York Times Book Review. "The magnificent title story is wide-ranging, savage, poignant, and should bring [Brennan] back to the table of modern fiction, where her place has been empty too long."
Reviews: 7
Ballalune
You must read Maeve Brennan - this collection of stories is completely involving. Brennan so thoroughly takes you into the minds and feelings of her characters that you find intimations of relationships in your own life - whereby - somehow - you and someone you love or care for keep missing (meaning not getting) one another. You are not (likely) in Dublin, nor necessarily Catholic, but you are in close proximity to a significant other and you may feel, but not know, that the workings of your inner self and of the others' inner self prevent all possibility of mutual understanding. The hopelessness of that situation is laid bare again and again as Maeve tells her stories. They are sometimes utterly devastating - beautifully rendered nonetheless...
Tygokasa
I thoroughly enjoyed the introduction by William Maxwell who wrote about Brennan - what a complex person she seems to have been, what smarts and wit she had! I also found some descriptions she wrote to be magical and thought provoking. However, so much of these characters' lives were sad and the relationships of the couples were not full ones and were lacking in communication, that I did not enjoy the stories as much as I had hoped I would.
RuTGamer
Even the stories that are rather sad and unhappy are so well written that they speak profoundly. One of the stories that I particularly liked was "The Barrel of Rumors." Curious about the life of the Poor Clare nuns her mother helps with donations of food, Maeve can never bring herself to ask them about what she wants to know. And, of course, no one she does ask can really answer her questions. Her Uncle Matt, though, can throw in just a very light touch of humor about what she wants to know. Charming.
just one girl
From the first page to the last, Maeve Brennan takes you on a vivid trip to Ireland in the 1920s and 1930s. She explores the feelings of children and adults in this wonderfully written book of short stories. Must be kept as a favorite for all time.
Landaron
Brennan's book is an exceptional series of short stories, the poignancy of her stories is breathtaking. She was a master at her craft and her mastery shines through every page.
Dammy
A warm and engaging writer whose prose style is deceptively simple and whose powers of observation are close to unparalleled,
Jugore
This stories are magic. They simply tell us, in their simplicity, that fiction, that life are the people.
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