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ISBN:0571228364
Author: Richard Hamer
ISBN13: 978-0571228362
Title: A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse
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Language: English
Category: Poetry
Publisher: Faber & Faber (2006)
Pages: 208

A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse by Richard Hamer



A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse contains the Old English texts of all the major short poems, such as The Battle of Maldon', The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer and The Seafarer, as well as a generous representation of the many important fragments, riddles and gnomic vers The essential canon of Old English poetry, with parallel verse translation, in this now classic.

Book's title: A choice of Anglo-Saxon verse; Library of Congress Control Number: 74477005 //r88. National Bibliography Number: B70-06778. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0571087647. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book A choice of Anglo-Saxon verse; selected, with an introduction and a parallel verse translation by Richard Hamer.

A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse contains the Old English texts of all the major short poems, such as 'The Battle of Maldon', 'The Dream of the Rood', 'The Wanderer' and 'The Seafarer', as well as a generous representation of the many important fragments, riddles and gnomic verses that survive from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, with facing-page verse translations. These poems are the well-spring of the English poetic tradition, and this anthology provides a unique window into the mind and culture of the Anglo-Saxons

A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse contains the Old English texts of all the major short poems, such as 'The Battle of Maldon', 'The Dream of the Rood', 'The Wanderer' and 'The Seafarer', as well as a generous representation of the many important fragments, riddles and gnomic verses that survive from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, with facing-page verse translations. These poems are the well-spring of the English poetic tradition, and this anthology provides a unique window into the mind and culture of the Anglo-Saxons.

Richard Hamer is Tutor in English Literature at Christ Church, Oxford.

A choice of Anglo-Saxon verse (1970). My favourite thing about this book is that the Old English text is given on the left hand page with a parallel translation on the right. To me, Hamer's renditions into Modern English blank verse do retain something of the spirit of Old English poetry - I think to a great extent because he often uses alliteration within the line.

This is particularly true for The Ruin, which Hamer has described as one of his favourites. Never straying far from the original meaning, Hamer imitates the alliteration of Old English poetry only when it does not detract from a translation’s accuracy and clarity. It would have been nice if Hamer had expanded the introductions to each poem, particularly in light of new scholarship.

Richard Frederick Sanger Hamer. Book of Longing by Leonard Cohen (Paperback, 2007).

Learn more about A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse. A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse. 1970 (First Published).

This book is by Richard Hamer contains the old texts of all major short poems and generous representation of important fragments like riddles and gnomic verses. This book provides a unique view into the mind and culture of Anglo Saxon. Prev Article Next Article. More from this Author.

This new edition contains the Old English texts of all the major short poems, such as "The Battle of Maldon", "The Dream of the Rood", "The Wanderer" and "The Seafarer", as well as a generous representation of the many important fragments, riddles and gnomic verses that survive from the 7th to the 12th centuries, with facing-page verse translations. These poems are the wellspring of the English poetic tradition, and this anthology provides a unique window into the mind and culture of the Anglo-Saxons.
Reviews: 3
Samuhn
I read the first edition of this book back in the 1970s. This new edition improves this fine survey of Anglo-Saxon verse with new selections. Hamer's translations have continued to provide clear guides to the Old English which appears on facing pages--and his translations remind us of the richness of this literature and of the need for a modern translation to reimagine the work in our own language. He makes clear and sensible choices. "The Battle of Maldon", "The Dream of the Rood", "The Seafarer"--many of the shorter masterpieces of Anglo-Saxon are here showing a mix of heroic stoicism with Christian piety.
Arakus
This slim paperback provides a gripping and powerful and wonderfully translated sampler of Anglo-Saxon literature. It provides the reader's imagination with a vivid intuitive understanding of the mindset of the Anglo-Saxons before and following their conversion to Christianity. This is the poetry that was written in "Old English" or "Anglo-Saxon" [ though both terms are inaccurate and misleading; indeed, scholars will pick holes even in the very concept of the Anglo-Saxons..... but let's just enjoy their poetry!! ]

While there is a Christian gloss on most of these very powerful and very moving poems, they still inhabit, in good measure, the vanished pagan (non-Christian) world of the great hero, tough and strong and stern and resolute, driven only by honour and nobility, and not all self-regarding, who stoically endures incredible and prolonged hardships; that mighty and war-hardened man who wins everlasting fame and renown through his great deeds of prowess.
In these poems, while there is a sense of the transitoriness of life, and the vanity of fame and earthly achievement, as is dutifully required by Christian Theology, and there is expression of deep regret for the loss of the noble lord and his splendid retinue of noble retainers, all of them now buried deep in the Earth and dead forever, there is still a lot of the "old religion" and the old pre-Christian world of the War Band to be found in these poems; the great and noble lord & king who is loved as a father by his men, giving generous gifts to them, as they feast and drink in his hall, hearing tales of noble deeds, and ever planning new raids on surrounding kingdoms.

Here we find some of the imaginative wellsprings that inspired Professor Tolkien to use his extraordinary imagination to create his own brilliant powerful and poetic myth for the English people (the Lord of The Rings, and the history of Middle Earth).

Suffice it to say that if you are interested in England before the Norman conquest and after the departure of the Roman legions, you will find great enjoyment in reading this book.

Richard Hamer's translations from the Anglo-Saxon are powerful and poetic, and far more enjoyable to read than some of the stilted academic translations of this material, as can be illustrated by the following passage he has translated from "The Wanderer" : :

" Where is the horse now, where the hero gone?
Where is the bounteous lord, and where the benches
For feasting? Where are all the joys of hall?
Alas for the bright cup, the armoured warrior,
The glory of the prince. That time is over,
Passed into night as it had never been. "
PanshyR
Old English poetry is hard to translate for a variey of reasons. OE poetic style is very compact, very nominal and very dense.Accurate translations often seem wordy; "poetic" ones tend to miss a lot. This is the only book currently available ( as far as I know) which provides a selection of OE poems in a bilingual format. I have used this book in teaching; the translations are pretty good and the OE is right there for the curious. A good and very handy book.