Download The Sugar Mile epub book
ISBN:0618562435
Author: Glyn Maxwell
ISBN13: 978-0618562435
Title: The Sugar Mile
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ePUB size: 1473 kb
FB2 size: 1884 kb
DJVU size: 1634 kb
Language: English
Category: Poetry
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (April 7, 2005)
Pages: 144

The Sugar Mile by Glyn Maxwell



In The Sugar Mile, Maxwell returns to the extended verse narrative he so brilliantly employed in Time's Fool, to juxtapose two cities on the brink of irrevocable change. Glyn Maxwell is a British poet who lives in the States. The Sugar Mile is his eight collection. It takes place over the weekend of 8th and 9th September 2011 and Saturday 7th September 1940. The sugar mile refers to the Tate and Lyle factory in London which was bombed during the blitz.

The Sugar Mile is a story of a man in a Manhattan bar following 9/11 who reminisces about being a child during the London Blitz in WWII. The story is told in a series of individual poems by individual characters. Each character's story is told in a different style and meter. I bought this book based on an interview I heard with the author. Full disclosure: I took a workshop with Glyn Maxwell and found him to be a thoroughly pleasant and extremely interesting, surprising person. So I was predisposed to enjoy this book, and I did. This book is challenging. The greatest part of the book is in the sections set during the Blitz. The takeaway for me was what it's like to be immersed in the devastation of attack; there are marvelous descriptions of behaviors of many different types of people. The book is free of the author's telling what is happening; his characters show.

Glyn Maxwell is the author of a new collection of poems, Pluto (Picador).

In his poem, 'Musée des Beaux Arts', Auden wrote of how we do not always recognise or even notice the tragedies of others, and that perhaps this is a necessary indifference. A passing ship must have seen Icarus fall, but 'had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on'. Glyn Maxwell's new long poem, The Sugar Mile, also probes this question of how cataclysmic events are painted onto the canvas of a life. The poem concerns three characters in a New York bar on Broadway and 86th, between 8 and 9 September 2001

In The Sugar Mile, Maxwell returns to the extended verse narrative he so brilliantly employed in Time's Fool, to juxtapose two cities on the brink of irrevocable change. The Sugar Mile begins when the poet steps into an uptown Manhattan bar a few days before September 11, 2001. He is confronted by Joseph Stone, a barstool regular and a fellow expatriate. What a mess the young man's made.

The Sugar Mile: Poetry Glyn Maxwell Mariner Books Paperback 146 pages November 2006. Glyn Maxwell’s The Sugar Mile is a unique exploration in poetry. Without spoiling the continuing story in the book, the crux of what is going to happen in New York and its effects on the city, the nation, and even the world, is explicitly conveyed in the poem Raul Fixing A Cosmopolitan. The final stanza in this poem foreshadows the blistering drama about to take place in NYC.

Enter the English poet Glyn Maxwell, who in his eighth book, "The Sugar Mile," tells a story that moves between two countries and two wars, employs a complicated narrative structure and involves a cast of a dozen or so people. None of this will be a surprise to anyone who has followed Maxwell's work; it is consistently focused on characters and events outside the self, and is very accomplished in terms of craft.

Glyn Maxwell's last book of poems, The Nerve, was declared "one of the most enjoyable books of the year" by the New York Times Book Review. In The Sugar Mile, Maxwell returns to the extended verse narrative he so brilliantly employed in Time's Fool, to juxtapose two cities on the brink of irrevocable change. The Sugar Mile begins when the poet steps into an uptown Manhattan bar a few days before September 11, 2001. He is confronted by Joseph Stone, a barstool regular and a fellow expatriate. "What a mess the young man's made . . . with his poetry pen . . . Warm the beer, Raul, there's an English gent/on duty." It has been almost exactly sixty-one years since London's "Black Saturday," the start of the worst of the Blitz during World War II. Joe is a survivor of the bombing, and his insistent story brings his lost neighbors back to share the terror and the peculiar beauty blooming in the chaos of their last days. Raul, the bartender, interrupts to brag about New York's wonders -- as we begin to understand that the city soon will face its own catastrophic moment in history. As Stone's memories grow more hallucinatory and the bar in New York ends another day, the chance encounter of two strangers takes on the inevitability of fate.
Reviews: 4
Thomand
Glyn Maxwell—everything I've read from him to date, makes me feel things I don't expect to feel based simply on the words on the page. He manages to convey humanity and pathos, longing, nostalgia, regret, without it all being right in your face. It's layered. On the surface there's humor, there's everyday life drudgery and nonsense, and the human story, the human reality, is between the lines, behind the words of the people speaking.
Brakree
It's a poem. It's a play. It's a novel. It's all three! The Sugar Mile is a story of a man in a Manhattan bar following 9/11 who reminisces about being a child during the London Blitz in WWII. The story is told in a series of individual poems by individual characters. Each character's story is told in a different style and meter.

I bought this book based on an interview I heard with the author. Having the background insight that the interview provided made for a more enjoyable read than if I'd just picked it up cold.

One of the most original modern poetic works I've read in a while.
Funny duck
Full disclosure: I took a workshop with Glyn Maxwell and found him to be a thoroughly pleasant and extremely interesting, surprising person. So I was predisposed to enjoy this book, and I did.

This book is surprising and challenging. I've read it twice so far and will probably read it again. The beginning in the New York Irish bar (bartender named Raul) is subtly hilarious. Guess who "Clint" and "Glenn" is, and what he's doing. There's delicious lack of precision in the words of Raul and the habitue' Joey who, it turns out, is also English, as is Clint/Glenn, and the survivor of the Blitz. Read this book slowly, and work it out as best you can.

The greatest part of the book is in the sections set during the Blitz. The takeaway for me was what it's like to be immersed in the devastation of attack; there are marvelous descriptions of behaviors of many different types of people. The book is free of the author's telling what is happening; his characters show. Without saying so, Maxwell points out that the Blitz of 1941 wasn't the last.

This book is not to be missed.
Beardana
Full disclosure: I took a workshop with Glyn Maxwell and found him to be a thoroughly pleasant and extremely interesting, surprising person. So I was predisposed to enjoy this book, and I did.

This book is challenging. I've read it twice so far and will probably read it again. The beginning in the New York Irish bar (bartender named Raul) is subtly hilarious. Guess who "Clint" and "Glenn" is, and what he's doing. There's delicious lack of precision in the words of Raul and the habitue' Joey who, it turns out, is also English, as is Clint/Glenn, and the survivor of the Blitz. Read this book slowly, and work it out as best you can.

The greatest part of the book is in the sections set during the Blitz. The takeaway for me was what it's like to be immersed in the devastation of attack; there are marvelous descriptions of behaviors of many different types of people. The book is free of the author's telling what is happening; his characters show. Without saying so, Maxwell points out that the Blitz of 1941 wasn't the last.

This book is not to be missed.