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Download Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th Century England epub book
ISBN:0520051726
Author: Louis Crompton
ISBN13: 978-0520051720
Title: Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th Century England
Format: docx lit doc mobi
ePUB size: 1160 kb
FB2 size: 1556 kb
DJVU size: 1351 kb
Language: English
Category: Poetry
Publisher: Univ of California Pr (February 1, 1985)
Pages: 432

Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th Century England by Louis Crompton



Byron and Greek Love book. A highly praised and very readable exploration of Lord Byron and his. Start by marking Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th Century England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Personal Name: Crompton, Louis, 1925-2009. Download book Byron and Greek love : homophobia in 19th-century England, Louis Crompton.

In 1985 it was still improprietous to recognize the homophilic tradition - as if homosexuals would claim more biographical pedestals and historical niches than they were entitled to.

The central subject of this book is declared in its subtitle rather than in its title. Homophobia (fear and hatred of homosexuals) played a particular role in English life.

Peter L. Thorslev Jr. First Page. Southey’s Chatterton and the 19th Century. Humphry Davy in 1816: Letters and the Lamp. Byron and Shelley’s Poetry of 1816. Movement in Hymn to Intellectual Beauty. Shelley’s Alastor and On a Future State.

Louis William Crompton, Canadian English literature educator. Recipient Christian Gauss award in literature criticism Phi Beta Kappa, 1969, named Bonnie and Vern L. Bullough award Foundation Science Study Sexuality, 2004. Homosexuality and Civilization. How have major civilizations of the last two millennia treated people who were attracted to their own sex?

LibraryThing members' description.

es - A highly praised and very readable exploration of Lord Byron and his time.

Louis Crompton (born April 5, 1925, Port Colborne, Ontario; died July 11, 2009, El Cerrito, California), son of Master Mariner Clarence and Mabel Crompton, was a Canadian-born scholar, professor, author, and pioneer in the instruction of queer studies. Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th-century England, University of California Press, 1985. Homosexuality and Civilization, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003.

Addresses the role and significance of homosexuality in Byron's life and work and examines the prevalent anti-homosexualism in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England as revealed in period sources
Reviews: 3
Vivaral
Meets all expectations.
tamada
Byron was well-born, rich, gorgeous, arrogant and full of himself. He was talented and his works were published at a young age. He `'came out'' in boarding school, where the competition for the best-looking boys was (and is today) hot and heavy and deadly serious. He could buy young servants and sexually amuse himself with them, as he could, and often did, choirboys (which doesn't infer that any of the boys in question suffered, as Byron was rich, gorgeous, etc.). He traveled around a lot. In Greece he wrote to a friend telling him about his 200 `'coïts'' with the local boys, so many that `'I'm getting tired of them.'' These `'coïts'' were `'full and complete'', presumably meaning penetration (and not intercrural penetration). There were lots of gals too that he liked young and virgin and had no problem procuring as he was well-born, rich, gorgeous, etc. He also had his sister (she told him about her boys and he told her about his girls and one thing led to another....). Nothing in Louis Crompton's book Byron and Greek Love will give you a hard-on, but it's as complete as a book on Byron's homosexuality can be. At the end of his life Byron regretted his youth, not because of the choirboys he'd initiated but because he'd become somewhat bald, somewhat fat and his teeth were decaying. My own books can be found on Amazon under Michael Hone.
Gravelblade
Louis Crompton's *Byron and Greek Love* sullied the reputations of many reviewers attempting
to dismiss it as impugning the reputation of a major poet. In 1985 it was still improprietous to
recognize the homophilic tradition - as if homosexuals would claim more biographical
pedestals and historical niches than they were entitled to. Crompton's *Byron* was held to be improprietous in the extreme.
Curiously, few objected to calling Adolf Hitler (...) even though he was blatantly heterosexual
and overtly homophobic - except, perhaps, those who objected to the use of "the perfectly nice
word (...)" for `sodomite', the same who never objected to losing "perfectly nice words" like
`faggot', `pansy', and `sissy'. There was always a value-added tax on homophilic words while
homophobic words spewed forth like vomit at a frat party. As Gertrude Stein suggested: by any other name,
the same.
If anyone doubted Crompton's overview of 4800 years of gay history, much of which he himself learned in the (...) oral tradition, his stupendous new *Homosexuality and Civilization* must allay all doubts about his *Byron and Greek Love*; it remains the definitive contextual setting of the complex homophilic man Byron and his work.
Today the public is getting used to the (...) reality that civilization is unnatural and that unnatural people have contributed to that reality out of all proportion to their expectable numbers.
As homosexuals came out, their oral tradition had to yield to the written. In that revelation, Crompton is a major expositor. He is amongst the (...)historians who decided, back in
the 1950s, that, while homosexuals had to lie to survive, they would not lie about their own history and the heritage that they sought to pass on.