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Download Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation epub book
ISBN:0963027336
Author: Clyde Bolton
ISBN13: 978-0963027337
Title: Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation
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ePUB size: 1942 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Highland Pr; First Edition edition (November 1, 1999)
Pages: 272

Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation by Clyde Bolton



That's how I often feltwhile reading "Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation". I either wanted to cry, shake my head in disgust or turned red-faced over what some Anglo-Saxons did to the Cherokee Nation  . In his defense, Bolton got the grammar and diction of the Georgia rednecks right.

Even the most learned historian will glean a startling insight into the advanced level of sophistication in the Cherokee Nation and the despicable plunder by the state of Georgia. Nancy Swimmer gives breath to the best story ever written about "The Trail Where They Cried".

Dee Brown described what happened to the plains Native Americans in "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" but Clyde Bolton, through the fictional story of Nancy Swimmer, tells us the little known story of what happened to the Cherokees in North Georgia in the early nineteenth century-a precursor of events that would happen to the Sioux, the Cheyenne, the Shoshone, the Ne. Who said that ethnic cleansing was new?How this ethnic cleansing occurs is the most disgusting part of the book. Old Hickory, also known as President Andrew Jackson and Chicken Snake (at least by Nancy's father), contrives with the state of Georgia to expel the Cherokees, ignore the . Supreme Court under Marshall, and steal the Cherokee's land.

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The Cherokee Nation's dramatic transformation was the result of Smith's principle-based leadership approach and his unique "e;Point A to Point B model"e;-the simple but profound idea that the more you focus on the final goal, the more you will accomplish. and the more you will learn along the way. In other words, "e;look at the end rather than getting caught up in tanglefoot. e; In Leadership Lesso. Principal Chief Smith's book on leadership is sound and provides steps for every business and organization to improve.

Nancy ward, a renowned Cherokee woman, was honored by her people and by the white settlers of East Tennessee. Fighter, Ghigau (beloved woman of the Cherokee), peacemaker, wife, and mother. High priestess of the Cherokee and always loyal friend of white settlers, is buried on the ridge to the west. She repeatedly prevented massacres of white settlers and several times rescued captives from death at the hands of her people. I was always intrigued by Nancy Ward's story, the "Beloved Woman of the Cherokee.

Migration from the original Cherokee Nation began in the early 1800’s. Some Cherokees, wary of white encroachment, moved west on their own and settled in other areas of the country. A group known as the Old Settlers previously had voluntarily moved in 1817 to lands given them in Arkansas where they established a government and a peaceful way of life. Later, however, they were forced to migrate to Indian Territory. White resentment of the Cherokee had been building and reached a pinnacle following the discovery of gold in northern Georgia

Book by Bolton, Clyde
Reviews: 2
Arith
Excellent condition.
Gigafish
Sometimes you just want to cry. Sometimes you are just plaindisgusted. Sometimes you're just ashamed.
That's how I often feltwhile reading "Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation". I either wanted to cry, shake my head in disgust or turned red-faced over what some Anglo-Saxons did to the Cherokee Nation. Dee Brown described what happened to the plains Native Americans in "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" but Clyde Bolton, through the fictional story of Nancy Swimmer, tells us the little known story of what happened to the Cherokees in North Georgia in the early nineteenth century-a precursor of events that would happen to the Sioux, the Cheyenne, the Shoshone, the Nez Percé, the Apache, the Navaho, and other Native Americans later in the nineteenth century.
The humiliation of the Cherokees and the outright thievery of their land also happened to the other southeastern tribes-the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks and Seminoles. However, those humiliations do not make the story of the Cherokees any less poignant or disturbing.
Even though disturbing, I found the book also enlightening, especially if you're like me and do not know much about the southeastern tribes and their tribulations. Americans know, or think they know, a lot about the plains tribes ( the Sioux, Shoshone, etc.), and the eastern tribes (the Iroquois, Delaware and Shawnee, among others) because of movies or books like the Cooper's Leatherstocking tales, Brown's "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" or Costner's movie, "Dancing with Wolves". However, the plight of the southeastern Indians is often overlooked and Bolton does a good job, in a historical novel, of describing their travails without making history fiction.
We get to know Nancy Swimmer as a child, a married teenager, and a young women, which is only a portion of Nancy's life of ninety-eight years but probably the most eventful. During this time, the United States reneges on its treaties -sound familiar--and removes the Cherokees from North Georgia because-guess what, the Georgians want it and there's gold in them thar (sic) Cherokee hills. Who said that ethnic cleansing was new?
How this ethnic cleansing occurs is the most disgusting part of the book. Old Hickory, also known as President Andrew Jackson and Chicken Snake (at least by Nancy's father), contrives with the state of Georgia to expel the Cherokees, ignore the U.S. Supreme Court under Marshall, and steal the Cherokee's land. Old Hickory, I mean Chicken Snake, has gone down considerably in my estimation after reading Nancy's narrative of how he (the snake that he was) double crosses his erstwhile allies-the Cherokees. See, the Cherokees helped Chicken Snake defeat the Creeks at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in Alabama in 1814-just before Chicken Snake (or General Jackson if you prefer) defeated, as Johnny Horton sang, "the bloody British in the town of New Orleans". These shenanigans left me totally disgusted. What happened to the rule of law? Well, as they say, the rules depend on who's making them. I wonder if the War Crimes tribunal could try Old Hickory posthumously for war crimes.
But the story is more than a story of the ethnic cleansing. It's also a story about a young, flawed Cherokee woman. Interestingly, the narrator, Nancy, is not perfect. Matter of fact, she is stubborn, contrary, and self-centered. Many times I was disgusted at Nancy. At times she was hypocritical, adulterous, and intolerant. However, that makes the book more believable. Instead of a story from a heroine narrator, the story comes from a flawed human honest enough to present her own flaws. In other words, the story is more believable because its told through the eyes of someone obviously honest.
I found the story of the Cherokee nation during one of the most traumatic times in its history a good read even though I found it a slow starter. Now that's not to say, I would have not done some things differently. For example, I would have probably moved part of the epilogue to the preface because that move would have informed me that Nancy was the author of nine books. That move would have made me more comfortable with the language she used in writing her story. I had some problems with her style of writing. Specifically, I kept wondering where Nancy learned how to write as well as she did. In the early nineteenth century I'm not sure you would have found that many women, or men, on America's frontier (yes, Georgia was once the frontier), that could write as well as Nancy did. Now, I would have expected such writing from someone who was from nineteenth century New England or who was rich but not from someone living in the hills of North Georgia. I, also, would have made more use of Poppy, Nancy's great, great, granddaughter-possibly as a narrator, although that would have necessitated a change in point of view in various chapters. In addition, the grammar and diction of the Cherokees often seemed unnatural-a little too educated, especially for those without any formal education. In his defense, Bolton got the grammar and diction of the Georgia rednecks right. In addition, Bolton's copy editor missed a incongruity when in one scene a female slave read her master's missive to Nancy-probably not so, in early nineteenth century Georgia anyway.
My last comment does make me wonder about the art of copy editing. I just read Larry McMurtry's Comanche Moon where he referred to Birmingham, Alabama as a city in the 1850s (the town was established in the 1870s). McMurtry also had Texas Rangers using repeating rifles: repeaters were not invented until the Civil War.
My editorial comments about "Nancy Swimmer: A Story of the Cherokee Nation" are all quibbles, however, in relation to the story as a whole. I enjoyed the book although the ending thoroughly disgusted me. Hopefully, you'll be thoroughly disgusted too-not with the book but with America's treatment of the Cherokee.