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Download The Walking Drum epub book
ISBN:0553050524
Author: Louis L'Amour
ISBN13: 978-0553050523
Title: The Walking Drum
Format: rtf doc lrf mobi
ePUB size: 1653 kb
FB2 size: 1246 kb
DJVU size: 1854 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Bantam Dell Pub Group; First Edition edition (May 1, 1984)
Pages: 423

The Walking Drum by Louis L'Amour



The Walking Drum by L'Amour is an incredible book! It is definitely near the top of my list in books. He starts the book out fast and keeps the pace going throughout, never leaving a moment of reading dull! Any lover of historical fiction, adventure, or just looking for a good read would definitely find this book one to keep on their shelf! The story follows Mathurin Kerbouchard, the son of the famous corsair Jean Kerbouchard  . As a kid I read many a Louis L'Amour western. I liked them and I could read them in a matter of few hours. Lots of fun and some history thrown in for good measure.

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Louis L'Amour has been best known for his ability to capture the spirit and drama of the authentic American West. Now he guides his readers to an even more distant frontier - the enthralling lands of the 12th century. At the center of The Walking Drum is Kerbouchard, one of L'Amour's greatest heroes. Warrior, lover, scholar, Kerbouchard is a daring seeker of knowledge and fortune bound on a journey of enormous challenge, danger and revenge. Across the Europe, the Russian steppes and through the Byzantine wonder of Constantinople, gateway to Asia, Kerbouchard is thrust into the.

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The Walking Drum - Louis L’Amour. Written by Louis L’Amour Read by John Curless Format: MP3 Bitrate: 128 Kbps Unabridged. Here is an historic adventure of extraordinary power waiting to sweep you away to exotic lands as one of the most popular writers of our time conquers new storytelling worlds. Louis L’Amour has been best known for his ability to capture the spirit and drama of the authentic American West. Now he guides his readers to an even more distant frontier - the enthralling lands of the 12th century

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About book: The Walking Drum is a historical novel set in 12th century Europe and the Middle East. Mathurin Kerbouchard, the main character, learns that his mother has been murdered in Brittany and that his father is now forced into servitude somewhere east of Baghdad and south of Tehran. tKnowing his mother was murdered by Baron de Tournemine, Mathurin immediately looks for a way to temporarily escape Brittany, so that his life won’t be taken as well. This is my first book by Louis L'Amour and I now have a great respect for his knowledge of the world and his incredible writing that kept me from putting this book down. How much could I tell them?

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L'Amour, Louis - The Walking Drum. Author: L'Amour Louis. DOWNLOAD LIT. Walking Drum.

I had no idea that Louis L’Amour had written a book about the middle ages. I had read some of his westerns a very long time ago and knew he was a prolific and popular author. But when a friend recommended this book to me knowing I like historical novels about this period, I decided to try it.

Warrior, lover, and scholar, Kerbouchard boldly sweeps through the castles, villages, and galleys of twelfth-century Europe, in an adventure that takes him from the shores of Brittany to the steppes of Russia
Reviews: 7
Buriwield
I had no idea that Louis L’Amour had written a book about the middle ages. I had read some of his westerns a very long time ago and knew he was a prolific and popular author. But when a friend recommended this book to me knowing I like historical novels about this period, I decided to try it. Five Stars for sure! What incredible research had to be done to write this story of Europe and the Middle East in the 12th Century. I have not read anything from this part of the world in this time period, and it was fascinating. For one thing, this author can write a scene and the reader is there! The surroundings, whether they are on a ship on the sea, in the deep woods, in a terrifying underground tunnel in darkness, or in the beautiful home of a wealthy aristocrat, simply come alive. The feel of wearing filthy sweaty stinking clothing and the feel of fine linen and silks against your body are so real. But to the story..

This is the story of Kerbouchard who is a young Celtic in in Britain when his mother is killed while his father has been away for four years trading and raiding. His father is a famous Corsair/trader/seaman/pirate who has traveled the world and brought home knowledge and customs from other cultures. Kerbouchard was trained as a young boy by the Druids associated with his mother’s family, but also had sailed with fishing vessels and had grown up both on the sea and in the forest. He escapes the men who murdered his mother and burned their house while he was not there, but he falls into the hands of pirates and becomes a galley slave. From there his adventures span a great deal of the civilized world. A great deal of the first half or so of the book take place in Cordoba in Spain which at the time is mostly moslem and very much into learning, books, and intellectual discussion.

I will say one thing from reading the many reviews of this book. Some criticize it because Kerbouchard is telling the story and he is proficient at everything so they consider he is too perfect. For one thing this is fiction – historical fiction but Kerbouchard is a fictitious character. His background and his insatiable quest for knowledge would make such a man – if he survives. He goes from the worst poverty to wealth and back again more times than I remember. He lives by is wit, but he is on a quest from the very beginning of the book. The quest is to find and rescue his father if he still lives, which is in question.

I love history and reading this book with no prior knowledge of the area or the history was amazing. I realize I had no idea how advanced the world was at that time in things like astronomy, geology, history, medicine, and just plain theory. I definitely will re-read this book as now I can savor it instead of reading to find out what will happen. I did struggle with the names – they are all middle-eastern names and very difficult for me to keep straight.

I can’t explain the depth of character this author has created with Kerbouchard. His way of thinking and of getting out of impossible situations is very very interesting. I don’t doubt that in real life such a man in that time period and place probably would not have survived some of them, but this is an adventure story. His constant quest for knowledge is truly inspiring as I know there have been and still are people who live to learn and are more or less obsessed by it.

My favorite part of the book comes some past the half way mark. It is a trek across many countries that I lost track of as the author uses the names they were called in the 12th century. Kerbouchard’s goal is to reach a castle where his father is being held by an Assassin King, but for safety, he becomes part of a caravan of traders. This is a trek of months and months, and it is just amazing that these treks were made. I had read about others where shepherds trekked for whole seasons across Afghanistan and Iraq, and this was similar except these were merchants. They went from one Fair to another trading and buying and selling. How they guarded one another and their loyalty to each other was just wonderful to read. The battle toward the end of this trek was perhaps the best scene written and most realistic I have ever read. If ever a reader was right there in a battle, it is this one.

I did not mean for this to be so long, but this book really caught me up in the story, the history, and the writing. At the back of the book the author says he will write two more books about Kerrbouchard. Sadly, Louis L’Amour died before he wrote those books. I am so glad he wrote this one.

There is some romance as this is a young man alone with no ties to anyone. But it is totally clean and several of the women he “falls for” are above him in station, virgins, and he is an honorable man and remains so.

I have to add the fascinating thing about the title, “The Walking Drum”. Imagine over a thousand people, some on horseback, some with wagons, but most of them walking, along with cattle, goats, and sheep. They continue from morning to night when they camp only to begin the next day. They have the Fairs where they spend a few days, but month after month they march, always prepared for attack which does not happen often but does happen. From the book:

“The walking drum….a heavy, methodical beat marking the step of each of us. That drum rode on a cart at the rear of our column, and the pace of the march could be made faster or slower by that beat. We lived with that sound, all of us, it beat like a great pulse for the whole company and for those others, too, who had their own drums to keep their pace.”

“Nightly camps were each a fortress, our columns like an army on the march. We awakened to a trumpet call, marched upon a second, and all our waking days were accompanied by the rhythmic throb of the walking drum.
We heard it’s muted thunder roll against the distant hills, through sunlight and storm. That drum was our god, our lord and master, and a warning to potential enemies.”
Zargelynd
This has to be one of the most compelling historical novels I have ever read. L'Amour transports you to this place and time as if you were whisked away in a time machine. It was written before Wikipedia and wide spread use of search engine's so the amount of research that he must have undertaken...by reading books...and visiting libraries had to haven taken nearly a lifetime. In the back of the book it is mentioned how well read and meticulous L'Amour was, having a personal collection of over 17,000 books. It shows. This is a must read if you love history. What a terrible shame that Mr. L'Amour passed away before he could complete anymore books in this planned series of his.
Goktilar
I have purchased this book for the second time, as I gifted my original copy to my brother who also loved it. I cant say enough about L'amour's writing. He is fairly straight forward and descriptive but not overwhelmingly so where it takes away from the story. You can also tell that this man has lived many an adventure and writes from a lot of experience.
This book to me, captures the journey of Man hood that the Man Character Mathurine goes through, the idea of becoming your own man, and sticking steadfastly to that ideal that one day, he will reach the other side of that place within himself. His is a journey of constant learning and testing of himself, meeting situations unfamiliar with a bravado and "fake it till you make it" quality, yet still confident in his skills that he has garnered thus far.
I dont want to give too much away, but this epic journey of daring, intrigue, adventure and longing make this book a must read for anyone, let alone for the young man seeking to make his way in the world.
Dorizius
Great audio recordings have a full cast of voice actors, music, and special effects.

Five star story and a three star cast of one equal a four star audiobook.

The protagonist accomplishes his goal of finding his father at the end of this meandering tale. An example of the meandering in this tale is when the protagonist climbs into a dark passage and descends for two days. The girl he’s with is at the top when be begins descending and then she’s at the bottom two days later when he emerges. What was the point of wasting words on that tangent? It didn’t advance the story. Why didn’t he take the easy, smart route with the girl?

The style of this first person tale told from the point of view of the protagonist reminded me of the “Gor” series by John Norman and “The Greyhawk Adventures Saga of Old City” by Gary Cygax.

Discs nine and ten talk about “The Walking Drum” marching beat the book is named after.