» » The Sailor from Gilbralter
Download The Sailor from Gilbralter epub book
ISBN:0394744519
Author: Marguerite Duras
ISBN13: 978-0394744513
Title: The Sailor from Gilbralter
Format: rtf txt mobi mbr
ePUB size: 1833 kb
FB2 size: 1810 kb
DJVU size: 1884 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Pantheon (February 12, 1986)
Pages: 318

The Sailor from Gilbralter by Marguerite Duras



The Sailor from Gibraltar. 1952) A novel by Marguerite Duras. A young man on holiday in Italy walks out on his mistress and meets Anna - the beautiful, enigmatic woman who lives on a white yacht. She takes on the young man temporarily as her lover, and recounts to him the story of the sailor. Used availability for Marguerite Duras's The Sailor from Gibraltar.

Gil Baltrar by Jules Verne, The Innocent Abroad by Mark Twain and Scruffy by Paul Gallico are only three of the classics which I'd like to mention here.

I confess that in spite of having studied French I had never read Marguerite Duras until picking up The Sailor From Gibraltar. It is a stunning gem of a book. I found myself wanting to put it down not because it wasn't good but because it was too effective. The kind of malaise, boredom, and drunken, sun-addled stupor in which the characters are adrift comes off the page and settles on the reader. The plot is deceptively simple; it starts with the narrator, who is on vacation from a Bartleby-like job in the Foreign Service, where he copies birth and death certificates

Uniform Title: Marin de Gibraltar. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The sailor from Gibralter, Marguerite Duras ; translated from the French by Barbara Bray.

Marguerite Duras wrote dozens of plays, film scripts, and novels, including The Ravishing of Lol Stein, The Sea Wall, and Hiroshima, Mon Amour. She's most well known for The Lover which received the Goncourt prize in 1984 and was made into a film in 1992. Barbara Bray translated several works by Marguerite Duras, including The Malady of Death, The Lover, and The War. In addition, she has translated Jean Genet, Ismail Kadare, and Tahar Ben Jelloun, and has received the French-American Foundation Translation Prize.

The Sailor from Gibraltar Quotes Showing 1-3 of 3. Sen bu olayı sıkça anlatıyorsundur, dedim. Marguerite Duras, THE SAILOR FROM GIBRALTAR. All Quotes Quotes By Marguerite Duras Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game.

Marguerite Duras, despite her fame for The Lover, is still high on my list of unappreciated writers. here's a nice article on her novel The Sailor from Gibraltar, which I highly recommend. both the article and the novel). This group does not accept members. This topic is not marked as primarily about any work, author or other topic.

So begins Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, an evocative and sensual novel about a young girl’s affair with a man 12 years her senior, which was first published in 1984. I read it back to back with another (supposedly) sensual novel, the (rather horrid) Hausfrau by Jill Alexander Essbaum, and they couldn’t be further apart - in mood, style or sheer literary power - even though they covered similar (sexual) territory. Thanks for tipping me off about The Sailor from Gibraltar. I’m anxious to get her other book, The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein, which is also in 1001 Books but it seems to be out of prin. long with much of her entire back catalogue (in translation that is). LikeLike.

The Sailor From Gibraltar ~~ Marguerite Duras. The Sailor From Gibraltar. The Complete Marguerite Duras Book List.

A young Frenchman and his mistress decide to accompany a mysterious woman in her obsessive search for a nameless sailor, thief, and murderer
Reviews: 5
Whitemaster
“I’ve always thought,” I said, “that anyone who makes someone else doubt the foundations of his morals hasn’t lived in vain.”

Our daughter loaned us the book. My wife and I both read it. I had never heard of Marguerite Duras. I am glad to have crossed paths with her at last. The Sailor From Gibraltar is an odyssey of sorts, and a strange kind of love story. A nameless disenchanted bureaucrat becomes infatuated with a woman pursuing an endless voyage to find a lost lover. Both loves are one-sided, obsessive, and blind. At the deepest level, the novel is a study in philosophy and psychology. It charts the murky depths of love and, certainly, life as well.
Written and translated in tough, lean prose, the book is a search for something that doesn’t exist. The story and its characters are full of contradictions. They don’t know their own minds—or hearts. And that’s what ultimately touches ours.
Amis
Marguerite Duras wrote dozens of books, mostly fiction. This is an early novel, recently translated for the first time into English by Barbara Bray. The translation is consistent with the feel of the book and with other Duras I've read, mostly in English, but a couple early on in French.

Reading almost any section of this book without knowing the author or when it was published and you would still know French, 1950s. Languid sums it up. The narrator has worked for eight years transcribing birth and death certificates for the government. His girl friend works in the same office. Everyone, including the narrator, agrees that this (both the job and the girl) need to be jettisoned, but our narrator can only bring himself to sigh, nod in agreement and do nothing.

Events transpire and for some reason he ditches everything: job, girl, suitcase with all his belongings, and joins the rich young beautiful widow who inherited endless wealth and a huge yacht from her United States husband who kills himself when she leaves him after a couple of years. She in turn spends her life, and the book, searching for her lover, a mysterious murderer known only as the Sailor from Gibraltar. If the plot sounds looney, it is, but it doesn't matter. The plot isn't the point. This, as with much of Duras, is a book to read when young, sitting for days at a cafe nursing a cup of coffee or a Pernod with a cigarette (yes, the cigarette is obligatory) while sighing every few minutes. First look at the yacht? "It filled me with a sort of crushing torpor."

Oh life. No one understands me, what shall I do? What is the meaning of my life? Why haven't I quit this pathetic excuse for a life that I am living and just go wherever the wind carries me (though with an endlessly rich and beautiful lover certainly makes it easier)?

Well written and evocative, but oh so of its time and place!
Felolv
An finely structured, existential novel, which remains quite consistent with Dura’s corpus. A bored and indifferent universal narrator abandons his girlfriend while on vacation in Italy for the mysterious American—a non-descript woman sailing the Meditarranian and coasts of West Africa in search of a lost lover. Frequently, underdeveloped, Duras’ fine prose nevertheless manages to capture ineffable relations to the past.
Hadadel
I confess that in spite of having studied French I had never read Marguerite Duras until picking up The Sailor From Gibraltar. It is a stunning gem of a book. I found myself wanting to put it down not because it wasn't good but because it was too effective. The kind of malaise, boredom, and drunken, sun-addled stupor in which the characters are adrift comes off the page and settles on the reader.

The plot is deceptively simple; it starts with the narrator, who is on vacation from a Bartleby-like job in the Foreign Service, where he copies birth and death certificates. He is oppressed by the heat, often drunken and annoyed with his mistress who insists on playing the tourist and has expectations of marriage. Feeling trapped, the narrator abandons her and his job in a little Italian coastal village in favor of Anna, a mysterious widow who searches the ocean in her yacht for the sailor from Gibraltar, a fugitive murderer with whom she had an affair as a young woman.

The real story takes place in the subtle nuances of the narrator's growing relationship with Anna, the crew of the yacht and the influence of the unseen sailor from Gibraltar. The characters are selfish, indulgent, and often ridiculous and yet it is compelling to watch them in their lazy and never ending quest for the sailor. Even these vapid individuals become existential fodder for Duras.

Indeed, seems to come out of the same world from which Albert Camus wrote The Stranger. In this world, the heat of the sun could make you quit your job, abandon your mistress and travel around the world or murder a man.

It is no surprise that The Sailor from Gibraltar was adapted for film. Duras conjures intense, haunting imagery. I can almost see the camera angles and the shimmer of sunlight reflecting off sand and water.

This is the second imprint from Open Letter Books that I have read and if their choices for works in translation continue to be this good, I will start to seek out more works from their catalog. Kudos to Barbara Bray for a dazzling translation.