Download The Last Life epub book
ISBN:0330375644
Author: Claire Messud
ISBN13: 978-0330375641
Title: The Last Life
Format: azw mbr lit txt
ePUB size: 1894 kb
FB2 size: 1859 kb
DJVU size: 1654 kb
Language: English
Category: Literary
Publisher: Picador (March 1, 2000)
Pages: 384

The Last Life by Claire Messud



A Harvest Book, Harcourt, Inc. Orlando Austin New York. All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced. Center for the Creative Arts where part of this book was written. Messud, Claire, 1966–. The last life a novel/by Claire Messud. p cm. ISBN 978-0-15-100471-3.

The Last Life was movingly written; not happy, but deeply affecting. The last third of the book was the best, as the protagonist reflects on what has happened and the personalities and motivations of family members driving the story's action. For me as a young middle-aged adult, the book raised a lot of interesting - sometimes painful, but also hopeful - questions about identity, choice, 'starting fresh,' and many other issues. Sagesse, the narrator, did a beautiful job of communicating the (o The Last Life was movingly written; not happy, but deeply affecting. Claire Messud is a philosophical French writer. The Last Life was both sprawling and fragmented, and if I were more interested in the main character's story it would've been easier to follow. Sagesse is a French teenager.

Messud, Claire, 1966-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The last life, Claire Messud.

A third-century Roman inscription at Timgad, in the south, exhorts: "The hunt, the baths, play and laughter: that's the life for me!" un-drenched and sparkling, dwelt in joy. But across the centuries, their voices-those resonating voices of Augustine and Camus-tell a different truth.

The Last Life (2000). About book: A coming of age story, a French-American girl named Sagese is trying to figure out all that entails being a half American-French girl growing up with French-Algerian heritage in metropolitan France. Dealing with an atypical mother/father and in-house living situation with the father's parents (Sagese's paternal grandparents), we follow as she deals with situations that a 15 year old girl must cope with  . Claire Messud's prose is enough to make one gasp, ruminate, grab a dictionary, or all three at once. Her writing is so robust, this book can not be read quickly. It demands a slower pace, all the better to absorb the audacious phrasing. This is the story of Sagasse, told in first person, and her coming of age.

The Last Life is that rare thing, a fast-moving philosophical novel masquerading as a bildungsroman. In her efforts at identity and affection, its heroine is increasingly alive to the subterfuges of narrative, forcing herself to sort through versions of reality. Her grandmother, for instance, relates one myth about her husband, only to have Carol undercut it entirely. The book basically concerns an adolescent girl (named Sagasse LaBasse) growing up in a very troubled family. This is a pretty worn topic. On the positive side, since the family is French-Algerian, the reader learns a lot about French and Algerian history, and a little about Algeria’s two most famous denizens, St. Augustine and Camus.

In the narrowest possible reading, The Last Life appears to be another entry in the well-worn coming-of-age genre, detailing as it does an adolescent girl's awkward, painful transition into adulthood. But told in reflection by the same girl 10 years later, Claire Messud's sprawling, beautifully wrought faux-memoir benefits from a much wiser perspective, exploring how three generations of knotty family history have profoundly shaped a young woman's identity. With graceful, enveloping prose, Messud leads her through the fickle cliques and stop-and-start romances of the average teenager while disturbing pieces of family history gradually come to light. At its core, The Last Life is about the importance of identity-sexual, ethnic, and familial-as a stabilizing force and the psychological scars collected by those who are robbed of its comforts.

Claire Messud was born in the United States in 1966. She was educated at Yale and Cambridge. Библиографические данные. The Last Life: A Novel Harvest reading guide.

The Last Life tells the story of the teenage Sagesse LaBasse and her family, French Algerian emigrants haunted by their history, brought to the brink of destruction by a single reckless act. Observed with a fifteen-year-old’s ruthless regard for truth, it is a novel about secrets and ghosts, love and honour, the stories we tell ourselves and the lies to which we cling. It is a work of stunning emotional power, written in prose of matchless iridescence and grace. Powerful, Gripping, dark at its heart, this is an almost faultless novel’ Evening Standard. Ms Messud has written a large and resonant novel that is as artful as it is affecting’ New York Times. Books by Claire Messud. The Emperor's Children. Ready for your next read?

Book summary: The Last Life. 1999 by claire messud. Sagesse LaBasse, the teenage protagonist of Claire Messud's The Last Life, lives in a fragile world held together by the secrets of its past. Her family owns the Hotel Bellevue, a summer retreat for the well-to-do, set on the cliffs of southern France; the view is back toward Algeria, which her paternal grandparents fled during its struggle for independence from France. The Last Life ultimately concerns itself with questions of fate and self-determination. was it fate? Is our ending inscribed in our beginning - and, if so, in whose beginning?" The "obvious answer," she says, is that we cannot escape our fate, that our choices are illusory.

The Last Life tells the story of the teenage Sagesse LaBasse and her family, French Algerian emigrants haunted by their history, brought to the brink of destruction by a single reckless act. Observed with a fifteen-year-old's ruthless regard for truth, it is a novel about secrets and ghosts, love and honour, the stories we tell ourselves and the lies to which we cling. It is a work of stunning emotional power, written in prose of matchless iridescence and grace. `Powerful, Gripping, dark at its heart, this is an almost faultless novel' Evening Standard `A joy to read. Messud's prose is lush, incantatory . . . her observations are funnily astute, brimming with wit and imagination . . . as elegant and precise as geometry' Independent `Mesmerizing . . . Ms Messud has written a large and resonant novel that is as artful as it is affecting' New York Times
Reviews: 7
Voodoogore
This is a hard book to read. Not only is the subject matter sad--even depressing--but also the structure and style of the novel make it a difficult book to read. It is literary fiction, perhaps not at its finest, but definitely at its most demanding. That said, there is much to recommend this novel by Claire Messud--just don't read it on the beach.

Told in the first person by Sagesse LaBasse, who recalls as a young adult the events of several of her most formative teenage years, the story takes place primarily in the south of France on the Mediterranean Sea. Sagesse describes her wealthy, but tortured, family's existence--refugees from Algeria who never quite fit in in France despite extraordinary business success. But even more devastating to them than always feeling like "the other" are the many dark secrets that plague and haunt the LaBasse family over several generations.

The plot line, such as it is, is secondary to the almost stream-of-consciousness dialogue carried on by Sagesse as she first narrates and then examines in depth each piece of the action. It is far more about the analysis--emotional and psychological--of what happens than anything else. And, yes, it can be quite tedious at times. But it's also like a flower, opening and probing the secrets of life, the secrets of what it means to be human.

If you enjoy serious literary fiction, this is a must-read. If you prefer your books to have a riveting storyline, skip it.

Aside to Kindle Readers: Originally published in 1999, this book has had a less-than-perfect translation to Kindle format. There are numerous errors--misspellings and missing apostrophes being the most blatant. It's a shame, but doesn't take away too much from the story. Most unfortunately, the second to the last sentence of the book is poetic--or it would be if there weren't a horrendous typo in it that nearly ruins it. But the human brain is smart enough to figure it out. It's just a shame...that's all.
Kabandis
The reviews of this book in the press have been great, but I found Claire Messud’s “The Last Life” to be very mixed. The book basically concerns an adolescent girl (named Sagasse LaBasse) growing up in a very troubled family. This is a pretty worn topic. On the positive side, since the family is French-Algerian, the reader learns a lot about French and Algerian history, and a little about Algeria’s two most famous denizens, St. Augustine and Camus. Also the author’s perspective on Sagasse’s severely disabled brother Etienne is inspiring; Messud and members of the LaBasse family consistently view Etienne as a full-fledged human. The author’s writing style vacillates between lyrical on the one hand and gushy and verbose on the other. Although some of the dialogue rings crystal clear and true, other dialogue seems suitable for a soap opera script. In addition to the major coming-of-age narrative, Messud provides many minor characters, cameos, and vignettes. However, she is not Dickens or Tolstoy, so the reader is sometimes left trying hard to keep track of sequences…to what purpose?
Zacki
Pages and pages of introspection, in the style of writers like Henry James. I like this kind of novels and the writer occasionally delights me with her descriptions and observations. But it's way too repetitious for me and, I think, some parts could have been cut out while still preserving, and probably more tightly crystallizing, the themes and "truths" within the story.

It's a story I could relate to but I wish it hadn't been too tedious to read.
Morad
Like many others reviewing this early novel by Claire Messud, I loved her breakout book The Emperor's Children. I realized after about 150 pages into this one, however, that I couldn't wait for it to end. I reads like a writing workshop. Yes, she can write beautifully, but what about the adage of show, not tell? This book is one long, long, long droning monologue, recited by a not very interesting young girl/young woman. Her quotidian dramas are made interesting only by the fact of her family's origins in French Algeria. It was more interesting to dip into wikepedia and read about the conflict there in the late 50's-early 60's, the pied noires, etc. The circular ponderous nature of Sagesse's memories and musings nearly drove me mad. (And that name! come off it, wisdom!) The only part of the novel that I really liked, that gripped me, was sans-Sagesse, and felt immediate rather than a trip down someone else's memory lane where you can't figure out a polite way of excusing yourself. That was the tale of how her adolescent father stayed in Algeria with his dying grandmother after the rest of the family escaped to France, and the country is collapsing in chaos. This book badly needed an editor to stop the writing and give it more focus. All in all, disappointing and definitely not recommended.
Jairani
Beautifully written. Deep thoughts and history of a young lady who grapples with her families past, their present and the potential future. A story of lost homelands and lost family. The story both engaged and haunts you.