Download Players epub book
ISBN:0345275705
Author: Don Delillo
ISBN13: 978-0345275707
Title: Players
Format: azw mbr lrf mobi
ePUB size: 1452 kb
FB2 size: 1687 kb
DJVU size: 1207 kb
Language: English
Category: Literary
Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1st edition (October 12, 1978)
Pages: 185

Players by Don Delillo



Don DeLill. s original, versatile, and, in his disdain of last year’s emotional guarantees, fastidiou. .Into our technology-ridden daily lives he reads the sinister ambiguities, the floating ugliness of America’s recent history. John Updike, The New Yorker. Lyrical, romantic and absorbin.What matters in is the peripheral movement, a surrealistic swirl of terrorism, anomie and sex, into which the central characters and the reader alike are ultimately consumed. Ardie Ivie, Los Angeles Times. A hard-edged, chilling work by an important American writer. Portions of this book have previously appeared in Esquire. DeLillo, Don. Players. Originally published: New York: Knopf, 1977.

The more you read both Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo, the more it becomes apparent that, for all their similarities, Pynchon defines his world in terms of underground versus over- (or above-)ground, while DeLillo defines his in terms of outside versus inside. They are not big substantive differences, they are more differences of nuance.

Players is Don DeLillo's fifth novel, published in 1977. It follows Lyle and Pammy Wynant, a young and affluent Manhattan couple whose casual boredom is overturned by their willing participation in chaotic detours from the everyday.

Pan Macmillan, 19 мая 2016 г. 0 Отзывы. In this remarkable novel of menace and mystery, Pammy and Lyle Wynant are an attractive, modern couple who seem to have it all. Yet behind their "ideal" life is a lingering boredom and quiet desperation: their talk is mostly chatter, their sex life more a matter of obligatory "satisfaction" than pleasure. And still they remain untouched, "players" indifferent to the violence that surrounds them, and that they have helped to create.

In Players DeLillo explores the dark side of contemporary affluence and its discontents. Pammy and Lyle Wynant are an attractive, modern couple who seem to have it all. Вперед →. – 1 из 48 –.

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). What elevates Players, however, from a thought-provoking thriller to the level of a small masterpiece is the effect of DeLillo's precise and poetic prose-a laser-like instrument of an intellect you can't help to observe with awe as it cuts, exposes, and illuminates even ordinary experience to reveal malignant truths one may have felt or suspected, but never seen. or been able to articulate before. Don DeLillo is the rare writer who makes other writers, me included, take up woodworking or suicide in despair.

A troubling satire of the romantic myth of stardom and the empty heart of rock and roll, more relevant than ever in our celebrity-obsessed times. Bucky Wunderlick is a rock and roll star. The first novel by Don DeLillo, author of White Noise (winner of the National Book Award) and Zero K At twenty-eight, David Bell is the American Dream come true. He has fought his way to the top, surviving office purges and scandals tobecome a top television executive.

In this remarkable novel of menace and mystery Pammy and Lyle Wynant are an attractive, modern couple who seem to have it all. Yet behind their "ideal" life is a lingering boredom and quiet desperation which leads both of them into separate but equally fatal adventures. And still they remain untouched, "players" indifferent to the violence that surrounds them, and that they have helped to create.
Reviews: 7
Ddilonyne
Of all his earlier novels, *Players* is the one that best anticipates the mature style of DeLillo's later masterworks. All the major themes and preoccupations are here, including foreshadowing of the topics that will become central to novels like *Libra,* *White Noise,* and *Mao II.* This makes *Players* an ideal place to start your discovery of this remarkable writer.

On the surface *Players* is a spare and simple story. Lyle and Pammy, an upwardly mobile New York City couple who've reached an interminable plateau in virtually every aspect of their lives, are bored. But this is no ordinary boredom. They are culturally, existentially, epically, mythologically, terminally bored. They're not sure how they got this way, they aren't even angry about it or with each other. There's no one or anything to really blame. They're still in love with each other, in fact. It's just that everything is so...well, empty somehow, so boring. What's even worse is that together, and separately, they don't know what to do about it. How do you go about *not* being bored in this day and age?

Pammy decides to take a vacation with a co-worker and his lover to Maine. Lyle, in the meantime, remains in Manhattan and becomes involved in a terrorist plot to plant a bomb in the New York Stock Exchange. These separate "vacations" from each other both end in violence and unexpected consequences, and yet, both Pammy and Lyle remain essentially unchanged, essentially still bored. If anything, they begin, especially in Lyle's case, to vanish altogether. For as Lyle becomes a "player" in the world of international terrorism and counter-terrorism he indiscriminately "plays" both sides, or, perhaps more accurately, all three, four, five, ten sides of the game and thereby loses himself in a state of complexity where he and you ((the reader)) begin to wonder if the most harrowing truth of all is that *no one* really understands the game they're playing, who's winning, or even who's side anyone is on.

What elevates *Players,* however, from a thought-provoking thriller to the level of a small masterpiece is the effect of DeLillo's precise and poetic prose--a laser-like instrument of an intellect you can't help to observe with awe as it cuts, exposes, and illuminates even ordinary experience to reveal malignant truths one may have felt or suspected, but never seen or been able to articulate before. Don DeLillo is the rare writer who makes other writers, me included, take up woodworking or suicide in despair. He's that good, *&#@ him!
Dodo
You can read the tea leaves of any DeLillo novel and see shadows of the WTC disaster, but they are more striking in this novel than any other. One of the main characters works for a grief counseling company in the WTC, her husband works on Wall Street and is casually drawn into a terrorist plot.
"Players" is heavily influenced by Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Agent" and Dostoyevsky's "Demons", but its unmistakably DeLillo. The terrorists in this book are not drawn by religious or political zealotry, they are almost offhand about their deadly work. As he will do later in "White Noise", DeLillo places a disaster in the foreground but finds the real drama in domestic interaction, in characters so caught up in lifestyle that the world around them is dull, unimportant.
In my opinion, "Players" is the transitional book in DeLillo's body of work. It is his first book to touch on his obsessive themes in a serious, sustained manner. However, it does not match the virtuosity of his later works. Not until "The Names" did DeLillo hit his stride, so don't expect as polished a book as those written in the 80s and 90s. But for DeLillo fans who have overlooked this work through the years, "Players" is a gruesome treat.
Daizil
Basically, this is the story of a couple that takes separate vacations. She goes to Maine with her friends, a gay couple, and we read about their interaction. Meanwhile, he is drawn into the political underground, where he becomes fascinated with some vague group's shadowy and violent tactics. DeLillo fans that have read "Mao II" will recognize this "two-path" structure. But this time, the juxtapositions of different family-member experiences didn't really resonate (at least with me) or seem to add up to much. Is this what he's communicating? "It occurred to her that this was the secret life of their involvement. It had always been there, needing only this period of their extended proximity to reveal itself. Disloyalty, spitefulness, petulance."
Heri
It's certainly not The Body Artist, but it also doesn't reach the heights of even his good novels like Mao II or Falling Man. This isn't to mention his masterpieces such as Libra, White Noise, or Underworld.
Mash
While Delillo is beginning to master the interplay of intellectualism and violence that so magnificently structures his best works, Players doesn’t seem to ever really get going. Although this one is credited with “predicting” the age of terrorism (and indeed, there is no question Deliilo has his fingure on the pulse of what would emerge as the war on terror), the ideas assembled here never really develop as anything more than an exploration of postmodenrn, commercialized malaise.