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ISBN:1585425540
Author: Erica Jong
ISBN13: 978-1585425549
Title: What Do Women Want?: Essays by Erica Jong
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ePUB size: 1512 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: TarcherPerigee (May 10, 2007)
Pages: 336

What Do Women Want?: Essays by Erica Jong by Erica Jong



Erica Jong's two rules of writing are never cut funny and keep the pages turning. And Jong delivers in these twenty-six essays. The timeless question: What do women want? This question is tackled by Erica Jong in her book entitled by the same inquiry. This book is more than a long answer it is reflection of spirit and Jong's own journey into discovering her identity. Jong, using her uncompromising prowess, delves into womanhood: mother, daughter, and herself.

First, "What do Women Want?" by Erica Jong. Jenni borrowed this from me ages ago and said it wasn't much good. What this book is is a collection of essays by Erica Jong with a catchy title. The essays therein don't necessarily answer the question on the cover. For those looking for an answer to that question, you will probably be disappointed.

Discover Erica Jong famous and rare quotes. One writes not by will but by surrender. What Do Women Want?: Bread, Roses, Sex, Power, Perennial. what is great poetry, after all, but the continuation of the human voice after death? Erica Jong. Voice, After Death, Great Poetry. I believe that there's a force of life in the universe, and that when we're writing or making music or painting, we're likely to connect with that flow. Believe, Writing, Flow. Interview with Whitney Joiner, logger.

Erica Jong's two rules of writing are "never cut funny" and "keep the pages turning. And Jong delivers in these twenty-six essays, coupling frank and risqu? stories about her own life with provocative pieces on her passion for politics, literature, Italy, and-yes-sex.

Author: Jong, Erica Criticism and interpretation History. Successful negotiating : the essential guide to thinking and working smarter Julia Tipler. ISBN: 0814470661 Author: Tipler, Julia, 1951- Publication & Distribution: New York. Miao zu : Jinping Tongchang Xiang Datangzi Cun Miao zu diao cha zu bian xie ; fen ce zhu bian Yin Yonglin. by Miao zu diao cha zu bian xie ; fen ce zhu bian Yin Yonglin. 00 (set) ; 1. 0 ea. Publication & Distribution: Kunming On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. What Do Women Want? : Bread, Roses, Sex, Power.

Personal Name: Jong, Erica. by Dougal Dixon and Rupert Matthews. 95 Author: Dixon, Dougal. Publication & Distribution: London.

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If women want power they better ditch their envious competitive nature towards other females. When your ego overrides the big picture of $ and you can't support other women then you will never have true power and you don't deserve it. by She’s rocking the 90s host look on the cover. R2, I’m a woman and I pretty much agree. Women have power, but it’s not men’s power. And I don’t think that will ever change.

Erica Jong's two rules of writing are "never cut funny" and "keep the pages turning." And Jong delivers in these twenty-six essays, coupling frank and risqu? stories about her own life with provocative pieces on her passion for politics, literature, Italy, and-yes-sex. Originally published in 1998, this updated edition features four new essays. What Do Women Want? offers a startlingly original look at where women are-and where they need to be in the twenty-first century: Are women better off today than they were twenty-five years ago? Has burning pre-nup agreements become the new peak of romance? Why do our greatest women writers too often get dissed and overlooked? Why do powerful women scare men? And who is the perfect man? How does the mother-daughter relationship influence cycles of feminism and backlash? Will Hillary become president? What is sexy?
Reviews: 7
Kemath
This is an interesting and diverse collection of papers about role models and authors with analyses and compromises that make relationships work or fall. Erica shares her intimate knowledge of the people and subjects she writes about exposing bold insights into the life and thoughts of writers. She is particularly awesome in delivering the brutal truth of taboo subjects like incest. I am seeking a mature woman's knowledge, experience and opinion of lust, love and life. She gives me that.
OCARO
decent read
olgasmile
I love this wonderful book of insightful essays by the celebrated author of Fear Of Flying. My favorite essay in this collection is the one about the classic Victorian novel Jane Eyre by Charlolette Bronte. She sees Jane Eyre as a budding feminist struggling to survive and come of age during a time of male domination, and when women were denied equal rights.
Jane Eyre is the study of a strong willed woman determined to be herself and find her place in a male dominated society

Erica Jong does an excellent job of analyzing Jane Eyre character and the traits that make her a strong woman, and a role model for all of us.

Richard Shaw is the author of Smart Like Shakespeare and Writing As Consolation (Kindle).
Clever
I am a great fan of Erica Jong so I couldn't miss this brilliant collection of essays. I adore her style, simple, smart, direct. Her way of depicting the female universe is sometimes incredibly moving, in other moments provocative but always shamelessly sincere. I love this book because each time you read an essay, it is somehow like discovering something new, unexpected about yourself. You are never just passively 'dragged'; you can't do without reflecting even when not necessary you identify yourself in what you read. The essays are stimulating, catchy. Among others, you will read about the immortal literary myth of Jane Eyre, Nabokov's forever young Lolita or an engaging point of view on the modern icon of Princess Diana. All the essays are different from each other, they look into different aspects of the female psyche. However, they have one umbilical cord, the meaning of which is condensed in the title. What do women want is an immersion in a vivacious stream of reflections on women's constantly evolving role in our modern society.

The edition is very nice too, nice cover page and layout, good readability.
Nidora
I picked up this book by chance in the library, having read Erica's "Fear of Flying" before, and falling into the trap of the catchy title.

It is always a risky proposition to ask such a blanket question as she does about all women, and even more is to give an answer that she does - bread,roses, sex, power. It is only symptomatic that Erica does not say - love. And while reading the book, and remembering her Fear, one understands that she is a victim of such a deep-seated inferiority complex, probably greatly enhanced by her psychiatrist husband - a complex of a lonely unloved woman who is suffering from not getting enough attention and admiration, and who as a result had become quite a valiant fighter, but perhaps not a lover.

She writes with such venom about Princess Diana, with her envy reaches a point of bizarre when she compares Diana's wedding in St-Paul cathedral with her own hippie-style; she viciously ridicules the poor Princess, who perhaps did not have the intelligence of Margaret Thatcher, but what made people love her is that she was simply... stunningly beautiful; an embodiment of a dream, a true Princess, noble and refined in looks and grace, and it was indeed enough for the whole world to admire - seemingly a fact that Erica could not forgive. Ms. Jong seems to rejoice in Princess's tragic death, vindictively, although unhappy Diana was looking for the same as the author - love, maybe more than sex and power. Somehow it was quite repulsive to read the pages where Erica hisses as a poisonous snake, attacking Diana's pearls - while herself on my edition of the book she wears them on the cover page.

One more point is Ms. Jong's complete misunderstanding of Nabokov's Lolita. First of all, although she mentions Edgar Allen Poe, she nevertheless does not make a connection between Annabel Lee and Humbert's first love, who is Annabel and whose reincarnation Lolita is. For a writer this is a terrible miss.

Then in a bout of a militant defiance for the sake of nonconformism, Erica-Erato tries to rationalize Humbert's behavior towards Lolita, going as far as to say that fourteen years old girls have sexuality. Well, it is true, of course, although that sexuality usually does not imply being sexually exploited by a step father. How could Erica miss the point that Lolita hates Humbert??? This comes from a writer who in other parts of the same opus would speak of the mystery of touch, of chemistry...What is strange that Ms. Jong, while claiming to be a feminist, somehow completely disregards obvious emotions of Lolita, so masterly depicted by Nabokov, and taking Humbert's side in justifying his story as a "response" to Lolita's unspoken desire. This is quite an assumption, worthy of someone whose mind was indeed damaged by the influence of a shrink, as Erica's husband was.
It is ironic that Ms. Jong seems to take "Lolita" for face value, which exposes her lack of imagination - the story of Lolita is as credible as de Sade's writings, and it is their extreme that entertains the mind, however it is a grave mistake to project such fantasies on reality, considering the events described are "normal" - which she tries to do with Lolita. Ms. Jong is completely oblivious to the point that Lolita is poetry noir; and for its parable value, Nabokov said that this book shows how selfishness and cruelty destroy love and life...

Perhaps for someone who had seen Thanatos in such a lively vivacious building as the church of Santa Maria Salute in Venice, it should be easier to see it in Lolita, but alas on this point Erica seems to be confused between Eros and Thanatos and who belongs where. Could it be a general problem of a very competitive person, obsessed with self-protection and survival? Maybe; but maybe this is why she misses one thing that many people, including women, want - love.

One last and good point about this book is that when Erica discusses an "ideal man", she is suddenly very reasonable and wise - "an ideal man is someone you love and who loves you in return" - I would only wish she would employ this argument in judging Princess Diana's life and that of Lolita.

Overall, a shallow book somewhat; surely Erica is not a poet as Nabokov is, and although she seems to know that she is pure prose, she still dares to speak about things that seem to be beyond her imagination and sublime. A disappointment.
Made-with-Love
love her books all over again...
Tiv
The timeless question: What do women want? This question is tackled by Erica Jong in her book entitled by the same inquiry.
This book is more than a long answer it is reflection of spirit and Jong's own journey into discovering her identity.
Jong, using her uncompromising prowess, delves into womanhood: mother, daughter, and herself. She shares her vulnerability and the complexity of the modern woman.
The lore of sex and all its broad implication, sex is much more than a strong member and a moist recipient, it is about touch, feel, and involving the entire mind, spirit, and body. She lays out the recipe for the perfect man or a mixture of men.
In the end What do women want? By Erica Jong is a composition of the inner being of the complexity of the women psyche.