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ISBN:0748615539
Author: Antony Rowland
ISBN13: 978-0748615537
Title: Holocaust Poetry: Awkward Poetics in the Work of Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Ted Hughes
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ePUB size: 1781 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2005)
Pages: 208

Holocaust Poetry: Awkward Poetics in the Work of Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Ted Hughes by Antony Rowland



Camp poetics and Holocaust icons in the poetry of Sylvia Plath 'Beauty. remains "a brief gasp between one cliche? and another"' : awkward poetics in Geoffrey Hill's The triumph of love 'There's something for everyone in a myth' : Auschwitz-Birkenau and the classics in Tony Harrison's Prometheus Ted Hughes, peephole metaphysics, and the poetics of extremity. Personal Name: Harrison, Tony, 1937- Criticism and interpretation. Personal Name: Hill, Geoffrey Criticism and interpretation. Personal Name: Hughes, Ted, 1930- Criticism and interpretation

Under the umbrella term 'Holocaust poetry', this book argues that distinctions need to be made between the writing of Holocaust survivors and those who were not involved in the events of 1933 to 1945.

Dueling book cover. ay the best design win! Start Voting. Category: History & Criticism, Literature & Fiction, Poetry.

Under the umbrella term 'Holocaust poetry', this book argues that distinctions need to be made between the writing of Holocaust survivors and those who were not involved in the events of 1933 to 1945.

The book illustrates that 'awkward' poetics enable post-Holocaust poets to provide ethical responses to history, and avoid aesthetic prurience. This probing and sensitive reassessment of Holocaust-related poetry will appeal to academics and students working in the areas of Holocaust Studies, contemporary poetry, and twentieth-century literature in general. a brief gasp between one cliché and another"': Awkward Poetics in Geoffrey Hill's 'The Triumph of Love' 3, 'There's something for everyone in a myth': Relativism, Humanism and the Classics in Tony Harrison's 'Prometheus' 4, Ted Hughes, Peephole Metaphysics. and the Poetics of Extremity Conclusion Bibliography Index.

Holocaust Poetry: Awkward Poetics in the Work of Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Ted Hughes. Books and CDs. A personal appeal.

26 Antony Rowland, Holocaust Poetry: Awkward Poetics in the Work of Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Ted Hughes (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2005), p. 87. 27 Brearton, ‘Ceontaphs of Snow’, p. 187. 28 Hill, ‘LXXVI’, p. 40. 29 Rowland, p. 30 Maurice Blanchot, The Writing of the Disaster, trans. Boswell, Matthew, 'Reading Holocaust Poetry: Genre, Authority and Identification', The Future of Memory, ed. by Rick Crownshaw, Jane Kilby and Antony Rowland (Oxford and New York: Berghahan, 2010), pp. 167-179.

Holocaust Poetry: Awkward Poetics in the Work of Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison, and Ted Hughes by Antony Rowland. 00 (price subject to change: see ) Asin: 0748615539 Canada United Kingdom Germany France Japan.

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Tony Harrison's poetry is barbaric. In ‘Them & ’, the schoolteacher refers to the young poet as a barbarian because of his working-class accent; this is not the particular sense of the word that I wish to evoke. An adequate representation of the Holocaust remains a lacuna in post-war British culture, but this has not deterred a number of poets, including Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Jon Silkin and Harrison himself, from engaging with it. To ignore the Holocaust would be to leave it shrouded, as the Nazis intended, in silence. Hence this book highlights Harrison's mediated version of the Holocaust. This does not mean that his work is antithetical to that of Levi: both are concerned with issues such as class, humanism, poetry, and the classics.

The first critical study of post-Holocaust poetry in Britain.Under the umbrella term 'Holocaust poetry', this book argues that distinctions need to be made between the writing of Holocaust survivors and those who were not involved in the events of 1933 to 1945. This study focuses on the post-Holocaust writers Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Ted Hughes, while also stressing the links between them and the Holocaust poetry of Paul Celan, Miklós Radnóti, Primo Levi and János Pilinszky.Developing his theory of 'awkwardness' Antony Rowland argues that post-Holocaust poetry can play an important part in our understanding of Holocaust writing by stressing its self-conscious, imaginative engagement with the Holocaust, as well as the literature of survivors. The book illustrates that 'awkward' poetics enable post-Holocaust poets to provide ethical responses to history, and avoid aesthetic prurience. This probing and sensitive reassessment of Holocaust-related poetry will appeal to academics and