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ISBN:0151787336
Author: Virginia Woolf
ISBN13: 978-0151787333
Title: A Room of One's Own
Format: lrf azw rtf lit
ePUB size: 1268 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Harcourt Brace & Company; 1st edition (November 7, 1991)
Pages: 125

A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf



One can only show how one came to hold whatever opin-ion one does hold. One can only give one's audience the chance of drawing their own conclusions as they observe the limita-tions, the prejudices, the idiosyncrasies of the speaker. Fiction here is likely to contain more truth than fact. Therefore I pro-pose, making use of all the liberties and licences of a novelist, to tell you the story of the two days that preceded my coming here-how, bowed down by the weight of the subject which you have laid upon my shoulders, I pondered it, and made it work in and out of my daily life A book lay beside me and, opening it, I turned casually enough to Tennyson. And here I found Tennyson was singing: There has fallen a splendid tear From the passion-flower at the gate.

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf, first published in September 1929. The work is based on two lectures Woolf delivered in October 1928 at Newnham College and Girton College, women's constituent colleges at the University of Cambridge. An important feminist text, the essay is noted in its argument for both a literal and figurative space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by men.

A Room of One’s Own opened Woolf up to the charges – snobbery, aestheticism – by that time habitually laid at the Bloomsbury gate by the generation that came of age in the late Twenties. To an extent, the accusations are just: Woolf is concerned with the fate of women of genius, not with that of ordinary women; her plea is that we create a world in which Shakespeare’s sister might survive her gift, not one in which a miner’s wife can have her rights to property; Woolf’s passion is for literature, not for universal.

A Room of One’s Own. Virginia Woolf. Last updated Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 13:00. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on the 24th of October, 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women's colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. While this extended essay in fact employs a fictional narrator and narrative to explore women both as writers A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women's colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. The essay examines whether women were capable of producing, and in fact free to produce work of the quality of William Shakespeare, addressing the limitations that past and present women writers face. All I could do was to offer you an opinion upon one minor point-a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction; and that, as you will see, leaves the great problem of the true nature of woman and the true nature of fiction unsolved. I have shirked the duty of coming to a conclusion upon these two questions-women and fiction remain, so far as I am concerned, unsolved problems.

Context Virginia Woolf was born Virginia Stephen in 1882 into a prominent and intellectually well-connected family. Her formal education was limited, but she grew up reading voraciously from the vast library of her father, the critic Leslie Stephen. Context Virginia Woolf was born Virginia Stephen in 1882 into a prominent and intellectually well-connected family. Her youth was a traumatic one, including the early deaths of her mother and brother, a history of sexual abuse, and the beginnings of a depressive mental illness that plagued her intermittently throughout her life and eventually led to her suicide in 1941.

Virginia Woolf's seminal feminist tract, "A Room of One's Own" justifies the need for women to possess intellectual freedom and financial independence. It is much more important to be oneself than anything else. Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own.

One can only give one’s audience the chance of drawing their own conclusions as they observe the limitations, the prejudices, the idiosyncrasies of the speaker. Therefore I propose, making use of all the liberties and licences of a novelist, to tell you the story of the two days that preceded my coming here - how, bowed down by the weight of the subject which you have laid upon my shoulders, I pondered it, and made it work in and out of my daily life. Thought - to call it by a prouder name than it deserved - had let its line down into the stream. It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting the water lift it and sink it until - you know the little tug - the sudden conglomeration of an idea at the end of one’s line: and then the cautious hauling of it in, and the careful laying of it out?

Why is it that men, and not women, have always had power, wealth, and fame? Woolf cites the two keys to freedom: fixed income and one’s own room. Foreword by Mary Gordon.
Reviews: 7
Iphonedivorced
An essay written in the late 1920s about women's writing. Why wasn't Shakespeare a woman? Why did Jane Austen hide her manuscripts from guests? What makes good writing? What makes women's writing? Are a woman's sentences different from a man's sentences?

This book is witty, from the first moment when the author tries to cross the lawn of an Oxbridge college and is stopped by a beadle because only the fellows and scholars (all male) are allowed here. Later she notes wryly that the few women's colleges have no such beadle, and none of the endowments of the men's colleges.

What a woman needs in order to write is a room of one's own and five hundred pounds a year.

When she wrote, women had only had the vote in Britain for less than a decade, and married women had only been allowed to own their own property for a bare forty years. Women's education is no longer the issue it was when the book was written and it is much easier today for a woman to be independent. Still, A Room of One's Own remains an entertaining read and the issues it raises are by no means resolved.
Pameala
Rating is for copy, not Woolf's story. This is not a real book. This copy is retyped in small font with reduced line space and smashed together. Chapter after chapter appears right after another without even a line break, let alone a page break. Impossible to read for relaxation. Makes your eye hurt.
Gorisar
100 years later, she still inspires great insights into the common heritage of women. In eloquent, often poetic language, mrs Woolf makes us see the world through the eyes of Shakespeare's sister. She makes us see how women's toil has barred women from participating in the learned world. We shall not excuse ourselves for producing our offspring, but with modernity comes the responsibility to seize the opportunity to be educated, writing, productive citizens in more than one way. We shall not let ourselves be ignored or set aside, because our experiences are no less important than those of men. And our experience is the source of a different writing than that of men. Thank you for making me proud of my gender.
Ffan
I always forget how great Virginia Woolf's writing is. This is an essay noting the absence of women's writing voices throughout history and she makes note that women need a room of their own (which throughout history they have not had being forced to write in common rooms when they wrote) and independent means (which until very recent history women's income was claimed by their husband). Her point being that women need independence if they are to have an independent writing voice.
Shezokha
A Room of One’s Own is of course canonical and hardly needs another recommendation. The almost flippant tone with which Wolff skewers male artistic superiority with arguments while simultaneously refuting the same idea with a style itself ingenious etches in one’s soul the plight of women in the early twentieth century.

And, of course, the book is almost a victim of its own success. Few women in Western countries are now dissuaded from having an artistic career. The women’s movement has, so to speak, moved on to demands like equal pay.

So I’ll merely point out one perspective which may have been overlooked by some readers. That is, that Woolf’s cause is completely centered around the problems of first world women. Basically, Woolf argues that women do not have the access to the wealth or education that men have and, as a result, have not produced an artistic genius like Shakespeare. Fair enough. But how many women in the period following the First World War were concerned about having an outlet for their creativity? Were not women in many parts of the world so bereft of even their natural human rights so as not to over worry about outlets for creativity?

For all its indisputable genius, A Room of One’s Own then may arguably be charged with a mixed legacy. Yes, it highlighted the need for privileged women to be equals of men in their access to the fonts of creativity. But it also may have tended to direct feminism to a first world perspective leaving out the voices of billions of women who Woolf, for all her literary aplomb, does not seem overly concerned about, at least in this work.

Literary classic? Undoubtedly. Mixed effect on the direction of twentieth century feminism? A distinct possibility.
Whitehammer
One of the best books I read in 2016.

She should be one of the most humorous women in Britain at her time. It was supposed to be a speech. Putting a lot of discursive aside, her speech started with Women and Fiction and what she had experienced and what had inspired her about the topic she supposedly gave speech to Newham Girls College. Here main theme, "numerous generations of unsung unnoticed unjusted women paved the way for what women at her era could attain was remarkable, and the girls should fight and stand on their corpses' and souls' behalf", was so strong and so well versed.
TheJonnyTest
This is the first I have ever read of Virginia Woolf. I found it a fascinating read. I came away learning new things and realizing women have felt inferior for a very long time. I hadn't realized this book is one of the beginnings of the feminist movement.
This book is not only an enjoyable and fairly quick read, but it is also an important milestone in not only feminist literature, but literature as a whole. Woolf's amusing and sharp assessments of the way men view women to be inferior, particularly in skill and intellegence, is (at least somewhat) relevent even today. She rightfully stresses the importance of every woman having both a room and money of her own. Without those two things, she can not be truely independant. A must for any lover of feminism or for anyone with a taste for short, smart books.