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ISBN:0140443878
Author: Émile Zola,Douglas Parmee
ISBN13: 978-0140443875
Title: The Earth: La Terre (Penguin Classics)
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Penguin Classics (October 30, 1980)

The Earth: La Terre (Penguin Classics) by Émile Zola,Douglas Parmee



The Earth: La Terre (Penguin Classics). The Earth: La Terre (Penguin Classics). mile Zola, Douglas Parmée (Translator).

Emile Zola centers his epic novel The Earth on nature and the important elements that are at the forefront is the natural landscape and how families and traditions play a role in its existence. The story takes place in rural France during the late 19th century and is a part of the Rougot-Macquart series that focused upon the harsh structures of a farming community. Vizetelly was jailed for 3 months for indecency by uptight Victorians, but he really should have been jailed for the bowdlerizations.

Translated with an introduction by. Douglas parmée. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Except in the United States of America, this book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher's prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition.

mile Zola, Douglas Parmée (Translator). Published June 26th 1980 by Penguin Classics (first published 1887). 0140443878 (ISBN13: 9780140443875). In 1888, Zola's translator, Vizatelly, was prosecuted for obscene libel for his translation of Zola's La Terre (The Earth), and was fined £100; and when he reissued Zola's works in 1889 he was again prosecuted, fined £200, and imprisoned for three months. To my mind, this is one of Zola's better novels, but I understand why it might not get as much attention as some of his others.

Douglas Parmée's translation vividly conveys the naturalistic tone of the original in clear, contemporary English. Emile Zola (1840-1902) was the leading figure in the French school of naturalistic fiction. His principal work, Les Rougon-Macquart, is a panorama of mid-19th century French life, in a cycle of 20 novels which Zola wrote over a period of 22 years, including Au Bonheur des Dames (1883), The Beast Within (1890), Nana (1880), and.

Actually, I didn’t like them much either – it was the quantity rather than the quality which turned me off about half way through.

When Jean Macquart arrives in the peasant community of Beauce, where farmers have worked the same land for generations, he quickly finds himself involved in the corrupt affairs of the local Fouan family. His principal work, Les Rougon-Macquart, is a panorama of mid-19th century French life, in a cycle of 20 novels which Zola wrote over a period of 22 years, including Au Bonheur des Dames (1883), The Beast Within (1890), Nana (1880), and The Drinking Den (1877). Imprint: Penguin Classics.

MILE ZOLA (1840-1902) was a prolific French writer and the most important exemplar of the literary school of naturalism. He was a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus. He was nominated for the first and second Nobel Prize in Literature in 1901 and 1902. The following is a small collection of 11 modern translations, a mix of EPUB or PDF formats: THE BEAST WITHIN (Penguin Classics, 2007). Translated by Roger Whitehouse. THE EARTH (Penguin Classics, 1980). Translated by Douglas Parmée. - EPUB . GERMINAL (Penguin Classics, 2004). Translated by Roger Pearson. lt; < < PREV NEXT . 

Zola, with the book of the Rougon-Macquart under his arm, salutes the statue of Balzac. Early in his life, Zola discovered the work of Honoré de Balzac and his famous cycle La Comédie humaine. This had a profound impact on Zola, who decided to write his own, unique cycle. The Earth (La Terre); first trans. by Douglas Parmee in 1980. ISBN 978-0-14-044387-5 (re-issued 2002). The Earth; first trans. by Brian Nelson in 2016. Oxford World's Classic. ISBN 978-0199677870 (2016). The Rougon-Macquart Novels of Emile Zola (for English-speaking Readers) provides an American enthusiast's introduction, insights and synopses. Le Compagnon des Rougon-Macquart : 1300+ pages (in french).

An old French peasant, Fouan, divides his farmland among his three children, only to be astonished by their ingratitude and greed
Reviews: 7
kinder
Emile Zola centers his epic novel The Earth on nature and the important elements that are at the forefront is the natural landscape and how families and traditions play a role in its existence. Or as Douglas Parmee emphasizes in the introduction, it is a story of hereditary and environment. The story takes place in rural France during the late 19th century and is a part of the Rougot-Macquart series that focused upon the harsh structures of a farming community. The Fouan and Buteau family live in a small village in the fictitiously named Rognes within Aix-en-Provence, an place where its dwellers thrive on the agrarian way of life.

Zola was part of the literary movement of naturalism that swept the late 1880s up to 1921 and a response nature’s progression of the land but also transitions that occurred within human nature. Especially, after great conflicts before the Great War that showed signs that modern ways of life was taking precedence and conflicts that emerged with the Franco-Prussian war that Zola wrote in The Debacle. It is clearly understood throughout the novel with the countryside and the daily routines of the main characters of the family as they work on their farm and cultivate the land and animals. Their responsibility is to maintain and to preserve centuries of tradition that is symbolic to the sustenance of life, birth, marriage, and death as well as history. But what appears to be predominant before the previous is taking care of the land, which has been an ancient economic and social construct since civilization began under the system of feudalism. And the families such as the Fouan came from a lineage of serfs of the Rognes-Bouqueval family that left remnants within a burial site located among half-buried stones at a demolished castle. Indeed, significant to the history of the family, maintain their class and social standing within the region, i.e. their name and their wealth. However, as Zola suggests with characters such as Fouan’s son named Jesus Christ, this part of the novel almost breathes a cross between a D.H. Lawrence novel and Ingmar Bergman film that usually contains an underlying and deep symbolic meaning of existentialism and philosophy and religion in the midst. But Jesus Christ, known for his flatulence is a subtle symbol placed in the novel as comic relief and one to not to take things too seriously and the least religious of the characters in the book; Zola shows how the characters challenge conventionality and morality with much vivid imagery.

The Earth is a novel filled with unpredictable moments that may surprise readers to the story’s conclusion. And it is a story embedded with the history of a family and the land that they fought to preserve. For the first-time Emile Zola reader or the curious, it is a novel that leaves room for discussion.
Malanim
There are two English translations of `La Terre`, the first was by Henry Vizetelly in 1888, it is freely available on Internet Archive, Gutenberg and in later re-prints. Vizetelly was jailed for 3 months for indecency by uptight Victorians, but he really should have been jailed for the bowdlerizations. Luckily in 1980 Parmee made an excellent translation for Penguin Classics (as `The Earth`), which, as of this review, is the most recent available. Amazon lists it as out of print but this is not accurate, it can still be purchased new (but apparently not on Amazon!). The problem is Penguin recycles it's ISBN numbers so the original 1980 Penguin edition is out print and the new 1990's edition (new cover, same otherwise) is not showing up in Amazon's database.

`La Terre` never entirely succeeds as `Germinal` did, the work most comparable. It is am ambitious book that could have been epic and one of his very best, but Zola tries to do too much and the energy is diffused. There are over 100 named characters, many with multiple names making at least 150 names, plus the many interrelated family relationships between each. This requires significant genealogical memory and the reward is not entirely satisfying. Zola was trying to recreate a whole rural farming village but aesthetically it didn't come together. Unlike in `Germinal` which has class struggle for a brighter future, there is no larger theme of social justice. The first 200 pages are slow, and the final 50 are like an antiquated picaresque Dickens novel with all the loose ends tied up in an epic single afternoon of action. However unlike Dickens there are no happy endings here!

On the positive side, it's Emile Zola. Zola is a genius at choosing and describing detail so the reader has a fair idea what "A Day in the Life of a Peasant" was like, and the book is worth reading for its anthropological aspects alone. It is comically scatological, which Zola did on purpose since the novel is about the earth (night soil, etc..), "dark humor" at its best, who knew Zola could be so funny. But this comes across a bit pejorative, highlighting the worst aspects of the rural and poor.

It's not a bad novel, but I don't think it achieved what Zola intended, and aesthetically isn't as fully realized as `Germinal`. If your a fan of Zola you will probably enjoy it, but not before some of his better known works.

While reading the novel I wished I had a complete list of the characters. I've since found an old book called "A Zola Dictionary" (1912) which contains a list which I've re-formatted for the web. See the comments section below for the URL, it is very helpful.
kewdiepie
This novel comes near the end of Zola's 20-book cycle, Les Rougon-Macquart. It's a powerful work. Zola refuses to pull his punches. Life for the peasants of mid-19th C. France was not idyllic, full of hardship, self-interest to the point of cruelty, and endless work. L'Assommoir, the seventh in the series (the title doesn't translate well--it's something like "The Drinking Den"), deals with the urban underclass and (not surprisingly) alcoholism; it's a tough book, too, but it has a central figure we root for; La Terre, is more of a group portrait. I realize that I've made it sound like a tough read;l I hope that doesn't drive you away. Zola is a terrific writer, and this is among his best--along with L'Assomoir, Germinal, Nana, and several others.
Ann
Zola is the saddest writer in the world
Amhirishes
Wrong book...
Painwind
Zola's masterpiece, a French King Lear, though the poetry is much "earthier".

The translation is excellent, though there's another good version in Penguin, if you don't care to buy a hardcover.

This novel is far more important than GERMINAL, which, though a great book, is less a masterpiece than EARTH.

The other Zola novel that needs to be read is THE BEAST IN MAN, not his masterpiece but a literary novel that's also a gripping read.