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ISBN:0520261623
Author: Willis Barnstone,Ching-Po Ko,Zedong Mao
ISBN13: 978-0520261624
Title: The Poems of Mao Zedong
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ePUB size: 1651 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: University of California Press (January 1, 2010)
Pages: 168

The Poems of Mao Zedong by Willis Barnstone,Ching-Po Ko,Zedong Mao



by Zedong Mao, Willis Barnstone, Ching-po K. Home The Poems of Mao Tse-Tung. Translation, Introduction and Notes by Willis Barnstone by Zedong Ma. .

by Zedong Mao (Author), Willis Barnstone (Translator), Willis Barnstone (Introduction), Ching-Po Ko (Translator). Mao Zedong, leader of the revolution and absolute chairman of the People's Republic of China, was also a calligrapher and a poet of extraordinary grace and eloquent simplicity.

The Poems of Mao Zedong. Translations, introduction, and notes by willis b arnstone. Willis Barnstone's introduction, his short biography of Mao and brief history of the revolution, and his note~ on Chinese vers. fication all combine to enrich the Western reader's understanding of Mao's poetry. Praise for the translations ofWillis Barnstone. This book is printed on Natures Book, which contains 50% post-consumer waste and meets the minimum requirements of ANSI/NISO Z3. 8 -1992 (R 1997) (Permanence of Paper). who years ago when I was a student in Paris spoke with enthusiasm about a Chinese poet Mao Zedong, when no one else seemed to know or care. Mao Zedong, Willis Barnstone. Скачать (pdf, . 8 Mb).

Mao Zedong (1893–1976), the first Chairman of the Communist Party of China and leader of the People's Republic of China for nearly 30 years, wrote poetry, starting in the 1920s, during the Red Army's epic retreat during the Long March of 1934-1936, and after coming to power in 1949. In spite of Mao's political radicalism he was artistically conservative, opting to use traditional Chinese forms.

Guy Davenport did a translation of a famous poem by Mao Zedong; the form of this translation is almost unique in American letters. The first is from The Poems of Mao Tse-Tung (1972), translated by Willis Barnstone in collaboration with Ko Ching-Po: A hard west wind, in the vast frozen air wild geese shriek to the morning moon, frozen morning moon. Horse hooves shatter the air and the bugle sobs. The grim pass is like iron yet today we will cross the summit in one step, cross the summit. Before us green-blue mountains are like the sea, the dying sun like blood. Shatter the air is a bit much, but all in all, the above is a lot closer in meaning to what the forty-one-year-old Mao Zedong wrote

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Book Description: Mao Zedong, leader of the revolution and absolute chairman of the People's Republic of China, was also a calligrapher and a poet of extraordinary grace and eloquent simplicity.

Mao Zedong, also transliterated as Mao Tse-tung, and commonly referred to as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese Communist revolutionary, guerrilla warfare strategist, Marxist political philosopher, and leader of the Chinese Revolution. He was the architect and founding father of the People's Republic of China (PRC) from its establishment in 1949, and held control over the nation until his death in 1976. Mao Zedong, also transliterated as Mao Tse-tung, and commonly referred to as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese Communist revolutionary, guerrilla warfare strategist, Marxist political philosopher, and.

Mao Zedong, leader of the revolution and absolute chairman of the People's Republic of China, was also a calligrapher and a poet of extraordinary grace and eloquent simplicity. The poems in this beautiful edition (from the 1963 Beijing edition), translated and introduced by Willis Barnstone, are expressions of decades of struggle, the painful loss of his first wife, his hope for a new China, and his ultimate victory over the Nationalist forces. Willis Barnstone's introduction, his short biography of Mao and brief history of the revolution, and his notes on Chinese versification all combine to enrich the Western reader's understanding of Mao's poetry.
Reviews: 4
invincible
There are two questions you are probably asking yourself in considering whether or not to purchase this book: a) is Mao Zedong as accomplished a poet as legend has made him out to be, and b) are these accurate and faithful translations of his work. The answers, in my opinion, are a) not really, and b) not really.

As to the first, I am no expert on poetry, and certainly no expert on Chinese poetry, which has a completely different flavor than poetry in English, and I'll admit that Mao does have a gift for phrasing and a depth of perception that make him a much more complex character than most people in the West would ever give him credit for. But that said, my sense is, after translating these for myself from the original Chinese, that these verses are not any better than many other gifted but not great poets who never see the light of publication. What you would be purchasing would not be a volume of great poems, but a volume of poems by Chairman Mao.

As to the second, I should first point out that translating Chinese into English is difficult enough, and translating Chinese poetry into English poetry is many magnitudes more difficult. And it is not that this translator is that far off the mark. Certainly there were any number of occasions when I was glad to have his English version to keep me on track. But in my opinion he too often misreads the tone of what Mao has written. To me, Mao's poems have an edginess and at times even uncertainty about them that the translator glosses over and softens into a sort of happy camper revolutionary portrayal reminiscent of the late '60s (when in fact he actually translated these).

To give a few examples: In the poem Huichang, there is a phrase that the translator gives us as:"Our soldiers point and look eagerly south to Guangdong." The Chinese characters literally translated read: "soldiers point look south Yue." Nowhere do I see in this line or the line preceding or following any character to even imply "eagerly." Perhaps they did look eagerly, but there are also many other emotions they could have looked with, even some complex and contradictory ones, and as Mao does not specify, why should the translator assume?

In the poem Three Songs there is a line he translates as: "I whip my quick horse and don't dismount/ and look back in wonder." The character "jing" that he translates as wonder more properly carries the implication of being startled or frightened. To me there is a big difference between looking back in wonder (again that happy camper feeling) and looking back in shock or awe. Later in the poem there is a line that he translates as: "The sky would fall/ but for the columns of mountains." The character "yu" which he translates as "would" more properly carries the implication of wishing, or desiring, or being on the verge of. Again, I see a big difference between "wishes to" fall and "would" fall. It's the difference between being active and passive. And especially in this case, where the sky might be wishing to fall right on the heads of the soldiers crossing the pass.

There are many more examples like this, but I think this is enough to give you the picture. Be advised.
Molace
Masterful translation.
Hunaya
This is an odd little book. It begins with a brief biography of Mao, tracing the arc of his life. But the center of it is his poetry. I am no expert on Mao's poetry, but the editor of this volume observes (Page 21): "It is unexpected, however, that [Mao] is a major poet." And that is what makes this old work intriguing to me. There are many aspects of Mao--from revolutionary to taker of so many lives. But poet was not a role I had considered until I ran across this work decades ago.

Some quick selections from some of the poems.

"Warlords"

Wind and clouds suddently rip the sky
and warlords clash.
War again.
Rancor rains down on men who dream of a Pillow
of Yellow Barley. . . .

"Swimming"

After swallowing some water at Changsha
I taste a Wuchang fish in the surf
and swim across the Yangtze River that winds
ten thousand li.
I see the entire Chu sky.
Wind batters me, waves hit me--I don't care. . . ."

Some illustrations. . . .

Anyhow, if interested in Mao's poetry, this is an accessible work.
Ueledavi
There are official translations of the Poetry of Mao Zedong but this is the best English translation. Willis Barnstone preserves the touching simplicity and vivid imagery of the poems and his introduction and notes on the poems provide the historical context in a way that is colorful and concise. The poems are printed in both English and Chinese.