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ISBN:0230343643
Author: G. Lynall
ISBN13: 978-0230343641
Title: Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730
Format: mobi lrf lrf azw
ePUB size: 1197 kb
FB2 size: 1856 kb
DJVU size: 1544 kb
Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2012 edition (May 22, 2012)
Pages: 209

Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 by G. Lynall



This book is printed on paper suitable for recycling and made from fully managed and sustained forest sources. Logging, pulping and manufacturing processes are expected to conform to the environmental regulations of the country of origin. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12. ISBN 978-1-349-34473-4.

Lynall's study traces the theological, political, and socio-cultural resonances of scientific knowledge in the early eighteenth century, and considers what they can reveal about the growth of Swift's imagination. for a Birthday Song'. Personal Name: Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745 Knowledge Science

Sinking the ‘Spider’s Cittadel’: The Battel of the Books and Thomas Burnet’s ‘Philosophical Romance’ of the Earth. It is thought that Swift was opposed to the new science that heralded the beginning of the modern age, but this book interrogates that assumption, tracing the theological, political, and socio-cultural resonances of scientific knowledge in the early eighteenth century, and considering what they can reveal about Swift's imagination. Authors and affiliations.

Swift and Science : The Satire, Politics, and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Swift and Science : The Satire, Politics, and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. Qty

Gregory Lynall, Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics, and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012), xii + 209 pp. Hb £5. 0 ISBN 9780230343641. In Lynall’s own words, the book ‘examines the ways in which Jonathan Swift, writing at this time of great transition, engaged with developments in knowledge of the external observable world, and with the culture of scientific discovery and practice, including the textual transmission of ideas’ (p. 1). If this seems a large endeavour, it becomes even more ambitious when, as Lynall goes. But the depth of knowledge and precision in interpretation shown in the Newton sections are matched across the whole book. Lynall chooses, sensibly, to organise the vast range of material at his disposal in clusters around a single individual.

The British Journal for the History of Science. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 by Gregory Lynall. Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 by Gregory Lynall (pp. 165-166).

Furthermore, one of Swift’s purposes for inventing the knowledge engine was to satirize the scientific and technical cultures that now claim it as part of their history. As one piece of the elaborate discursive and material code of Gulliver’s Travels, the knowledge engine, its sources, and its reception offer some unique insights into the relationships that exist amongst factual and fictional narratives, scientific and humanistic discourse, words and images, and print and digital technologies. Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics, and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690–1730. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Swift was a High Church Anglican and Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. Lynall showed that if the knowledge or authority of experimental philosophy were used in backing it, that too should be called out. A key episode was where Newton presented evidence to back William Wood's application for a valuable contract to make new coinage for Ireland. Corruption and bribery – including involvement of the King's mistress – were widely rumoured, as was the claim that the coins were of inferior quality.

It is thought that Swift was opposed to the new science that heralded the beginning of the modern age, but this book interrogates that assumption, tracing the theological, political, and socio-cultural resonances of scientific knowledge in the early eighteenth century, and considering what they can reveal about Swift's imagination.