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ISBN:0807858536
Author: Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan
ISBN13: 978-0807858530
Title: Men of Letters in the Early Republic: Cultivating Forums of Citizenship (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press)
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (March 3, 2008)
Pages: 254

Men of Letters in the Early Republic: Cultivating Forums of Citizenship (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press) by Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan



The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture is sponsored jointly by the College of William and Mary and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan. In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, after decades of intense upheaval and debate, the role of the citizen was seen as largely political.

Published by: Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, University of North Carolina Press. 5149/9780807838808 kaplan. In September 1795, New York City was suffering through one of the terrible yellow fever epidemics that afflicted American seaports during the decade. Many residents fled to safer ground, and those who remained anxiously tried to avoid contracting a disease whose method of transmission was a terrifying mystery.

Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press. Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan is assistant professor of history at Arizona State University. For more information about Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan, visit the Author Page. Forces us to move beyond a national framework and to foreground the local and regional networks at work in the post-Revolutionary er. -Common-Place

Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan. Published by: The University of North Carolina Press. Series: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia. Imagining a different kind of citizenship, they founded periodicals, circulated manuscripts, and conversed about poetry, art, and the nature of man. They pondered William Godwin and Edmund Burke more carefully than they did candidates for local elections and insisted other Americans should do so as well

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008. For these individuals, politics alone was not sufficient to fulfill America’s promise.

22 Items by the Organization Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. American curiosity : cultures of natural history in the colonial British Atlantic world, Susan Scott Parrish. Borrow it. At the crossroads : Indians and empires on a mid-Atlantic frontier, 1700-1763, Jane T. Merritt. Men of letters in the early republic : cultivating forums of citizenship, Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan. Prodigal daughters : Susanna Rowson's early American women, Marion Rust.

by Catherine O'Donnell, (Historian); Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. Type: Print book : State or province government publication. Publisher: Chapel Hill, . Public Lists that Include "Men of letters in the early republic : cultivating forums of citizenship". First Prev 1 Next Last.

But as Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan reveals, some Americans saw a need for a realm of public men outside politics. They believed that neither the nation nor they themselves could achieve virtue and happiness through politics alone. Through these groups, Kaplan demonstrates, an enduring and influential model of the man of letters emerged in the first decade of the nineteenth century. Forums (Discussion and debate)-United States-History. Political Culture-United States-History. Publishers and publishing-United States-History. ISBN13:9780807858530.

Catherine O’Donnell Kaplan. Men of Letters in the Early Republic: Cultivating Forums of Citizenship. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008. viii+245 p. 5 illustrations, notes, index.

In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, after decades of intense upheaval and debate, the role of the citizen was seen as largely political. But as Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan reveals, some Americans saw a need for a realm of public men outside politics. They believed that neither the nation nor they themselves could achieve virtue and happiness through politics alone. Imagining a different kind of citizenship, they founded periodicals, circulated manuscripts, and conversed about poetry, art, and the nature of man. They pondered William Godwin and Edmund Burke more carefully than they did candidates for local elections and insisted other Americans should do so as well. Kaplan looks at three groups in particular: the Friendly Club in New York City, which revolved around Elihu Hubbard Smith, with collaborators such as William Dunlap and Charles Brockden Brown; the circle around Joseph Dennie, editor of two highly successful periodicals; and the Anthologists of the Boston Athenaeum. Through these groups, Kaplan demonstrates, an enduring and influential model of the man of letters emerged in the first decade of the nineteenth century.