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ISBN:0813917727
Author: Barbara Leah Harman
ISBN13: 978-0813917726
Title: The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England (Victorian Literature and Culture)
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ePUB size: 1704 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (March 30, 1998)
Pages: 244

The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England (Victorian Literature and Culture) by Barbara Leah Harman



The Victorian Era England facts about Queen Victoria, Society & Literature. Characteristics of Victorian poetry. Common themes in Victorian Literature. Influence of Victorian Literature. Famous Victorian novelists and poets. Characteristics of Victorian novels. Victorian novels tend to be idealized portraits of difficult lives in which hard work, perseverance, love and luck win out in the end. They were usually inclined towards being of improving nature with a central moral lesson at heart. The reclaiming of the past was a major part of Victorian literature and was to be found in both classical literature and also the medieval literature of England. The Victorians loved the heroic, chivalrous stories of knights of old and they hoped to regain some of that noble, courtly behaviour and impress it upon the people both at home and in the wider empire.

In this groundbreaking book, Barbara Leah Harman convincingly establishes a new category in Victorian fiction: the feminine political novel. By studying Victorian female protagonists who participate in the public universe conventionally occupied by men, she is able to reassess the public realm as the site of noble and meaningful action for women in Victorian England. Library descriptions. Interested in this topic?

Harman, Barbara Leah. The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 1998. Women and Domestic Experience in Victorian Political Fiction. Westport: Greenwood, 2001. Knoepflmacher, U. eligious Humanism and the Victorian Novel: George Eliot, Walter Pater, and Samuel Butler. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1965. Determinism and Responsibility in the Works of George Eliot. PMLA 7. (June 1962): 268–79. Lewes, G. he Life of Maximilien Robespierre; with Extracts from His Unpublished Correspondence.

In this book, Barbara Leah Harman convincingly establishes a new category in Victorian fiction: the feminine political novel. By studying Victorian female protagonists who participate in the public universe conventionally occupied by men - the world of mills and city streets, of political activism and labor strikes, of public speaking and parliamentary debates - she is abl In this book, Barbara Leah Harman convincingly establishes a new category in Victorian fiction: the feminine political novel

Ruth Bernard Yeazell, "The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England. Barbara Leah Harman," Modern Philology 98, no. 3 (Fe. 2001): 523-525.

On portraits in the Victorian novel, mimesis and caricature, Lacanian theory and characterization. Each chapter in this book addresses a separate aspect of the production and distribution of literature, whether biographical or fictional, with the aim of showing the central role in which Shakespeare played in Victorian thought. The investment of these Victorians contributes to the anxieties that they experienced when Shakespeare’s authorship was called into question at the end of the century.

The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England, Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998. Solitary Travelers: Nineteenth-Century Women’s Travel Narratives and the Scientific Vocation, Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London, Cranbury: Associated University Presses, 2001. The Forgotten Female Aesthete: Literature and Culture in Late-Victorian England. Schaffer, Talia and Kathy Alexis Psomiades, ed. Women and British Aestheticism, Charlottesville, London: University Press of Virginia, 2000. Thaden, Barbara Z. The Maternal Voice in Victorian Fiction: Rewriting the Patriarchal Family.

26 The Victorian Novel in Film and on Television Joss Marsh and Kamilla Elliott. Jonathan Rose is Professor of History and convenor of the graduate program in Book History at Drew University.

In this groundbreaking book, Barbara Leah Harman convincingly establishes a new category in Victorian fiction: the feminine political novel. By studying Victorian female protagonists who participate in the public universe conventionally occupied by men, she is able to reassess the public realm as the site of noble and meaningful action for women in Victorian England.