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ISBN:0312124112
Author: Joan Ozark Holmer
ISBN13: 978-0312124113
Title: The Merchant of Venice: Choice, Hazard and Consequence
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ePUB size: 1709 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Palgrave; 1995 edition (February 15, 1995)
Pages: 392

The Merchant of Venice: Choice, Hazard and Consequence by Joan Ozark Holmer



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Choice, Hazard and Consequence. Chapters Table of contents (6 chapters). About About this book. PDF. ‘Truth will come to light’: The Historical Prism. Pages 44. ‘Give and hazard’: Friends and Lovers. The Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare's most frequently performed and currently most controversial comedy, continues to confront in its stage and critical history the ongoing debate over its artistic unity.

Discovering a tightly knit interplay of contrarieties and correspondences, she argues for the play's unity of dramatic design through its enactment of choices for or against a complex conception of wise love. Historical contexts - aesthetic, theological, and economic - anchor the play's problems of finance and faith that make or break a variety of secular and spiritual bonds.

Description: Bryan . world-literature/?page 72. New York: St. Martin's P, 1995. ISBN 0 312 12411 2 Cloth.

Cover/Number of pages: Paperback, 392 pages. Publication: Published February 8th 1995 by Palgrave.

Shakespeare’s Sources for Merchant of Venice. Auden compares mercantile Venetian society in The Merchant of Venice to the feudal societies portrayed in Shakespeare’s medieval history plays, examining how the different economic systems create different value systems in the worlds of the plays. He gives a history of usury and analyzes the contrast between idyllic Belmont and mercantile Venice in The Merchant of Venice. Shylock: A Legend and Its Legacy. The essays examine The Merchant of Venice through the lenses of modern literary and cultural theories such as feminism and post-colonialism. The texts cover a wide variety of concepts ranging from anti-Semitism, to Christopher Marlowe, to the play’s historical stagings. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.

Twisted Tales from Shakespeare. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1957. Auden, W. H. Brothers & Others. In The Dyer’s Hand and Other Essays, 218–237. New York: Random House, 1962. Barnet, Sylvan, ed. Twentieth Century Interpretations of The Merchant of Venice: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1970. Granville-Barker, Harley. The Merchant of Venice: Choice, Hazard, and Consequence. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Macmillan, 1995.

The Merchant of Venice was probably written in either 1596 or 1597, after Shakespeare had written such plays as Romeo and Juliet and Richard III, but before he penned the great tragedies of his later years. Its basic plot outline, with the characters of the merchant, the poor suitor, the fair lady, and the villainous Jew, is found in a number of contemporary Italian story collections, and Shakespeare borrowed several details, such the choice of caskets that Portia inflicts on all her suitors, from pre-existing sources  .

The Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare's most frequently performed and currently most controversial comedy, continues to confront in its stage and critical history the ongoing debate over its artistic unity. Six chapters explore the degree of dramatic integrity Shakespeare achieves by unifying the play's many hard choices through a tightly-knit interplay of contrarieties and correspondences in structure, language, characters and ideas. Engaging the play's extensive body of criticism, this book contextualizes the most provocative questions raised by the play and provides considerable new evidence about Shakespeare's possible sources and his innovative use of them, especially usury and merchantry, Jew and Christian, biblical and classical allusion, stage law and verbal-visual symbols.