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ISBN:0773485899
Author: Hugh C. Parker
ISBN13: 978-0773485891
Title: Greek Gods in Italy in Ovid's Fasti: A Greater Greece (Studies in Classics, Vol 5) (English and Latin Edition)
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Language: English Latin
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Edwin Mellen Pr (September 1, 1997)
Pages: 173

Greek Gods in Italy in Ovid's Fasti: A Greater Greece (Studies in Classics, Vol 5) (English and Latin Edition) by Hugh C. Parker



A Greater Greece, (Studies in Classics, 5) by Hugh C. Parker.

Title: Studies in classics ; v. 5. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -160) and indexes. Personal Name: Ovid, 43 . Geographic Name: Greece Religion. Rubrics: Religious poetry, Latin History and criticism Didactic poetry, Latin Latin poetry Greek influences Gods, Greek, in literature.

Exclusive Licence to Publish: The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies. Recommend this journal.

ISBN 13: 9780773485891. Publication Date: 9/1/1997.

Greek Gods in Italy in Ovid's Fasti: A Greater Greece by H. C. Parker (p. 241). A Discourse of Wonders: Audience and Performance in Ovid's Metamorphoses by S. M. Wheeler. Wheeler (p. 242).

Greek in Italy - Project Members. Interamna Lirenas Overview. Ovid’s fifteen-book unbroken narrative of myth and history unfolds an alternative story of the world from the beginnings of the cosmos to the age of Augustus, binding together its fluidly generated tales according to the overriding principles of instability and change. Ovid is one of the first and most acute readers of Virgilian epic, whether through the tales of destruction and contingency that challenge the idea of the eternal city and the destined regime or through the fantastical transformations and bizarre love stories that eclipse or sideline global events. 36-53 M. Griffith, Greek Satyr Play. Five Studies, Berkeley 2015. and on Euripides generally. D. Mastronarde, The Art of Euripides, Cambridge 2010.

Nandini Pandey - "Ovid's Empire of the Imagination: Fictionality, Reader Response, and the Power of Public Image in Augustan Rome" - Advised by K. McCarthy. Daniel Walin - "Slaves and Slave Characters in Aristophanic Comedy" - Advised by M. Griffith. University of California, Irvine, Riverside, San Diego. Emily A. Kratzer - "The Double Herakles: Studies on the Death and Deification of the Hero in Fifth-Century Drama" - Advised by K. Morgan and J. Papadopoulos. University of Florida. Andrew Alwine - "The Rhetoric and Conceptualization of Enmity in Classical Athens" - Advised by A. Wolpert. Nathalie Sado Nisinson - "Greek Heroes, Roman Rituals: Cult and Culture Class in Ovid's Heroides" - Advised by David Levene. Melanie Subacus - "Political Cosmopolitanism at Rome" - Advised by Joy Connolly.

July 18, 2018 R. Joy Littlewood. Author: R. Joy Littlewood Publisher: OUP Oxford ISBN: 0191569208 Category: Literary Criticism Page: 348 View: 8376. After a period of neglect, Ovid's elegiac poem on the Roman calendar has been the focus of much recent scholarship.

This monograph deals with Ovid's treatments of the gods in the poem, and in particular with gods who emigrate from Greece to Italy and become part of Roman religion as the poem progresses. The text offers a new reading of the poem which focuses on four figures from Greek mythology - Saturn, Ino, Faunus and Hercules. All four come to Italy during the course of the poem, and Ovid shows how each one sheds his or her Greek past to become a figure of genuine religious significance to the Roman people. These transformations suggest that the "Fasti" is meant to be read as "ab encomium" of Roman religion, or so this text argues.