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ISBN:0802043658
Author: Dawn Thompson
ISBN13: 978-0802043658
Title: Writing a Politics of Perception: Memory, Holography, and Women Writers in Canada
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ePUB size: 1546 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1 edition (May 19, 2000)
Pages: 152

Writing a Politics of Perception: Memory, Holography, and Women Writers in Canada by Dawn Thompson



Classification Numbers Assigned in Canada: PS8089. Classification Numbers Assigned in Canada: PS8089. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: C813/. 5409/9287 21. Personal Name: Thompson, Dawn. Publication, Distribution, et. Toronto. University of Toronto Press, (c)2000. Physical Description: viii, 143 p. ;, 24 cm.

Writing a Politics of Perception contributes to an emerging body of interdisciplinary studies focusing on the relationship between the physical sciences and humanities. In particular, Thompson takes a critical look at the relationship between new technologies of simulation such as holography and contemporary theories of representation. Reading work by Nicole Brossard, Margaret Atwood, Marlene Nourbese Philip, Beatrice Culleton, and Régine Robin, Thompson explores and tests her theory of holographic memory

Writing a Politics of Percepti book. Writing a Politics of Perception offers new approaches to five novels by women writing in Canada. Dawn Thompson analyses these works through an epistemological theory that shifts critical perspective in surprising ways. Under consideration are two classics of Canadian literature, Nicole Brossard's "Picture Theory" and Margaret Atwood's "Surfacing," as well as three lesser-k Writing a Politics of Perception offers new approaches to five novels by women writing in Canada.

Writing a Politics of Perception offers new approaches to five novels by women writing in Canada.

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Looking at five novels by women writing in Canada, Thompson develops a theory of ?holographic memory,? in which texts are performances that invite constant revi. 5 The wandering memory of Régine Robinʼs La Québécoite.

Writing a politics of perception. memory, holography and women writers in Canada. Published 2000 by University of Toronto Press in Toronto. Includes bibliographical references (p. -139) and index. viii, 143 p. ; Number of pages.

Find nearly any book by Dawn Thompson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Writing a Politics of Perception: Memory, Holography, and Women Writers in Canada: ISBN 9780802043658 (978-0-8020-4365-8) Hardcover, University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division, 2000. El lobo de Ravencliff.

Currently, she is writing a book entitled Forgotten: Age-Related Dementia and Alzheimer’s in Canadian Literature. Dr. Marlene Goldman was awarded the Canadian National Institute for the Blind's Barbara Tuck-MacPhee Award in 2018. Writing a Politics of Perception: Memory, Holography, and Women Writers in Canada by D. Thompson. University of Toronto Quarterly’s ‘Letters in Canada 2000,’ 7. (Winter 2000-01): 392-93. Timothy Findley and the Aesthetics of Fascism by Anne Geddes Baily.

Writing a Politics of Perception offers new approaches to five novels by women writing in Canada. Dawn Thompson analyses these works through an epistemological theory that shifts critical perspective in surprising ways.

Under consideration are two classics of Canadian literature, Nicole Brossard's "Picture Theory" and Margaret Atwood's "Surfacing", as well as three lesser-known works: Marlene Nourbese Phillip's "Looking for Livingstone", Beatrice Culleton's "In Search of April Raintree", and Régine Robin's "La Québécoite". Thompson develops a theory of 'holographic memory,' in which texts are performances that invite constant revision, remodelling, and interaction between narrative, memory, and, potentially, reality. This theory is informed by de Lauretis's semiotics of subjectivity, Derrida's memoire radicale, and physicist David Bohm's theory of holographic quantum reality.

Reading these works of Canadian literature through a theory of holographic memory, Thompson successfully combines literary and cultural studies without sacrificing one to the other. She adds to and creates an alliance between feminist, post-colonial, and marxist theory, furthering political work in each of these areas. The interdisciplinary nature of Writing a Politics of Perception will attract scholars and students in a variety of fields, including Canadian and Québec literature, comparative literature, women's studies, cultural studies, philosophy, and the social sciences.