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ISBN:0195074246
Author: Lewis Glinert
ISBN13: 978-0195074246
Title: The Joys of Hebrew
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ePUB size: 1138 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 19, 1992)
Pages: 304

The Joys of Hebrew by Lewis Glinert



and colorful slices of modern Israeli life. In addition, Glinert provides at the back of the book an alphabetical list of familiar biblical names in English, Sephardi/Israeli Hebrew, and Ashkenazi Hebrew. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Indigo Alibris Better World Books IndieBound.

Glinert (Hebrew and Jewish studies, Univ. of London) has brought together a collection of more than 600 entries on "the best known and most lovable Hebrew words and sayings. Although the style is light-hearted, the author knows his subject. The arrangement is alphabetical according to an excellent transliteration. Entries range from the familiar Bar Mitzvah and chutzpah to rachmanut ("compassion") and tsarr gidul banim ("the stress of raising children"). The Joys of Hebrew will disappoint those familiar with Rosten's book. In part, it is because spoken Hebrew has not yet developed the expressiveness of Yiddish and also little of colloquial Hebrew is known or used within the English speaking Jewish community. More important, Glinert's writing style cannot compare to Rosten's and his book suffers in comparison.

Publication date 1993. Publisher Oxford University Press. Collection printdisabled; inlibrary; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation. Contributor Internet Archive. Daisy Books for the Print Disabled. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 28, 2014. 35 35. Join Waitlist.

Lewis Glinert provides a concise definition of each entry, and then illustrates the word's usage with generous passages from the Bible and the Talmud, the prayers and the sayings of famous rabbis, the razor's edge of Jewish humor, excerpts from the work of Elie Wiesel, Adin Steinsaltz, . Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Recently Viewed and Featured. Ed466 642 - Benchmarking and Alignment of Standards and Testing, Cse Technical Report. many words familiar from their use in Israel, such as rega (literally, "one moment," it is the Israeli equivalent of Mexico's mañana) or miluim (army reserve service); and many traditional sayings, such as Tsarat rabim chatsi nechama ("A public woe is half a comfort").

Personal Name: Glinert, Lewis. Publication, Distribution, et. New York ; Toronto On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The joys of Hebrew, Lewis Glinert.

Preserved by the Jews across two millennia, Hebrew endured long after it ceased to be a mother tongue, resulting in one of the most intense textual cultures ever known. It was a bridge to Greek and Arab science. It unlocked the biblical sources for Jerome and the Reformation.

Lewis Glinert is Lecturer in Hebrew and Jewish Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. 5 14% (1). 4 57% (4). 3 29% (2).

When do you say mazal tov? What is the English equivalent to the Talmudic expression Alya ve-kots ba ("a sheep's tail with a thorn in it")? What is a get, a golem, a kibbutz, a chalutz? What four plant species are waved during prayers on the harvest festival of Sukkot? You'll find answers to these questions and hundreds of others--all in clear English--in this remarkable collection of the best known, most loved Hebrew words and phrases in the English speaking world. From Acharon to Zohar, this informative and often humorous dictionary features over six hundred Hebrew words and expressions arranged in alphabetical order (the Roman alphabet is used throughout, as well as Hebrew head words). The first such guide to Hebrew, this volume is more than a mere lexicon--it is a jubilant celebration of Hebrew itself, a treasure trove of Jewish wit, wisdom, culture, and tradition. Lewis Glinert provides a concise definition of each entry, and then illustrates the word's usage with generous passages from the Bible and the Talmud, the prayers and the sayings of famous rabbis, the razor's edge of Jewish humor, excerpts from the work of Elie Wiesel, Adin Steinsaltz, S.Y. Agnon, Martin Buber, Naomi Shemer and other contemporary writers, folklore from all over the Jewish world, and colorful slices of modern Israeli life. There are words directly related to the practice of religion, such as amida (a prayer said standing, under one's breath, essentially a cry for help--for wisdom, health, peace, prosperity, and so forth) as well as the names of all the Jewish holy days and religious customs; words from everyday Jewish experience, such peot (the long sidecurls customarily worn by the Chasidim); many words familiar from their use in Israel, such as rega (literally, "one moment," it is the Israeli equivalent of Mexico's mañana) or miluim (army reserve service); and many traditional sayings, such as Tsarat rabim chatsi nechama ("A public woe is half a comfort"). In addition, Glinert provides at the back of the book an alphabetical list of familiar biblical names in English, Sephardi/Israeli Hebrew, and Ashkenazi Hebrew. This celebration of Hebrew language and culture is a joy to read and to use. Everyone from Bible students to collectors of Judaica, from Woody Allen fans to people planning a journey to the Holy Land, will be delighted by this informative volume.
Reviews: 5
IWantYou
Great book and it was delivered nicely
Fountain_tenderness
Love it
Nahn
Although this book doesn't exactly give the beginner all the esentials of word(s) origin, it does though, give any reader a fresh insight of meaning and usage. Lewis Glinert is well known author of many Hebrew language texts and a well respected intructor of the Hebrew language from various colleges and universities. The selection of words are well chosen(dictionary style), some biblical, and some just plain everyday words. A nice addition to the list is the Yiddish translation(s), and plus a list of some biblical names with its translations in the back. This is great book for travellers(for those long air flights to and from). Educators, like myself can utilize this book at anytime or place, especially stumped by the curiosities of colleagues and students. The only reason that I gave it a 9 out of 10, is that, there seems to be no evidence of a second book on its way. Well at least get this one! Shlomo Arad
Rolling Flipper
Why would anyone speak of a "joys" of a language or dialect? Does anyone ever speak of the "joys" of Esperanto or Japanese or English?
Hebrew is but a Canaanite variation, one of a variety of language patterns with a basic vocabulary of some 5,000 words which King James and his people rather expanded. They had to stretch the Hebrew vocabulary by giving terms many more meanings than the original users could have possibly had available! Please keep in mind a reader of today's New York Times may have a vocabulary of 80,000 or more words.

Using such terms as "joys" speaks NOT of scholarship but of promotion of divine origins and religious mysticism.
Perdana
For those who expect a book along the lines of the Joys of Yiddish, you will be disappointed. Leo Rosten had an extraordinary ability to combine humor and scholarship in his book. He also benefitted from the fact that many Yiddish words are used widely among English speaking Jews and a good deal of them have found their way into the wider English speaking world. The Joys of Hebrew will disappoint those familiar with Rosten's book. In part, it is because spoken Hebrew has not yet developed the expressiveness of Yiddish and also little of colloquial Hebrew is known or used within the English speaking Jewish community. More important, Glinert's writing style cannot compare to Rosten's and his book suffers in comparison. The Joys of Hebrew will be useful to individuals looking to expand their understanding of the language but will have limited appeal to others.