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ISBN:0231118953
Author: Judith Butler
ISBN13: 978-0231118958
Title: Antigone's Claim
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ePUB size: 1257 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Columbia University Press (March 15, 2002)
Pages: 118

Antigone's Claim by Judith Butler



Butler argues that Antigone represents a form of feminist and sexual agency that is fraught with risk. Moreover, Antigone shows how the constraints of normative kinship unfairly decide what will and will not be a livable life. Butler explores the meaning of Antigone, wondering what forms of kinship might have allowed her to live. Along the way, she considers the works of such philosophers as Hegel, Lacan, and Irigaray.

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Butler argues that Antigone represents a form of feminis. nd sexual agency that is fraught with risk. p. cm. - (The Wellek Library lectures) Includes bibliographical references and index.

Temporarily out of stock. Antigone's Claim is a work of intricate and detailed analysis of enormously difficult material a newfound theoretical activism within the political domain. Maria Cimitile Hypatia). Brief but powerful and provocative nook. This book is about the c legacy of the figure of Antigone and the political and philosophical implications of her performative resistance to state power.

Book Antigone's claim : kinship between life and death Judith Butler. Book's title: Antigone's claim : kinship between life and death Judith Butler. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0231504411 (electronic b. System Control Number

Antigone’s Claim: Kinship between Life & Death. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. PLEASE READ IN ENTIRETY (pp. 1-82. Butler's Claim (or one of them): Does It Hold Up? This will be an exercise in critical thinking. This is not always an easy book, especially in chapters 1 and 2; I might recommend starting with pages 69-72 for a straightforward statement of the issues on the social and political plane. As for Butler's style of exposition, it often moves from the abstract to the concrete - read on beyond that difficult paragraph or sentence, and you'll find that it all begins to fall into place. Beyond that, I leave it up to you to piece together the argument and to consider it in relation to the primary text, Sophocles' Antigone, providing the original impetus for her study.

Antigone's Claim Unwritten Laws, Aberrant Transmissions Promiscuous Obedience. Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley. Her many acclaimed critical works include Subjects of Desire, Gender Trouble, The Psychic Life of Power, and Bodies That Matter. Gender and Sexuality Studies. Literary Theory and Criticism.

Antigone's Claim- Judith Butler - Download as PDF File . df) or view presentation slides online. Judith Butler y sus ensayos acerca del rol de la mujer Judith Butler's essays on the rol of women through history. Antigone& Claim- Judith Butler.

Author(s) : Judith Butler. Publisher : Columbia . This work argues that Antigone, the renowned insurgent from Sophocles's "Oedipus" and feminist icon, represents a form of sexual and feminist legacy that is fraught with risk.

The celebrated author of Gender Trouble here redefines Antigone's legacy, recovering her revolutionary significance and liberating it for a progressive feminism and sexual politics. Butler's new interpretation does nothing less than reconceptualize the incest taboo in relation to kinship―and open up the concept of kinship to cultural change.Antigone, the renowned insurgent from Sophocles's Oedipus, has long been a feminist icon of defiance. But what has remained unclear is whether she escapes from the forms of power that she opposes. Antigone proves to be a more ambivalent figure for feminism than has been acknowledged, since the form of defiance she exemplifies also leads to her death. Butler argues that Antigone represents a form of feminist and sexual agency that is fraught with risk. Moreover, Antigone shows how the constraints of normative kinship unfairly decide what will and will not be a livable life.Butler explores the meaning of Antigone, wondering what forms of kinship might have allowed her to live. Along the way, she considers the works of such philosophers as Hegel, Lacan, and Irigaray. How, she asks, would psychoanalysis have been different if it had taken Antigone―the "postoedipal" subject―rather than Oedipus as its point of departure? If the incest taboo is reconceived so that it does not mandate heterosexuality as its solution, what forms of sexual alliance and new kinship might be acknowledged as a result? The book relates the courageous deeds of Antigone to the claims made by those whose relations are still not honored as those of proper kinship, showing how a culture of normative heterosexuality obstructs our capacity to see what sexual freedom and political agency could be.
Reviews: 5
DarK-LiGht
I haven't finished this extremely short text yet. It was originally a small series of lectures. Basically, Butler critiques Hegel's and Lacan's appropriations of Antigone (both the play and, especially, the character) to represent a certain ideal. She summarizes rather lucidly both Hegel's and Lacan's positions. Of course, the problem with both Hegel and Lacan is that they are so dense and (often) obscure that, like Nietzsche, they get appropriated left and right themselves. So understanding what they *really* ever meant is always slippery. But Hegel and Lacan are familiar territory for Butler. She's no Classicist, and she's upfront about that. I think she does a phenomenal job highlighting the ultimately untenable postion(s) Hegel and, to a lesser extent, Lacan assume in relation to Antigone. I haven't finish yet, but Butler is certainly setting up her own "feminist" reading. It's not concerned with "what the Greeks thought" the way classical scholars (by definition) often are. Rather, she's clearly relating Greek tragedy to the modern world in response to the past 300 years of (post)enlightenment thinking. A more recent text that also deals with a lot of this material is The Antigone Complex by Cecilia Sjoholm - if you're interested.
Tegore
To get it out of the way early, this is just barely a book about Sophocles' Antigone. I don't say this as a criticism by the way, but simply as a matter of setting expectations. As for what it -is- about, well, it's pretty classic Butler: take a bunch of social and political distinctions (between, say, the public and the private, life and death, family and society), show how unstable they are - the ways in which they bleed into one another, cross over at unexpected points, and muddle otherwise taken-for-granted lines of 'intelligibility' - and ground a hope for a more emancipatory and radical social order upon the wreckage wrought. Seen from a distance, it's a pretty straightforward project, and Antigone here serves as nothing less than the springboard from which to articulate it. Such are the stakes of Butler's reading of the play then, which continually attends to the 'transgressions', 'scandals', and defiances of the norm which litter the text, all the better to bring out its emancipatory potential.

Yet while Antigone (the play), serves as the book's protagonist, it's the critique of its antagonists that lends the book most of it's already-slim heft (just over 80 pages without notes). Hence alongside the reading of the play itself is Butler's engagement with both Hegel and Lacan, whose own readings of Antigone are taken to exemplify attempts to 'contain' and otherwise check the transgressive currents that Butler so carefully divines. Against Hegel then, will Butler reject the attempt to fix the distinction between the state and the family, while against Lacan is emphasised the unstable boundaries between the 'Symbolic' and the social, distinctions which, in Butler's reading, underpin approaches to not just the play, but to our wider understanding of social and political categories more generally. If it sounds like there's alot packed in to this little book, it's because there is, and if there's any difficulty in reading here, it's as much to do with the condensed presentation of argument than with anything else.

That all said, this book has left me somewhat torn. On the one hand, I can't help but appreciate the 'expansion' of Butler's thought from categories of gender (so central to her early work) to categories of social relations - specifically kinship relations - more generally. I've undoubtably come away from this thinking more critically and more expansively about the kinds of kinship relations that we so easily take for granted in this day and age. On the other hand, did we really need another reading of Antigone to get there? I mean, at my most critical, this felt like a footnote in the form of a book, developing ideas that really demanded more than the simple literary analysis offered within (even in a book of philosophy, is there really nothing to say of the sociology, history or economics of the family form? Really?). So yeah, a book of interesting ideas let down by the minimal effort made to pursue them - a disappointment not in spite of, but because of it's allure.
Gagas
Antigone's revolt lives on! As Butler says herself in the introduction, she is not a classicist and has no desire to be one. This book is about the intellectual/artistic legacy of the figure of Antigone and the political and philosophical implications of her performative resistance to state power. Having taken a seminar in 1998 with Butler on the very topic of Antigone, I can assure you that the author is well aware of the ambiguity of Sophocles's play. As Butler demonstrates, this ambiguity is what has driven so many diverse interpretations by major thinkers such as Hegel and Lacan and playwrights like Hoelderlin and Brecht. Butler insightfully analyzes the critical-artistic tradition that has developed since Sophocles and helps to demonstrate this tradition's continued relevance in the present day--in any case where individual desire conflicts with the institution of the state as it functions to set the parameters of the normal or acceptable in society.
Morlunn
Judith Butler's study of Antigone, over the course of these 3 lectures, yields important and timely insights about how we might understand kinship and love in today's society. Her analysis of Hegel, Levi-Strauss, and Lacan is impressively rigorous. A must read for anyone interested in liguistics, structuralism, feminism and contemporary questions about political belonging.