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ISBN:052137250X
Author: John Sturrock
ISBN13: 978-0521372503
Title: Celine: Journey to the End of the Night (Landmarks of World Literature)
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ePUB size: 1901 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (May 25, 1990)
Pages: 111

Celine: Journey to the End of the Night (Landmarks of World Literature) by John Sturrock



In this book Sturrock attempts to place Celine's Journey to the End of the Night in historical context, he gives some biographical details relating to Celine's life, he elucidates the major themes of the novel, and he analyzes the style. Sturrock is quite successful in all of those tasks. dissertation (a biography of Ignaz-Philip Semmelweis). For example, Sturrock highlights the theme of the journey. The journey seems to have two functions. First, the fact that Bardamu travels the world is what allows him to claim universality for his insights into human nature. If Bardamu had remained in France for the whole novel the universality of his insights would have been lost.

This textbook series is ambitious in scope. It provides concise and lucid introductions to major works of world literature from classical antiquity to the twentieth century. It is not confined to any single literary tradition or genre, and will cumulatively form a substantial library of textbooks on some of the most important and widely read literary masterpieces.

Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Céline. This l work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is involved with World War I, colonial Africa, and post–World War I United States (where he works for the Ford Motor Company), returning in the second half of the novel to France, where he becomes a medical doctor and establishes a practice in a poor Paris suburb, the fictional La Garenne-Rancy.

Don Quixote - A. J. Close Celine: Journey to the End of the Night - John Sturrock. Gabriel garcia marquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude MICHAEL WOOD University of Exeter.

LibraryThing members' description.

Journey to the End of the Night (Landmarks of World Literature). Published May 10th 1990 by Cambridge University Press. Paperback, 112 pages.

Celine: Journey to the End of the Night - John Sturrock. Boccaccio: Decameron - David Wallace Wordsworth: The Prelude - Stephen Gill Eliot: Middlemarch - Karen Chase. Hardy: Tess of the d'Urbervilles - Dale Kramer. The Bible - Stephen Prickett and Robert Barnes Flaubert: Madame Bovary - Stephen Heath Baudelaire: Les Fleurs du mal - F. W. Leakey Zola: L yAssommoir - David Baguley Boswell: The Life of Johnson - Greg Clingham Pushkin: Eugene Onegin - . Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man First World War ends E. Pardo Bazan dies. Chronological table of main events in Fortunata and Jacinta 1869.

Home All Categories Journey to the End of the Night (Landmarks of World Literature). ISBN13: 9780521372503. Celine : Journey to the End of the Night. This textbook series is ambitious in scope.

Analysis of Journey to the End of the Night by Celine. The Journey describes the metaphysical wanderings of men condemned to the absurdity of life and human folly. Deeply misanthropic and nihilistic, the thesis of the novel can be summarized as follows: Man has no place of comfort, life, as the metaphor of journey is useless. The episode reflects the African anti-colonialism of Celine. He described a savage domination of the local settlers. He paints the colonial world as a rotten world, plagued by alcoholism and low blows, between settlers and between settlers and natives. The so-called civilization brought by the West is a lie. This criticism is particularly taken up by Sartre in his preface to the Wretched of the Earth has Fanon.

This textbook series is ambitious in scope. It provides concise and lucid introductions to major works of world literature from classical antiquity to the twentieth century. It is not confined to any single literary tradition or genre, and will cumulatively form a substantial library of textbooks on some of the most important and widely read literary masterpieces. Each book is devoted to a single work and provides a close reading of that text, as well as a full account of its historical, cultural, and intellectual background, a discussion of its influence, and a guide to further reading. The contributors to the series, are given complete freedom in the choice of their critical method. Where the text is written in a language other than English, full account is taken of readers studying the text in English translation. While critical jargon is avoided, important technical terminology is fully explained, and thus this series will be genuinely accessible to students at all levels and to general readers. Journey to the End of the Night is a novel of savage, exultant misanthropy, full of cynical humour and of the blackest pessimism in respect of humanity. Its millions of readers across the world have admired it uneasily, dismayed by Celine's morbidity, yet fascinated by his virtuosity as a writer. In this detailed study, John Sturrock shows why that admiration is absolutely in order, and why this extraordinary work should be acknowledged as one of the chief literary landmarks of the twentieth century.
Reviews: 5
Roru
Sturrock is a very good translator, witness his versions of Stendhal's BRULARD and Hugo's NOTRE DAME DE PARIS. so he's more than qualified to write a critical commentary on VOYAGE.

My question is: why write one? I think the existing biographies of Vitoux and McCarthy provide all the background a serious reader needs to make sense of Celine's ouevre, including VOYAGE. It's one of those books that "interprets" itself.

I don't want to say Sturrock's book is superfluous, but a reader of VOYAGE would do better to read Celine's next novel, MORT A CREDIT, and one of the aforementioned biographies to understand why Dr. Destouches was attempting.
Survivors
Don't be stupid like me. This isn't the actual book it's just a book about the book.
Arcanefist
I thought this would include the entire novel and some essays, like a Norton edition. It is a small book with just a few essays, which are OK but not fantastic.
Gajurus
I have been fairly impressed with this Landmarks of World Literature series. I have only read two books in the series so far but they have both been quite good. In this book Sturrock attempts to place Celine's Journey to the End of the Night in historical context, he gives some biographical details relating to Celine's life, he elucidates the major themes of the novel, and he analyzes the style. Sturrock is quite successful in all of those tasks. Sturrock attempts to determine how much of Bardamu's vision of the world was also shared by Celine by comparing passages in Journey to the End of the Night to passages in other Celine works including his Ph.D. dissertation (a biography of Ignaz-Philip Semmelweis). Since this is the only book I have read of Celine's so far I found the comparisons quite helpful.

Some of the themes of Journey to the End of the Night are obvious. Some are not quite as obvious. For example, Sturrock highlights the theme of the journey. The journey seems to have two functions. First, the fact that Bardamu travels the world is what allows him to claim universality for his insights into human nature. If Bardamu had remained in France for the whole novel the universality of his insights would have been lost. The journey allows us to see that humans are the same everywhere. Second, it allows Celine to highlight one of his fundamental truths about human nature: we are never satisfied being where we are. We need to be continually moving. We are constantly trying to escape our condition, our bodily nature, and the fact of our mortality, but escape is ultimately impossible. The theme of the journey is a theme that I missed when reading the novel but Sturrock does a good job analyzing it.

Sturrock also highlights the theme of the imagination. That is another theme I missed and it made it very difficult for me to understand the passage in the novel where Bardamu perceives the dead flying through the sky. It seemed to me to be the only scene in the book where Bardamu engages in such a fantastic vision. The scene was so puzzling, and seemingly out of place, that as soon as I got this book I tried to find Sturrock's discussion of the scene to see what he made of it. He connects it to the theme of the imagination. Without going into too much detail, basically Bardamu believes we can temporarily escape our situation through the imagination (hence his love of the movies). That is also the function of the writer. I was also a bit mystified about what Robinson was supposed to represent in the novel and Sturrock does a good job analyzing Robinson's role. Overall, Sturrock did an excellent job analyzing the themes of the novel. He deepened my understanding of some of the themes I had already recognized on my own, and he opened my eyes to some themes I had missed.

I would definitely recommend this work to any fan of Celine's book.
Usaxma
This is a rare find, because it concentrates on a book by Celine. Hailing 'Journey' as a masterpiece, the book analyzes the key components and the picaresque adventures of Bardamu. Good companion.