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ISBN:1555530281
Author: Abagail Adams,Judith Sargent Murray,Mary Wollstonecraft,Harriet Martineau,John Stuart Mill,Frances Wright,Margaret Fuller,Sarah Grimke,Emma Goldman,Margaret Sanger
ISBN13: 978-1555530280
Title: The Feminist Papers: From Adams to de Beauvoir
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ePUB size: 1329 kb
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Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Northeastern University Press; Reprint edition (May 19, 1988)
Pages: 716

The Feminist Papers: From Adams to de Beauvoir by Abagail Adams,Judith Sargent Murray,Mary Wollstonecraft,Harriet Martineau,John Stuart Mill,Frances Wright,Margaret Fuller,Sarah Grimke,Emma Goldman,Margaret Sanger



The Feminist Papers: From. has been added to your Cart. Writings included begin with Abigail Adams’ famous Remember the Ladies letter to her husband John Adams; also included are excerpts by Mary Wollstonecraft; Frances Wright; Margaret Fuller; John Stuart Mill; Sarah and Angelina Grimké; Elizabeth Cady Stanton; Susan B. Anthony; Friedrich Engels; Emma Goldman; Margaret Sanger; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Jane Addams; Virginia Woolf; Margaret Mead; Simone de Beauvoir, and others. The selections are well-introduced by Rossi, and are (unlike other collections of this type) lengthy enough to give a fair representation of the writer’s views

Simone de Beauvoir Ursula Tidd Simone de Beauvoir Titles in the series Critical Lives present the work of leading . .The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir Feminist Judgments: From Theory to Practice. Simone de Beauvoir, Gender and Testimony.

16. Mary Wollstonecraft. 25. A Vindication of the Rights. 40. Frances Wright 17951852. 86. Harriet Martineau. 118. Society in America. 144. Along the Suffrage Trail. 407. Selections from the History of Woman Suffrage.

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Her book Woman in the Nineteenth Century is considered the first major feminist work in the United States.

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Introduction: analysis versus action ; "Remember the ladies": Abigail Adams vs. John Adams: selected letters from the Adams family correspondence ; Away from puddings and garments: Judith Sargent Murray ; On the equality of the sexes, Judith Sargent Murray ; Champion of womankind: Mary Wollstonecraft ; A vindication of the rights of woman, Mary Wollstonecraft ; Woman of action: Frances Wright ; Education, Frances Wright ; Of free enquiry, Frances Wright ; The first woman sociologist: Harriet Martineau ; Society in America, Harriet Martineau ; The making of a cosmopolitan humanis.

1973) The Feminist Papers from Adams to de Beauvoir (New York and London: Columbia University Press). Roszak, B. and Roszak, T. (eds) (1969) Masculine/Feminine. Readings in Sexual Mythology and the Liberation of Women (New York: Harper Colophon Books). Walters, M. (1979) 'The Rights and Wrongs of Women: Mary Wollstone-craft, Harriet Martineau, Simone de Beauvoir', in J. Mitchell and A. Oakley (eds). Waltzer, M. (1983) Spheres of Justice. A Defense of Pluralism and Equal-ity (New York: Basic Books).

Here are, as Alice Rossi claims in her well-written preface, 'the essential works of feminism, ' published over a period of 200 years. Her introductions to each section are informative and written with nonpolemical grace. -- Doris Grumbach, New Republic
Reviews: 7
Ubranzac
A gift for my 17 y/o niece. She loved it and all the references
DEAD-SHOT
Editor Alice S. Rossi wrote in the Preface of this 1973 book, “When the publisher approached me… The magnitude of the task---to select and abridge the critical documents in feminist history over the past two centuries---seemed overwhelming… My sociologist’s and feminist’s imagination was fully engaged by the attempt to trace out the connections among the ideas expressed in a published work, the personal life behind an essay or book, and the larger time and place in history in which both the life and the work were anchored. The idea grew to precede each abridged selection with an essay that would serve … to integrate the personal lives with the published essays and books…” (Pg. ix-x) She continues, “As an activist and feminist scholar, I have felt the wish to continuity… Now I have acquired a long line of feminists in the past. There is strength in the vision of a sisterhood that has roots in the past and extends into the future. I hope this volume enables its readers to share in that vision.” (Pg. xi) [NOTE: page numbers below refer to the 716-page 1974 paperback edition.]

Writings included begin with Abigail Adams’ famous “Remember the Ladies” letter to her husband John Adams; also included are excerpts by Mary Wollstonecraft; Frances Wright; Margaret Fuller; John Stuart Mill; Sarah and Angelina Grimké; Elizabeth Cady Stanton; Susan B. Anthony; Friedrich Engels; Emma Goldman; Margaret Sanger; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Jane Addams; Virginia Woolf; Margaret Mead; Simone de Beauvoir, and others. The selections are well-introduced by Rossi, and are (unlike other collections of this type) lengthy enough to give a fair representation of the writer’s views.

To give you a brief idea of what is contained herein, here are a few brief excerpts: Abigail Adams wrote, “in the new Code of Laws… I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to foment a Rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation… such of you as wish to be happy willingly give up the harsh title of Master for the more tender and endearing one of Friend. Why then, not put it out of the power of the vicious and the Lawless to use us with cruelty and indignity with impunity… Regard us then as Beings placed by providence under your protection and in imitation of the Supreme Being make use of that power only for our happiness.” (Pg. 10-11)

Mary Wollstonecraft wrote, “the woman who strengthens her body and exercises her mind will, by managing her family and practicing various virtues, become the friend, and not the humble dependent of her husband… she will not find it necessary to conceal her affection, or to pretend to an unnatural coldness of constitution to excite her husband’s passions. In fact, if we revert to history, we shall find that the women who have distinguished themselves have neither been the most beautiful nor the most gentle of their sex.” (Pg. 51) She adds, “To render mankind more virtuous… both sexes must act from the same principle; but how can that be expected when only one is allowed to see the reasonableness of it … To render also the social compact truly equitable, and in order to spread those enlightening principles … women must be allowed to found their virtue on knowledge, which is scarcely possible unless they be educated by the same pursuits as men.” (Pg. 81)

John Stuart Mill argues, “Neither does it avail anything to say that the nature of the two sexes adapts them to their present function and position, and renders these appropriate to them… I deny that anyone knows, or can know, the nature of the two sexes, as long as they have only been seen in their present relation to one another…What is now called the nature of women is an eminently artificial thing---the result of forced repression in some directions, unnatural stimulation in others…” (Pg. 203) Later, he adds, “The second benefit to be expected from giving to women the free use of their faculties, by leaving them the free choice of their employments, and opening to them the same field of occupation and the same prizes and encouragements as to other human beings, would be that of doubling the mass of mental faculties available for the higher service of humanity.” (Pg. 232)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote in her introduction to The Woman's Bible, “The only points in which I differ from all ecclesiastical teaching is that I do not believe that any man every saw or talked with God, I do not believe that God inspired the Mosaic code, or told the historians what they say he did about woman, for all the religions on the face of the earth degrade her, and so long as woman accepts the positon that they assign her, her emancipation is impossible.” (Pg. 405-406)

Friedrich Engels states, “Thus when monogamous marriage first makes its appearance in history, it is not as the reconciliation of man and woman, still less as the highest form of such a reconciliation. Quite the contrary. Monogamous marriage comes on the scene as the subjugation of one sex by the other; it announces a struggle between the sexes unknown throughout the whole previous prehistoric period… The first class opposition that appears in history coincides with the development of the antagonism between man and woman in monogamous marriage, and the first class oppression coincides with that of the female sex by the male.” (Pg. 482)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman observes, “If the wife is not, then, truly a business partner, in what way does she earn from her husband the food, clothing, and shelter she receives at his hands? By house service, it will be instantly replied. This is the general misty idea upon he subject---that women earn all they get, and more, by house service. Here we come to a very practical and definite economic ground. Although not producers of wealth, women serve in the final processes of preparation and distribution. Their labor in the household has a definite economic value… The labor of women in the house, certainly, enables men to produce more wealth than they otherwise could; and in this way women are economic factors in society. But so are horses… The labor which the wife performs in the household is given as part of her functional duty, not as employment.” (Pg. 573)

Virginia Woolf points out, “I could not help thinking, as I looked at the works of Shakespeare… that… it would have been impossible … for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare. Let me imagine… what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called Judith… She was as adventurous, as imaginative, as agog to see the world as he was. But she was not sent to school. She had no chance of learning grammar and logic… She picked up a book now and then… But then her parents came in and told her to mend the stockings or mind the stew and not moon about books and papers… She had the quickest fancy, a gift like her brother’s, for the tune of words. Like him, she had a taste for the theater. She stood at the stage door; she wanted to act, she said. Men laughed in her face… She could get no training in her craft… That, more or less, is how the story would run … if a woman in Shakespeare’s day had had Shakespeare’s genius…” (Pg. 639-640) She adds, “That woman, then, who was born with a gift of poetry in the sixteenth century, was an unhappy woman, a woman at strife with herself. All the conditions of her life, all her own instincts, were hostile to the state of mind which is needed to set free whatever is in the brain.” (Pg. 642)

This is a wonderful, comprehensive, and eminently useful collection of the writings which led up to the “Second Wave” of the women’s movement in the 1960s and 1970s. Reading this book is like a “crash course” in pre-feminist history. It will be immensely valuable to anyone studying the background of the women’s movement.
Ndyardin
Editor Alice S. Rossi wrote in the Preface of this 1973 book, “When the publisher approached me… The magnitude of the task---to select and abridge the critical documents in feminist history over the past two centuries---seemed overwhelming… My sociologist’s and feminist’s imagination was fully engaged by the attempt to trace out the connections among the ideas expressed in a published work, the personal life behind an essay or book, and the larger time and place in history in which both the life and the work were anchored. The idea grew to precede each abridged selection with an essay that would serve … to integrate the personal lives with the published essays and books…” (Pg. ix-x) She continues, “As an activist and feminist scholar, I have felt the wish to continuity… Now I have acquired a long line of feminists in the past. There is strength in the vision of a sisterhood that has roots in the past and extends into the future. I hope this volume enables its readers to share in that vision.” (Pg. xi) [NOTE: page numbers below refer to the 716-page 1974 paperback edition.]

Writings included begin with Abigail Adams’ famous “Remember the Ladies” letter to her husband John Adams; also included are excerpts by Mary Wollstonecraft; Frances Wright; Margaret Fuller; John Stuart Mill; Sarah and Angelina Grimké; Elizabeth Cady Stanton; Susan B. Anthony; Friedrich Engels; Emma Goldman; Margaret Sanger; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Jane Addams; Virginia Woolf; Margaret Mead; Simone de Beauvoir, and others. The selections are well-introduced by Rossi, and are (unlike other collections of this type) lengthy enough to give a fair representation of the writer’s views.

To give you a brief idea of what is contained herein, here are a few brief excerpts: Abigail Adams wrote, “in the new Code of Laws… I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to foment a Rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation… such of you as wish to be happy willingly give up the harsh title of Master for the more tender and endearing one of Friend. Why then, not put it out of the power of the vicious and the Lawless to use us with cruelty and indignity with impunity… Regard us then as Beings placed by providence under your protection and in imitation of the Supreme Being make use of that power only for our happiness.” (Pg. 10-11)

Mary Wollstonecraft wrote, “the woman who strengthens her body and exercises her mind will, by managing her family and practicing various virtues, become the friend, and not the humble dependent of her husband… she will not find it necessary to conceal her affection, or to pretend to an unnatural coldness of constitution to excite her husband’s passions. In fact, if we revert to history, we shall find that the women who have distinguished themselves have neither been the most beautiful nor the most gentle of their sex.” (Pg. 51) She adds, “To render mankind more virtuous… both sexes must act from the same principle; but how can that be expected when only one is allowed to see the reasonableness of it … To render also the social compact truly equitable, and in order to spread those enlightening principles … women must be allowed to found their virtue on knowledge, which is scarcely possible unless they be educated by the same pursuits as men.” (Pg. 81)

John Stuart Mill argues, “Neither does it avail anything to say that the nature of the two sexes adapts them to their present function and position, and renders these appropriate to them… I deny that anyone knows, or can know, the nature of the two sexes, as long as they have only been seen in their present relation to one another…What is now called the nature of women is an eminently artificial thing---the result of forced repression in some directions, unnatural stimulation in others…” (Pg. 203) Later, he adds, “The second benefit to be expected from giving to women the free use of their faculties, by leaving them the free choice of their employments, and opening to them the same field of occupation and the same prizes and encouragements as to other human beings, would be that of doubling the mass of mental faculties available for the higher service of humanity.” (Pg. 232)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote in her introduction to The Woman's Bible, “The only points in which I differ from all ecclesiastical teaching is that I do not believe that any man every saw or talked with God, I do not believe that God inspired the Mosaic code, or told the historians what they say he did about woman, for all the religions on the face of the earth degrade her, and so long as woman accepts the positon that they assign her, her emancipation is impossible.” (Pg. 405-406)

Friedrich Engels states, “Thus when monogamous marriage first makes its appearance in history, it is not as the reconciliation of man and woman, still less as the highest form of such a reconciliation. Quite the contrary. Monogamous marriage comes on the scene as the subjugation of one sex by the other; it announces a struggle between the sexes unknown throughout the whole previous prehistoric period… The first class opposition that appears in history coincides with the development of the antagonism between man and woman in monogamous marriage, and the first class oppression coincides with that of the female sex by the male.” (Pg. 482)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman observes, “If the wife is not, then, truly a business partner, in what way does she earn from her husband the food, clothing, and shelter she receives at his hands? By house service, it will be instantly replied. This is the general misty idea upon he subject---that women earn all they get, and more, by house service. Here we come to a very practical and definite economic ground. Although not producers of wealth, women serve in the final processes of preparation and distribution. Their labor in the household has a definite economic value… The labor of women in the house, certainly, enables men to produce more wealth than they otherwise could; and in this way women are economic factors in society. But so are horses… The labor which the wife performs in the household is given as part of her functional duty, not as employment.” (Pg. 573)

Virginia Woolf points out, “I could not help thinking, as I looked at the works of Shakespeare… that… it would have been impossible … for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare. Let me imagine… what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called Judith… She was as adventurous, as imaginative, as agog to see the world as he was. But she was not sent to school. She had no chance of learning grammar and logic… She picked up a book now and then… But then her parents came in and told her to mend the stockings or mind the stew and not moon about books and papers… She had the quickest fancy, a gift like her brother’s, for the tune of words. Like him, she had a taste for the theater. She stood at the stage door; she wanted to act, she said. Men laughed in her face… She could get no training in her craft… That, more or less, is how the story would run … if a woman in Shakespeare’s day had had Shakespeare’s genius…” (Pg. 639-640) She adds, “That woman, then, who was born with a gift of poetry in the sixteenth century, was an unhappy woman, a woman at strife with herself. All the conditions of her life, all her own instincts, were hostile to the state of mind which is needed to set free whatever is in the brain.” (Pg. 642)

This is a wonderful, comprehensive, and eminently useful collection of the writings which led up to the “Second Wave” of the women’s movement in the 1960s and 1970s. Reading this book is like a “crash course” in pre-feminist history. It will be immensely valuable to anyone studying the background of the women’s movement.
Vonalij
I had a paperback copy of this book when I was in my early 20s and struggling with the toxic ideas about women that I'd grown up with. This book, which I think I found at a yard sale, was of enormous importance to me at that time. Prior to reading (a great deal of) the book, I didn't know that women had a long and rich intellectual tradition. I hadn't known about the sheer courage of the women who agitated for the vote. I didn't know that some of the Western world's most prominent philosophers had supported the idea of the equality of women. This book is what it is: an intellectual history of Western thought on the political position of women, which has a particular and obvious relevance for western women, of which I am one. There are many other fine books on feminist theoretical history in other traditions, and innumerable volumes on contemporary feminist theory, but I don't fault this volume for not being among them. I'm glad to find this book still in print, and I'm ordering myself another copy today. And maybe an extra for my grad department!